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GOVERNMENT INFORMATION CENTER 
SAN RRANCI8CO PUBUC UBRARY 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 

REFERENCE 
BOOK 

Not in be taken from /lie Library 



tlAM \ 6 Lbiii , ,„,,;^™ N CISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 

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3 1223 05718 6448 



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ANNUAL REPORT TO THE MAYOR 
FOR 

1951+- - 1955 









By the 

\ PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

of the 

CITY AND COUNTY OP SAN FRANCISCO 



3 1223 05718 6448 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 



September 21, 1955 

Honorable Elmer E. Robinson, r.ayor 
City and County of San Francisco 
San Francisco, California. 

Dear Mayor Robinson: 

Pursuant to instructions, respectfully submitted herein is 
the annual report of work performed by the Purchasing Department 
during the Fiscal Year 1954-1955. 

This report was prepared by the staff of the Purchasing 
Department and reviewed by this office after the unfortunate and 
unexpected death of the City Purchaser, Harold H. Jones. Mr. Jones 
had held the position of Purchaser for five years after long ser- 
vice with the City and County, his last promotion having been from 
General Superintendent of Shops. lie was highly competent and uni- 
versally respected. His passing was a great loss to the City and 
County Government and to the community. 

BUYING AND AC COUNTING DIVISIONS 

Total Purchases made by the Purchasing Department for the 
various departments and the San Francisco Unified School District 
for: 

1954-1955 > il+,6oo Ai8. kh 

1953-1954 13.972.937.63 

an INCREASE of 627,4 e 0.8l 

The 1954-!955 total was made up as follows: 

GENERAL 5, 384.3*1.0.07 

EDUCATION 2,349*927.45 

HEALTH 2,086,154.74 

UTILITIES 4,431. 150.47 

PURCHASER'S REVOLVING FUND %lQ . QhS . 7 1 

•.. l4,600,4l8.1+lj. 



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-2- 

Payments and Discounts 

The drive continues to expedite payments to vendors and take 
advantage of all cash discounts. Particular attention is given to 
those payments involving large cash discounts. Results are very 
satisfactory and continue to improve. The cooperation of the depart- 
ments has been very helpful in this connection. 

The fact that payments are now being processed more rapidly 
has been well received by vendors with whom the City does business. 
This has encouraged more local competition for Gity bids. 

DISCOUNT 

For the period July 1, 195l|-, thru June 30, 1955. 

Dollars Percentage 

Cash Discounts TAKEN r., 27,677.51 96.2^ 

New Contract Procedure 

The new contract procedure has proven very satisfactory. A 
substantial saving of time has been noted in completing transactions. 

Departmental Revolving Funds (Various Departments.) 

Those departments having revolving funds are now permitted to 
make cash purchases up to G15* All such expenditures are subse- 
quently checked in the Purchasing Department as to correct price, 
contract items, and the like and also audited by the Controller's 
Office. Departments, particularly those with large amounts of stores, 
are thus enabled to delete from their inventories many slow moving 
standard items of relatively low unit value. 

Annual Bid Bond 

Bidders now have the option of filing an annual bid bond rather 
than submitting a certified check with each bid requiring a deposit. 
This has proved very popular with bidders, particularly those firms 
who submit numerous bids during the year. 

Controller 

All changes and improvements in procedure have been done with 
the approval and cooperation of the Controller, especially in those 
cases where accounting policies are involved or where procedure 
changes in the Purchasing Department affect the related procedures in 
the Controller's Office. 



-3- 

Purchaser 's Petty Purchase Revolving F und 

The maximum amount for Petty Purchase Orders at present time 
is /SO, with payments made twice monthly; all discounts are taken on 
these orders. This system continues to operate very satisfactorily 
for the benefit of both the City departments and the vendors. 

The following summary reflects the operation of the Purchaser's 
Revolving Fund for the year 195^-1955: 

Number of individual orders written li|_,321 

Average number of monthly orders written .... 1,193 

Total amount of money for fiscal year !p3^8>8[|.5.71 

SALES AND INVENTORY DIVISION 

Sales 

Forty-four sales complete in themselves, plus one sale of Hay 
and other Agricultural Products which consisted of nine individual 
sales, were conducted in 195^-1955, making a total of 53 sales for 
the year. Total revenue from sales was $ilfQ,701»$$« All sales were 
of personal property unfit or unnecessary for the use of the City and 
County and were made under the authority of Section 88 of the Charter. 

Breakdown of sales : 

Metal Scrap and Salvage $ 25,123.0lj. 

Fire Boats 25,500.00 

Alameda Pipeline 22,600.00 

Dried Sewage Sludge lif., 218.21 

Swill 13,979.50 

Cable Cars 12,058.28 

Agricultural Products (vVater Dept . ) ... 6,217.69 

X-Ray Film 5,365.03 

Miscellaneous Equipment 3,895.07 

Rock (aggregates) 3*750.00 

Typewriters 2,838.57 

Sheep and Wool 1,253.49 

Motor Coaches 972.60 

Grease and Bones q.36 . 18 

Miscellaneous Sales . .» 2, 5uiu22 

TOTAL REVENUE FROM SALES S llj.0,751.88 



-4- 

Some unusual personal property disposed of this year included two 
retired fifty-year-old fire boats, a mountain of rock from Hetch 
Hetchy, seventy-five year old Alameda Water Pipeline, cable cars and 
cable car bells. The sale of surplus cable cars received national 
attention through the press, radio and television. 

The close of the Fiscal Year 195^-1955 marked the end of a two- 
year contract for the disposal of dried sewage sludge produced at the 
Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant. The total of 553M- tons was sold 
during the contract period for j;27,670. 

Inventory 

The equipment inventory program for the Fiscal Year 195^-1955 
was concerned principally with the Public Health and Fire Departments, 
both of which have been completed. Other Public departments and 
offices rechecked and brought up to date were the Mayor, City Attorney, 
Assessor, Recorder, Public Defender, Recreation and Park, District 
Attorney, Log Cabin Ranch, Controller and Purchasing Department. A 
complete recheck was made of the Juvenile Court Home and Log Cabin 
School, due to a change in the department head. Investigations, 
follow-ups and adjustments were made to the perpetual inventory on 
missing or stolen equipment. 

Many transfers of equipment and supplies between departments 
were effected, enabling much discarded equipment to be put to further 
use. The inventory division checks and analyses requisitions for 
equipment before purchases are made with a view toward keeping such 
purchases in line with budgetary requests and appropriations and pre- 
venting possible duplications. 

Permits for the operation of vending machines on City property 
in accordance with Ordinance Mo. 6562 were kept current. Additional 
vending machines and new locations were added as requested and ap- 
proved. 

Various special assignments and services as assigned by the 
Purchaser of Supplies were carried out by this division, among which 
were: 

1. Storeroom procedure was set up under the direction 
of the Purchaser of Supplies at San Francisco Inter- 
national Airport. 

2. The handling and moving of furniture, equipment and 
supplies between departments at various locations. 

3. Office, accounting and storekeeping procedure at 
various storerooms was coordinated and organized. 

The general equipment inventory is nearing completion. By 
June, 1956 all departments, with the exception of those under Public 
Utilities, will have been inventoried. Thereafter the inventory crew 
will locate, identify and list all equipment purchased or acquired 
since the last physical check. 



-s: ;;■■ 



-5- 

CIVILIAK DEFENSE CONTRIBUTIONS 

The Purchaser of Supplies is Chief of the Procurement Division 
of the San Francisco Disaster Council and Corps. Key personnel of 
the department have volunteered and have been assigned to staff work 
in the Procurement Division. They have participated in practice ex- 
ercises and drills and have developed procedures and established 
sources of supply in order that the Procurement Division may function 
efficiently in the event of an emergency. 

TABULATING &ND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau provides a centralized 
service, available to all city departments, in the following fields; 
photography, photostating, microfilming, mimeographing and offset 
duplicating, blue printing and machine accounting (I.B.M. ). 

Over fifty city departments make regular use of these services. 
The gross amount of work performed during the last fiscal year amount- 
ed to $167,036 - increase of 7,727 over the previous year. 

Much of the work performed in this Bureau is of a continuing 
or recurring nature. Important among these operations are the pre- 
paration of specifications and blue prints required for bidders on 
construction of schools, playgrounds, public buildings, etc; re- 
production of annual budget estimates, block maps, transcripts of 
property sales and transfers; accounting records and registers con- 
cerning traffic citations issued, purchase orders, inventory records, 
sales tax and business licenses. 

The maintaining of license fee records through the use of 
business machines in the Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau was in- 
augurated by the Tax Collector during the past fiscal year. 

CENTRAL SHOPS 

The Purchasing Department through its Central Shops No's. 1, 
2, and 3» and sub-shops and garages, is charged with the repair and 
maintenance of all city-owned automobiles, trucks and motor propelled 
vehicles (except Public Utilities), mechanical apparatus and machines, 
fire apparatus, high pressure pumping stations, bridges, sewage treat- 
ment plants, park locomotive and train, merry-go-rounds, ferris 
wheels, zoo equipment, parking meter collection equipment, Log Cabin 
Ranch water supply pumps and motors, pasteurizing boiler, golf course 
and playground equipment and other miscellaneous mechanical and 
machine work at schools, etc. 



-6- 



Central Shops (Continued) 



Shops and garages are maintained at the following locations: 

Central Shop Jo. 1 313 Francisco St. 

Central Shops No. 2 2800 Alameda St. 

Central Shop No. 3 17J4.5 California St. 

Central Gas Station l£th & Harrison Sts. 

Gas Station & Grease Rack 2323 Army Street 

Park Garage Golden Gate Park 

Hall of Justice Garage 'Washington & Kearny Sts 

19th Ave., Sub-Station 2350 19th Ave. 

Health Garage Health Bldg . -101 Grove St . 

Dept. of Electricity 26I4. Golden Gate Ave. 

Motorcycle Shop Sou. Sta.-I4.th & Clara Sts 

No. Point Sewage Treatment Plant Bay & No. Point Sts 

Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant 1800 Jerrold Ave. 

Richmond-Sunset Sewage Treatment Plant .. Golden Gate Park 

Major overhauls were made to both V12 and 6 cylinder fire 
engine motors. Main bearings are now line-bored exclusively, mini- 
mizing warping of crankcases. 

Two new battery wagon hose tenders were assembled in the shops 
and have been placed in service. 

Some of the large vertical sludge pumps at the North Point 
Sewage Treatment Plant, which have been in use for five years, re- 
quired overhauling. Repairs were made and shafts reconditioned. 

The decals for Police cars and City seals are being made in the 
shops on "Scotch-lite" reflector type material by the silk screen 
process. Although the initial cost is slightly higher than for the 
paper decals formerly used, the advantage to the city is in longer 
service plus better appearance. 

Storekeeping 



Storekeeping personnel are maintained by the Purchasing Depart^ 

ment in each of the following locations to administer warehousing 

functions and distribution of City owned material, equipment and 
supplies: 

Central 'Varehouse 15th & Harrison Sts 

Shop No. 1 2033 Stockton St. 

Water Department Yard Bryant Street 

( Elkton Yard 

( 2l(.th oc Utah Sts 

( Kirkland, No. Point & Powell 

Municipal Railway ( Ocean & san Jose Aves. 

( 9I4.9 Presidio Ave. 
( 17th & Potrero 
( 17th & Potrero, Transfer Room 



-7- 

Storekeeping (Continued) 

Recreation and Park Department . ,, f Park Garage, Golden Gate Park 

San Francisco Hospital , 1001 Potrero Avenue 

Laguna Honda Home 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 

Hassler Health Home , , Redwood City 

Hetch Hetchy , . . . . ? T Mocaasin, California 

Works »».♦,« 2323 Army Street 

Electricity , , t , 264. Golden Gate Avenue 

One storekeeper is attached to the Inventory Division. 

For the Fiscal Year 1954--1955 expenditures for materials and 
labor for the maintenance of equipment totaled approximately v5>83>339» 
including supplemental appropriations and work orders. 

PERSONNEL 

The purchasing Department is operated by 198 employees, divided 
into 39 classifications. The following is a tabulation of the number 
of employees by classifications: 

1 Purchaser of Supplies 

1 Chief Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

1 Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

7 Assistant Purchasers 

1 Printing and Stationery Buyer 

1 Assistant Stationery Buyer 

1 Supervisor pf Equipment and Supplies 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating Division 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau 

1 General Superintendent of Shops 
3 Foreman, Auto Machinists 

2 Sub-Foreman, Auto Machinists 

2 Head Clerks 

3 Bookkeepers 

9 General Storekeepers 
23 Storekeepers 

4 General Clerks 

10 General Clerk-Stenographers 
17 General Clerk-Typists 
25 Garageman 

3 Blacksmiths 

4 Blacksmith Finishers 
33 Auto Machinists 

1 Batteryman Electrician 

2 Patternmakers 

4. Car and Auto Painters 

2 Auto Fender and Body Workers 

1 Leather Worker 

1 Chauffeur 

2 Duplicating Machine Operators 
6 Key Punch Operators 



■■■' 1 



-8- 



Personnel (Continued) 



8 


Tabulating Machine 


0perat< 


Drs 




1 


Senior Tabulating '. 


Machine 


Ope 


irator 


3 


Blueprinters 








1 


Photostat Operator 








1 


Photographer 








1 


Laborer 








9 


Machinists 









PURCHASE ORDERS PAID 
JULY 1, 195k TO JUNE 30. 1955 



MONTH 


GENERAL 


EDUCATION 




No. of 


Value of 


No. of 


Value of 




Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


July 


2,091+ 


$789,86i+.i2 


676 


$261+, 936. 1+7 


August 


1,227 


586,152.30 


1±60 
697 


332,33i+.01 


September 


1,210 


551+, 798. 01 
lj.32,682.18 


169,232,18 


October 


1,276 


530 


237,731.02 


November 


1,01k 
1,198 


307,162.96 


3?6 


57,066.35 


December 


399,129.7,3 
1+51,580.35- 


?fo 


27k, 020. 9ij. 
128,305.12 


January 


1,1+27 


i+78 


February 


911 


293,658.96 


373 


236,973.32 


March 


1,422 


1+59, 982.1+1 


383 


135,853.73 


April 


1,H5 


1+37,528.28 


506 


275,1+08.87 


May 


1,053 


296,171.66 


$ 


111,781.1+6 


June 


925 


375,629.12 


126,283.98 




14,872 $5,38^,31+0.07 


5,697 : 


>2, 31+9,927. 1+5 



-9- 



PURCHASE ORDERS PAID 





JULY 1, 195k to JUNE 


30, 1955 




MONTH 


HEALTH 


UTILITIES 




No. of 


Value of 


No. of 


Value of 




Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


Orders 


July 


£96 


0293,898.53 


768 


$610,095.67 


August 


ko8 


2l8,5k3.32 


k3 I 


29^,778.67 


September 


k20 


172,735.33 


fe8 


323,529.01 


October 


k52 


183,382.51 


503 
k53 


3k9, 500.12 


November 


W> 


113,380.29 


351,057.27 


December 


181,565.32 


&8 
601 


192,906.65 


January 


k52 


206,209.03 


k2k,525.01 


February 


376 

m 


175,912.6k 
213,189.36 


k50 


3kk,873.89 
336,6k5.5§ 


March 


$2$ 


April 


306 


Hl5,553.63 


370,Q03.o6 


May 


3^.9 


133,237.26 


713,612.59 


June 


lko 


k8.5k7.k7 


316 


118_J22.95 




ij-,81+2 


O2,086,l5k.7k 


5,91+8 


$k,k31,l50.k7 




PETTY PURCHASING & 






MONTH 


REVOLVING FUND 
No. of Value of 


GRAND 




No. of 


Value of 




Orders 
966 


Orders 
622,836.50 


Orders 
5,200 


Orders 


July 


#1,981,631.29 


August 


1,059 


25,652.72 


&I016 


l,l(.57,k6l.02 


September 


1,231 


31,057.75 


1,251,352.28 


October 


1,299 


31,0l(.7.01 


k,o6o 


1,23k, 3k2. 8k 


November 


1,139 


26,905.82 


3,2k7 
k,039 


855,572.69 


December 


1,338 


31,302.50 


1,078,925.1k 
1,238,686.58 


January 


1,15k 


28,067.03 


lj.,112 


February 


1,193 


28,961.33 


i',id 


1,080,380.1k 


March 


1.336 

1,266 


33,6k8.73 


1,179,319.81 


April 


31,603.69 


3,7k7 


1,260,997.53 


May 


1,272 


31,613.88 


3 »l9? 

2,856 


l,286,li.l6.85 


June 


1,070 


26.lk8.75 


695,332.27 




Ik, 321 


W,Qk$.n 


k5, 680 


$lk,600,kl8.kk 



-10- 

EXPENDITURES 

A COMPARISON OF EXPENDITURES FOR ALL APPROPRIATIONS (OTHER THAN THOSE 
FOR PERSONAL SERVICES) WITH ORIGINAL BUDGET APPROPRIATIONS FOR 

1954-1955: 

Account Budgeted Expended S urplus Deficit 

433.200.00 Contractual Serv. 033,551.00 &37, 208.27 — y 3,657.27 

14-33- 300.00 Materials & Spls. 11,510.00 14,047. 55 — 2,537.55 

ij.33.^00. 01 Equipment (Purch.) 1,120.00 6,382.05 -- 5,262.05 

l|.33.I(.00. 02 Equipment (Shops) — 5,867.10 — 5,867.10 

1+33.812.33 Personal Bonds 10,000.00 7,139.62 2,860.38 

ij-33.8l3.33 Auto Insurance 21,500.00 19,687.50 1, 812.50 ^ 

$77,681.00 $90,332.09$l4-,672.88 $17,323.97 

REVENUES 
A COMPARISON OF REVENUES WITH REVENUES ESTIMATED IN BUDGET OF 

1954-1955: 

Estimated Actual Actual Actual 
Account Income Income -OVER- -UNDER- 



706l Sale of 

Documents 




4k 


i44«oo 


$ 144.00 


_„ 


7062 Minor Sales 




1,000.00 


3,775.00 


2,775.00 


— 


7063 Damages 




— 


20.00 


20.00 


-- 


7061|. Misc. Sales 




20.00 


160.00 


140.00 


— 


7099 Misc. Revenue 




— 


— 


— 


— 


7l|5l Sale of Sludge 




10,000.00 


13,571.56 


3,571.56 


-- 


7621 Sale of Swill 
7621 Sale of Grease 
& Bones 


) 
) 
) 


14,000.00 


(13,787.50 ) 
( 616.64 ) 


404.14 


-- 



$25,020.00 ,32,074.70 17,054.70 






-11- 



CONCLUSION 

The foregoing activities, along with inspections, testing, 
sampling, writing of specifications, setting up of annual, semi-, 
annual, and quarterly buying schedules and other affiliated duties, 
summarize work performed by the Purchasing Department last fiscal 
year and comprise substantially the work program for 1955-1956. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Chief A'aidni^raftve^orfi^a^- 



[a 

3 



PURCHASING DEPART MENT 
CITY" AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT 



September, 1956 

DOCUMENTS DEPfc 

SEP 27 1956 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRA"* 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 
ZONE 2 



September 1I4., 1956 



Mr. Thomas A. Brooks, 

Chief administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Brooks: 

Transmitted herewith arc six copies of the 
annual Report of the Purchasing Department, prepared 
in response to His Honor Mayor Christopher's request 
in connection with his forthcoming annual report to 
the Board of Supervisors, 

I should like to take this opportunity to ex- 
press my appreciation for the confidence you placed in 
me in appointing me Purchaser of Supplies and to thank 
you for your continuing cooperation and support. 

I should also like to express my gratitude for 
the understanding cooperation I have received from all 
departments of the City and County and from the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District. 

I wont you to know too of my most sincere appre- 
ciation of the intelligent devotion to duty and the firm 
loyalty shown during the last year by all personnel in 
the Purchasing Department. 

Sincerely yours, 



^j£}s\s /r^^^-^c 



B. G. Kline 
Purchaser of Supplies 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 
ZONE 2 



AN NUAL REPOR T September, 1956 



The Purchasing Department is responsible for 

1. The purchase of all materials and supplies, equipment 
and contractual services for all departments of the City and 
County and the San Francisco Unified School District; 

2. The sale of surplus materials, supplies and equipment 
for the various departments; 

3- The repair and maintenance of automotive and other 
equipment for all departments except Public Utilities; 

k. The maintenance of a perpetual inventory of equipment 
for the. various departments and the operation of general stores; 
and 

Jj. The operation of a central tabulating and reproduction 
bureau for departments needing such services. 

The following executive assistants report directly to the 
Purchaser of Supplies: 

Chief Assistant Purchaser, in charge of the buying division 
and sharing with the Purchaser of Supplies supervision of all div- 
isions ; 

Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies, responsible for sales, 
the perpetual inventory of equipment, and storokeeping; 

General Superintendent of Shops, in complete charge of the 
Department's three main automotive repair shops and equipment re- 
pairs at other locations; 

Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau, who per- 
forms the functions his titlo indicates. 

The Senior Assistant Purchaser assists in the supervision 
of the buying division and acts as Chief Assistant Purchaser dur- 

-1- 



ing the latter's absence or occupation with special assignments. 
Two head clerics also hold key positions in the Central Office in 
the supervision of clerical employes, and two foreman auto mach- 
inists carry heavier responsibilities than their titles imply be- 
cause of the unfortunate physical separation of the Purchaser's 
three central shops. The Department has 108 employes. 

Weekly staff meetings, attended by buyers and division 
heads, were inaugurated last December and have been beneficial in 
many respects. The interchange of ideas is resulting in adoption 
and standardization of the best procedures, and every participant 
has had an opportunity to contribute to the policies of the De- 
partment. The advice of the Superintendent of Shops on specifi- 
cations and technical matters, of the Supervisor of Equipment and 
Supplies with respect to storekceping and receiving and inspection 
procedures, and of the Supervisor of the Tabulating and Reprod- 
uction Division in matters involving certain equipment and sup- 
plies and preparation of forms has been advantageous. 



B UYING DIVISION 

The principal function of the Department of course is pur- 
chasing. Stress has been placed during the last year, and con- 
tinues to be placed, upon: 

1. Standardization of equipment and supplies in common 
use in various departments in order to take advantage of quantity 
prices; 

2. Broadening of our sources of supplies and equipment to 
insure fair competitive prices; 

3. Improvement of service to the various departments and 
the School District; 

L. Curtailment of non-competitive buying. 

A single purchase of manual typewriters for all depart- 
ments was made in 1955-1956, resulting in a substantial saving in 
equipment and buying costs. Other types of equipment will be so 
purchased this year. 

Specifications are constantly being revised and improved 
to contribute to all four aims listed above. Standardization will 
be encouraged by new "performance" specifications for dishwashing 
compound, general cleaning agents and similar products, already 
accomplished or boing prepared. Automotive storage batteries are 
being purchased competitively on newly prepared specifications, 

-2- 



and bids for tires and recapping have been invited on new speci- 
fications. The term lumber proposal has been simplified and 
brought up to date in accordance with current grading rules, and 
plywood has been added to the contract. 

Such indefinite-amount contract items as carbon paper, 
stencils, drawing pencils and certain contractual services are 
being carefully checked before and after contracts are entered in- 
to to make sure that standardization will not be a disservice to 
the various departments. Quality, or usefulness to the depart- 
ment, is as important a consideration as price in the buying div- 
ision. 

Greater bidder response is being encouraged through re- 
vision of bid forms to make them clearer and simpler, the improve- 
ment of specifications, the making of bid invitations more readi- 
ly available, and improvement in any way possible of our relations 
with suppliers. "General Conditions, Instructions and Information 
for Bidders", used in connection with formal contract proposals, 
have boon simplified and clarified to aid bidders, and a new 
formal quotation form is being prepared. Inquiries are being made 
when bidder response is poor so that we can improve our procedures 
or specifications if thay are found to be at fault. 

Aggregate bidding is being encouraged to obtain better 
quantity prices, to reward low bidders with substantial orders, 
and to reduce the Department's costs of issuing multiple purchase 
orders . 

The policy of assigning work to buyers on a commodity 
rather than commodity and departmental basis has boon accelerated. 
This policy has been well received by supplier representatives, 
as it permits a salesman to confine his calls to a single buyer, 
and it is expected x,o result in better service to departments as 
buyers become more familiar with the commodities they handle and 
more expert in their procurement. 

Although it is recognized that it is advantageous to the 
City for the departments to be able to purchase minor, non-recur- 
ring, necded-at-once items without delay-producing procedures, 
efforts arc being made to curtail the amount of such purchasing 
without injuring departmental operations. A term contract for 
miscellaneous electrical items has been entered into on the basis 
of a standard book of list prices. Studies are being made to see 
if other commodities can be similarly contracted for, and the 
possibility of increasing periodic definite quantity purchases 
for stores is being tak^n up with departments. Specialized ser- 
vices are being placed insofar as possible under contracts which 
specify services to be rendered, prices to be charged, and total 
encumbrance required. 

-3- 



Besides the chief assistant purchaser and senior assist- 
ant purchaser, the Department has eight full time buyers, seven 
classified as assistant purchasers and one as printing and sta- 
tionery buyer. An assistant stationery buyer does purchasing and 
also supervises distribution of: stationery and other supplies from 
the central warehouse. 



'URCHASING- STATISTICS 







1955-1956 


1954-1955 




Purchas 

Orders 




Amount 


Purchase 
Orders 


Amount 


GENERAL 


15,323 


* 5,565,130 


14,872 


:., 5,384,340 


EDUCATION 


5,742 


2,485,078 


5,697 


2,349,927 


HEALTH 


k,m 


1,794,131 


4, 842 


2,086,154 


UTILITIES 


5,913 


4,674,509 


5,943 


4,44!, 1^0 



PETTY PURCHASE 
ORDERS (Not Ex- 
ceeding t^O) llj., 210 



TOTALS 45,908 



36li ; 97l4. 



$14,883,825 



lit-, 321 



MiM 



1+5,680 ^14,600,418 



CASH DISCOUNTS 

TAKEN ^32,185 - 94.8^ 



')27,677 - 96. 2% 



-4- 



EXPENDITURE S 

A comparison of expenditures for all appropriations (other than those 
for personal services) with original budget appropriations for 
1955-1956: 

Account Budgeted Expended Surplus Defici t 

5.311.200.000 

Contractual Services 320,367 319,229 $1,137 

5.311-300.000 

Materials & Supplies 10,300 11,673 — ■ $1,373 

5.311.i^00.000 

Equipment 528 1+85 k-2- 

5.311-812.311 

Premium on Official Bonds 10,000 9,^1-86 513 

5.3H.813.3H 

Premium on Auto Insurance 20,500 18,15 7 2 , 3i-!-2 -- 

TOTALS 061,695 ',,59,032 ^036 $1,373 



REVENUES 

A comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in budget for 
1955-1956: 

Estimated Actual Actual Actual 

Accou nt Income Income Over Under 

7061 Sale of Documents -200 &9 8 ~ $ 101 

7062 Minor Sales 3,000 2,553 -- W> 

7063 Damages — 282 282 

706I). Misc. Sal es 50 -- -- 50 

7099 Misc. Revenues 25 — — 2 5 

7i+5l Sale of Sludge 15,000 5,329 — 9,670 

7621 Sale of Swill, Grease & Bonos 13,000 8,10k. ^,895 

TOTALS $31,275 $16,367 $282 vl5,l39 

-5- 



SALES 

Fifty-two sales of personal property unfit or unnecessary 
for the use of the City and County were conducted in 1955-1906, 
for a total revenue of 5113,211. 

Commodities sold were: 

Metal Scrap and Salvage $ If.O,8Q3 

Motor Coaches, Street Cars and Parts 31,66l 

Agricultural Sales 9,?55 

Swill 7,085 

Cable Cars 5,5lj-7 

Type-Setting Equipment 5, 000 

Sludge (Sewage Treatment Plant) 3,586 

Objects of Art 2,361 

Railway Crane 1 , [l65 

Sacks and Containers 1,2Il3 

Tuolumne River Bridge 1 . 050 

Grease and Bones 706 

Sand oOO 

Waste Paper 566 

Shetland Ponies l^hjb 

Sheep and Wool ij.38 

Traffic Signals, Cable Car Bells 

and Street Poles t ........ . 358 

Auditorium Chairs 300 

Musical Instruments (School District) 1I4.3 

TOTAL REVE1TJS FROM SALES $113,211 

Classifiable as "collector's items" were 6 Cable Cars, 
Cable Car Bells, "Birdcage" typo Traffic Signals and various 
Objects of Art from the deYoung iiuseum. The sale of Cable Cars 
received wide attention; the actual sale was broadcast and tele- 
vised on a national network. 

Revenue from swill from City institutions is becoming in- 
significant because of the discouragement of hog raising in the 
Bay Area, the state law requiring pasteurization, and the in- 
creasing use of garbage disposal units. 

The Agricultural Products Sales were for the Water Depart- 
ment and included Alfalfa, Oat, Pasture and Volunteer Kay; Bar- 
ley; Oats, and Wheat . 

A new 5-yc-ar contract was entered into in July, 1955? for 
the sale of Dried Sewage Sludge produced at the Southeast Sewage 
Treatment Plant . 



-6- 



CENTRAL 5HCPS 

The Purchasing Department through its Central Shops Nos. 
1. 2, and 3 5 and sub-shops and garages, repairs and maintains all 
City-owned automobiles, trucks and motor propelled vehicles (ex- 
cept for Public Utilities), mechanical apparatus and machines, 
fire apparatus, inhalators and breathing equipment, high pressure 
pumping stations, tanks and stand-by stations, sewage treatment 
plant equipment, park locomotive and train, merry-go-rounds, 
f orris wheels, zoo equipment, hand and power lawn mowers, and 
other miscellaneous mechanical equipment at schools, Log Cabin 
Ranch, golf courses and playgrounds. 

Repair shops and garages are operated at the following 
locations: 

Central Shop No. 1, 313 Francisco Street 

Central Shop No. 2, 2800 Alameda Street -::- 

Central Shop No. 3, 1714-5 California Street 

Central Gas Station, lj?th & Harrison Streets 

G-as Station & Grease Rack, 2323 Army Street 

ParK Garage, Golden Gate Park 

Hall of Justice Garage, Washington & Kearny Streets 

19th Ave., Sub-Station, 2350 19th Avenue 

Health Garage, Health Center Bldg., 101 Grove Street 

Dept. of Electricity, 26J4. Golden Gate Avenue 

Motorcycle Shop, Southern Station, 4th & Clara Streets 

North Point Sewage Treatment Plant, Bay & North Point Sts 

Southeast Sewage Treatment Plant, l800 Jerrold Avenue 

Richmond-Sunset Sewage Treatment Plant, Golden Gate Park 

-::- Being moved to 660 Chestnut Street for maximum of 
18 months . 

The hope has arisen recently that the inadequacy of the 
City's central repair shops, which has handicapped efficiency and 
caused delays and high automotive repair costs, is scheduled to 
be overcome. 

Shoo No. 1, where Fire Department equipment is maintained 
and repaired, has become obsolete and inadequate for the larger, 
longer and more complicated modern apparatus. The shop on Fran- 
cisco Street was designed for early day small equipment. Aerial 
trucks are replacing the old City ladder trucks, and when two of 
the newer pieces of equipment are in the shop at one time every- 
thing is blocked. 

Three floor levels are a handicap. Equipment has to be 
moved into the street to be taken from the repair shop to the 
paint or blacksmith shop. Lack of dead storage space keeps pits 

-7- 



tied up when apparatus is torn down and waiting for parts, which 
may bo for several weeks, as it is normal for some fire apparatus 
to be quite old before it has worn out. It is essential to 
proper maintenance of Fire Department apparatus that Shop No. 1 
be replaced by a lay-out of modern, adequate facilities. 

Shop No. 2, which maintains automotive equipment for the 
Public Works and other departments, is being moved from its very 
poor housing on Alameda Street to a temporary location at 660 
Chestnut Street, where it will occupy structures recently abandon- 
ed by the Scavenger Association for modern automotive storage and 
repair facilities. 

The Alameda Street Shop 2 site and the Public Works De- 
partment's old asphalt plant have been sold for 0230,000, which 
amount is available for construction of the first unit of consol- 
idated centrr.l shops which ultimately will bring Shops Nos. 1, 
2, and 3 together. A City-owned location is available for the 
centralized operation on surplus land acquired for the Southeast 
Sewage Treatment Plant, adjacent to the site for the new Depart- 
ment of Electricity offices and plant. Preliminary layout has 
been prepared. 

Greater efficiency, less delay in repair of equipment, and 
lower costs of repairs will result from consolidation of the three 
central repair shops. Shjp No. 3, which maintains Police and cer- 
tain other automotive equipment, is in a rented building. The 
three shops are not properly equipped, and they could not all 
have adequate equipment without costly duplication. Cars and 
trucks being repaired have to be moved from one shop to another 
for painting or other work which only one is equipped to do. 
Supervision and planning of work are most difficult and only 
Shop No. 1 has a properly operated storeroom for parts and sup- 
plies . 

An appropriation has been requested to pay for plans and 
specifications for the proposed consolidated shop facilities. 
Besides the ^230,000 available for construction of the first unit, 

to house Shop No. 2 when it has to leave its present location, 
a substantial portion of the cost of the consolidated shops will 
come from s^Ig of the Francisco Street property and from the sav- 
ing of rent for Shop No. 3. 

Despite handicaps the three shops continue to maintain the 
City's automotive equipment and carry on the other work for which 
they are responsible. Major overhauls of motor vehicles continue 
in all shops as needed. On fire apparatus such complete overhauls 
are normally good for from four to six years, with minor repairs 
and adjustments in between. The morale of shops personnel is 
good, shown by a willingness of the men to do the best job they 
can with the poor equipment and facilities available, 

-8- 



Polico car wrecks are a matter of some concern. During 
1955-195& cars damaged in accidents numbered 6o, repair costs 
totaling $8,379- Twenty-six of the cars damaged in accidents 
were 1955 and 1956 models. 

Expenditures for materials and labor for maintenance of 
equipment by the Purchaser's shops last fiscal vear totaled 

Shops personnel includes throe foreman auto machinists, 
two sub-foreman auto machinists, twenty-five garagemen, three 
blacksmiths, four blacksmith finishers, thirty- three auto mach- 
inists, one batteryman-electrician, two pattern makers, four car 
and auto painters, two auto fender and body workers, one leather 
worker, nine machinists, one chauffeur and one laborer. 



INVENTORY 

The equipment inventory program for the fiscal year was 
concerned principally with the Public Welfare and Public Library 
departments and San Francisco International Airport, all of which 
were completed. Departments and offices rochecked and brought up 
to date were the Mayor, Board of Supervisors, Adult Probation and 
Purchasing Department. A complete rocheck was made of the Tax 
Collector's office and Sheriff's Department duo to a change in 
department heads. Investigation, follow-ups and adjustments were 
made to the perpetual inventory on missing or stolen equipment. 
All General Fund Departments now have been fully inventoried. 

Many transfers of equipment and supplies were made among 
departments . 

The Inventory Division has checked requisitions for equip- 
ment before purchases were mad3 to keep purchases In line with 
appropriations . 



STORES 

During the year the nineteen storerooms and warehouses of 
the Purchasing Department were reorganized and coordinated with a 
view toward more effective operations. 

A new position of Senior Storekeeper was established to ef- 
fect a closer liaison among the various storekeeping operations. 
Periodic audits of procedures are being made with the aim of hav- 
ing uniform and efficient procedures at all storekeeping stations, 

-9- 



A now warehouse is being planned by the Recreation and Park 
Department at Golden Gate Park which will be operated by Purchas- 
ing Department personnel. Likewise, a new cement and pipe yard 
is being planned adjacent to the Army Street Yard of the Depart- 
ment of Public Works which will be staffed by the Purchasing De- 
partment . 

The Sales - Inventory - Stores Division is staffed by the 
following permanent civil service personnel: 

1 - Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies 
1 - Senior Storekeeper 
8 - General Storekeepers 
l6 - Storekeepers 

1 - General Clerk-Stenographer 

2 - General Clerk-Typists 
1 - Laborer 

Storekeeping personnel were maintained in the fallowing 
locations to administer warehousing functions and distribution of 
City-owned material, equipment and supplies: 

Purchaser's Central Warehouse, 15th A Harrison Streets 
Shop No. 1, 313 Francisco Street 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City 
Laguna Hondo Home, 7th Avenue A Dewey Boulevard 
San Francisco Hospital, 1001 Potrero Avenue 
Recreation and Park Dept., Park Garage, Golden Gate Park 
Hetch Hctchy, I.locassin, California 

Aunicipal Railway, Elkton Yard, 9^4-9 Presidio Avenue, 
2i|.th & Utah Streets, Kirkland, North Point and Powell, 
Ocean and San Jose "-venues, 17th and Potrero, 17th and 
Potrero Transfer Room 
Water Department Yard, 639 Bryant Street 
Department of Electricity, 264. Golden Gate Avenue 
Department of Public Works, 2323 Army Street 



TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BURE AU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau provides a wide 
variety of centralized services one or more of which is usually 
required in the normal functions of a city department. The Bur- 
eau's operation eliminates unnecessary duplication of equipment 
and of the employment of specialized personnel by the various de- 
partments. 

At the present time the Bureau occupies three locations in 
the City Hall. However, consolidation of two of these is present- 



-10- 



ly under consideration. Such a novo, if made, will increase the 
efficiency of the Bureau's operations and provide for improved 
service to the departments. The services provided by the Bureau 
and the present locations in which they are housed are as follows; 

(1) Blueprinting Section is on the fifth floor of the 
City Kail and is equipped to process Elue Prints, 
Van Dyke Prints, Cloth Prints, Duplicate Tracings, 
Dri Prints, Vellums, etc. (To be moved if possible 
to the basement, adjacent to duplicating and photo- 
graphy. ) 

(2) Tabulating Section is in Room 158 on the first floor 
of the City Hall and is equipped to process all typos 
of IBM Machine Accounting. 

(3) Other Services — Photography, Photostating and Dup- 
licating—are in Room 50 in the basement of the 
City Hall. 

The Bureau has 2l\. permanent employees and the volume of 
work performed during the past fiscal year amounted to $S173,66)|. — 
an increase of 06,628 over the previous fiscal year. The regular 
staff of employees is augmented by temporary employments during 
peak periods. 

In order to forestall interruption of work for the depart- 
ments served, a program of replacement and modernization of ob- 
solete equipment is each year given careful consideration. Dur- 
ing the last fiscal year an ammonia process dri print machine was 
replaced in the blue print section to provide improved service of 
this type. During the present fiscal year, tabulating equipment 
that has been in use for over sixteen years will be replaced with 
more modern and efficient machines. 



CIVIL DEFENSE 

The Purchaser of Supplies is Chief of the Procurem-nt Div- 
ision of the San Francisco' Disaster Council and Corps. Key per- 
sonnel participated during the year in practice exercises and 
drills . 



J/,S /r^& ' 



"^^ 



B. G. KLINE 
PURCHASER OF SUPPLIES 



-11- 



SAN FRANCISCO 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



ANNUAL REPORT 



1956-1957 



This report is missing 



RO 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT 



/<?S7- 5 ¥ 



jAN i* A9S9 



September, 1958 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 



September 18, 1958 

Mr. Chester R. MacPhee 
Chief Administrative Officer 
289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. MacPhee: 

Herewith is the annual report of the Purchasing Department as 
requested by His Honor, Mayor George Christopher. The report covers the 
fiscal year 1957-58, ended June 30, 1958. 

This is the third annual report made by the present Purchaser of 
Supplies and will be his last due to his scheduled retirement next April 1. 

The three reports reflect the progress made toward better per- 
formance on the part of the Purchasing Department. It is anticipated 
that with the fine spirit shown by department personnel during the last 
year, and the continued improvement in techniques worked out in practice 
and staff conferences, the progress will continue. 

Just as purchasing is becoming recognized more and more in 
private business and industry to be a key to profits, it should be recog- 
nized in local government as a means of keeping costs within tolerable 
limits. The aim of the Purchasing Department is to procure materials, 
equipment and services meeting required standards of quality and service- 
ability at competitive prices. The cooperation of requisitioning depart- 
ments is essential if the aim is to be closely approached. 

I feel that it is mandatory that I ask for additional employ- 
ments in the Storekeeping Division at an early date. In that division, 
as you will note from the attached report and from a supplemental appro- 
priation request soon to be submitted, increased alertness and proficiency 
are offset to an extent by a shortage of personnel that hampers the impor- 
tant task of receiving, safeguarding, accounting for anldistributing 
supplies and equipment* 

I express my thanks to you for your confidence in retaining me 
in the position of Purchaser of Supplies, and my gratitude to Mr. T. A. 
Brooks, who retired as Chief Administrative Officer June 30, for his 
never failing help and support. 

Very truly yours, 



^'H^e 



B. G. Kline 
Purchaser of Supplies 



September, 1958 

ANNUAL RE FORT 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



While it continued to improve its performance, the Purchasing Depart- 
ment last fiscal year transacted more business, measured by dollar volume, than 
in any previous year since the city's centralized purchasing system was set up 
under the new charter in 1932. 

The total volume of purchases was $21,592,580, compared with 
£15,580,110 in 1956-57 and 4>lli,883,825 in 1955-56. The increase was due to 
heavy purchases for the Public Utilities Commission and to the general expansion 
of local government activities. An almost unbelievable variety of articles, 
commodities and services is included in the total. Purchase orders totaled 
kh f 7hh. 

Prices were not an important factor in the dollar volume increase, as 
generally they remained fairly steady for things the city purchases. The 
recession brought lower prices in many cases where the Purchasing Department was 
able to avoid proprietary purchases and through non-restrictive specifications to 
develop competition, thus offsetting some price increases. 

The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and con- 
tractual services for all departments of the City and County, including city- 
owned utilities, and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and 
maintains automotive and other equipment for the various departments except 
Public Utilities and for the School District as requested; operates a central 
tabulating and reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; 
transfers to other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no longer 
useful to any department of the city; maintains a perpetual inventory of equip- 
ment in the various departments; and operates central stores of the Purchasing 
and various other departments. 

The year was marked by further improvements and standardization of 
purchasing procedures and practices, the beginning of actual construction of 
new Purchaser's Consolidated Shops, and a definite tightening up on inspections 
of materials and equipment received* 

BUYING DIVISION 

Improved specifications were developed for fire hose, various types of 
flour, floor finishes, dormitory beds, school furniture, electric driers (hand 
and hair), and target arrows for City College, a minor item but one that had been 
troublesome in the past. 



Prior to developing the new fire hose specifications, with the full 
cooperation of the Fire Department, purchase of 22,000 feet of 2 3/h inch 
double jacketed cotton hose was made by use of the old specifications combined 
with a deviation clause which permitted seme departures from the technical 
details of manufacture so long as the hose met strict performance standards and 
tests. Making competitive bids possible resulted in a saving on one order of 
an estimated ^13,500. Similar savings will be made on future orders due to 
the improved, non-restrictive specifications. 

Specifications for Fire Department triple pumpers were similarly 
opened up, permitting competitive bids. The accepted low bid was &22,925 per 
unit, against *25,999 per unit for the only make that could have met the restric- 
tive specifications. The pumper accepted is a product of a leading manufacturer 
of fire fighting equipment. The indicated savings on the six units was in 
excess of 5j>19,000. Savings will be repeated in future years if open specifi- 
cations assure competitive bidding. 

New term contracts entered into included floor wax, diving service 
for the Coroner (to recover drowned bodies fron. the bay), gymnasium floor 
sealers and finishes, sound system maintenance in Civic Auditorium, photocopy 
paper and supplies, and fresh fruits and vegetables. 

Flacing of perishables under competitive bidding was a departure from 
all past practice. Heretofore fresh fruits and vegetables have been purchased 
for the various institutions against blanket monthly purchase orders distributed 
without competitive bidding among a number of suppliers. Quality was not 
specified, nor pricing method provided for. 

Under the new procedure bids are requested on supplying US Grade 1 
commodities at a bid discount from prevailing prices for merchandise of generally 
good merchantable quality; prevailing prices are determined from the daily 
Federal-State market news reports. A contract was entered into for San Fran- 
cisco Hospital with a reliable supplier at 15 per cent below prevailing prices, 
an excellent discount considering that the reported daily prevailing prices are 
for merchandise picked up at the Wholesale Produce District, whereas city perish- 
ables are delivered to the institution. (After the end of the fiscal year, 
prior to preparation of this report an 18-month contract based on an 18 per cent 
discount was entered into with a large, reputable supplier for Laguna Honda Home 
and Hassler Health Home.) 

On the basis of t he limited experience thus far it is indicated that 
the city will save 25 to 30 per cent on the purchase of perishables under the 
new system, or in the neighborhood of 5,20,000 to „25,000 a year, and receive 
commedities of a uniform high quality. 

The list of proprietary articles, which under the Purchasing Procedure 
Ordinance may be purchased w ithout competitive bids, was revised for the first 
time in many years. The list in accordance with the ordinance was approved by 
the Chief Administrative Officer and filed with the Controller. The items were 
quite strictly limited, as may be noted in the Purchaser's letter to the 
Controller in the appendix hereof » 



Stricter practice with regard to competitive bidding, as against 
brand name buying, has become more acceptable to requisitioning departments as 
cost savings have become evident and as Purchasing personnel has shown an in- 
creasing concern over and knowledge of the quality and usefulness of materials 
and equipment required by using departments. Standardization of materials and 
equipment in common use by various departments has become well accepted. 

Efforts are being made to correct some misunderstandings with requisi- 
tioning departments with regard to specifications and rush orders. Some speci- 
fications submitted describe in detail a particular make or brand of article 
desired rather than specifying what is desired and listing required character- 
istics, with or without a make and model number to denote desired quality. 
Restrictive specifications have had to be rejected or revised. 

Some department's specifications have had to be revised because they 
contained bid conditions and oth r material that properly belongs, if used at 
all, in the Purchaser's Contract Proposal rather than in the specifications. 
Efforts continue to be made toward a mutual understanding on this problem. 

The Purchasing Department regularly handles such emergencies as break- 
downs of equipment, immediate requirements due to storms or other emergencies, 
and urgent needs due to unforeseeable conditions, but is not staffed to handle 
all purchase requisitions as though emergencies existed. At times, it appears 
to the Purchasing Department, the urgency of a requisitioning department's 
needs is due to oversight or failure to plan ahead. It is not always practic- 
able to drop other work and expedite such purchases. 

Relations with suppliers were good despite a more pronounced desire 
for city business, due to the recession, than in many prior years. Bidders 
who have had complaints have been convinced that the same rules apply to all. 
It is felt that suppliers are satisfied as to the Purchasing Department's 
fairness. No bidder is denied a patient hearing in case of a misunderstanding. 
Greater insistence is being made with regard to promised delivery dates. 

Additional commodities were placed on a monthly definite quantity 
proposal basis in the interest of efficient and orderly purchasing. They 
included paint and painters' supplies, plumbing materials and supplies, elec- 
trical materials and supplies, (other than those under term contract), dry goods 
and wearing apparel, athletic supplies and recreational equipment, and food 
products. Notices to requisitioning departments in that regard are contained 
in the appendix to this report. 

A new technique that was inaugurated and is proving helpful was the 
extension of definite quantity contracts to cover occasional recurring purchases 
during the fiscal year. The new procedure eliminates the necessity of calling 
for bids on isolated items after the city's main requirements for the year have 
been contracted for, and obtains auantity prices for additional individual units 
later required. The technique has been applied for example to automobiles and 
office equipment and furniture. 

Continued efforts are being made to develop standards for commodities 
in use by various departments through cooperation of Purchasing and requisition- 
ing department personnel. A successful example last year was heavy duty motor 



oil. As a result of work by a buyer from this office, the Superintendent of 
Shops, Purchasing Department, and the Superintendent of Equipment, Municipal 
Railway, the specifications for heavy duty motor oil were improved, and the 
number of classifications on the term contract was reduced from five to one and 
the number of items from 11 to two» The price range had been 31»2 to 50.5 cents 
per gallon; the new term price is 33 »U cents for a standard high quality oil. 
The city is benefitting from the strict quality standard and the better quantity 
price through competitive bidding. 

The Purchasing Department suggests alternate standards or types of 
material to using departments whenever it sees the possibility of obtaining 
better buys without sacrifice of quality. An example last year was a suggestion 
that resulted in a saving of ^12,8I4i in the purchase of centrifugally cast 
instead of pit cast high pressure water pipe for the Department of Public Works. 
The specifications were changed only with the approval of the Public Works Depart- 
ment after careful research and study. 

Some unusual purchases last year were: 

Removing and impounding vehicles—new contract for three years for 
towing and storing automobiles from tow-away zones, in front of driveways, or 
other places where they are illegally parked; 

Turbines and related items for Hetch Hetchy's Cherry Valley generating 
station, S2,U27»2ltO; contract contains an escalation clause based upon govern- 
ment statistics; 

Transmission towers for the Cherry Valley project, &366,61j5; 

Short wave radio system for the Police Department, &228,795; contract 
based upon specifications prepared by the Department of Electricity, which will 
operate and maintain the system; Allen B. Du Mont Laboratories received the 
award. 

INSPECTIONS 

The activities of the department's storekeeping personnel are covered 
in a separate section of this report, but it is fitting to mention here the great 
improvement in morale and proficiency of the storekeepers and general store- 
keepers during the last year and the excellent work that has been done in 
inspecting materials and equipment received for the departments they serve. It 
is well recognized now that ordering is only half of a purchase transaction; the 
other half, just as important, is to make sure the city receives the quality and 
quantity ordered. 

Except where Purchasing Department personnel operates central stores 
receiving departments have the responsibility of checking deliveries against 
orders and specifications. 

The Purchaser of Supplies takes this opportunity to thank the adminis- 
trative and supervisory employes who report directly to him, and the entire staff 
of the Purchasing Department, for their loyalty, cooperation and alertness. 
Reporting directly to the Purchaser of Supplies were: 



Frank Conway, Chief Assistant Purchaser of Supplies; A. W. Petan, 
General Superintendent of Shops; James E. Leary, Supervisor of Equipment and 
Supplies; George Stanley, Supervisor, Reproduction and Tabulating Bureau; 
Vf. W. Lewis, Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies; and James Brackett, Head 
Clerk. 

Present assignments of personnel of the Purchasing Department are as 
follows: Central Office and Purchasing Division, l|ii, including four supervisory 
employes, seven assistant purchasers (buyers) one printing and stationery buyer 
and one assistant stationery buyer; Sales, Stores and Inventory Supervisor's 
Office, 5; storekeeping, 39; Central Shops, 91; Tabulating and Reproduction 
Bureau, 2k} total 203. 

The Purchaser of Supplies took an active part in the annual meetings 
of the National Institute of Governmental Purchasing and the California State, 
County and Municipal Purchasing Agents' Association. 



SALES, INVENTORY AND STORES DIVISION 



SALES 



Thirty-five sales were conducted in 1957 - 1958. Total revenue from 
sales was £96,517.29. All sales were of personal property, unfit or unnecessary 
for the use of the City and County of San Francisco and were made underthe 
authority of Section 88 of the Charter. 

Some unusual personal property disposed of this year included such 
"collector's items" as Merry-Go-Round Organs from Golden Gate Park and Fleish- 
hacker Zoo, "Birdcage" type Traffic Signals and various Objects of Art from the 
de Young Museum. Other unique sales disposed of a Baseball Back Stop, Church 
Windows, a Map of San Francisco and wool from the Golden Gate Park Flock. 

The sale of Agricultural Products conducted for the Water Department 
was broken down into four individual sales, held as each crop ripened - 285.609 
tons, netting &7, 01*9.30. 

The sales program again included the sale of passenger automobiles 
which heretofore had been traded in on the purchase of new cars. 102 automobiles 
were sold and the results were quite satisfying, returning to the city, we feel, 
mere value than could be experienced by "trade in" procedure. 

Besides conducting sale s, the Sales Division has made considerable 
research into various legal aspects affected by different sales, has male all 
preliminary surveys and inspections, prepared all information and specifications, 
collected and deposited all money received from sales with the City Treasurer, 
and kept all records and correspondence attendant to sales. 

INVENTORY 

The equipment inventory program for the fiscal year, 1957 - 1958, was 
concerned principally with the following departments, some of which were resur- 
veyed completely or spot checked: 



Planning Commission, Public Administrator, Chief Administrative Officer, Inter- 
national Airport, Laguna Honda Home, Purchasing Department, Recreation a nd Park 
Department and general Automobile Inventory. 

Other miscellaneous departments had most of their new equipment tagged and 
labeled this year. Investigation, follow-ups and adjustments were made to the 
perpetual inventory on missing or stolen equipment in accordance with standard 
procedure 3 

This Division supervised the moving and transferring of equipment for 
several departments during the fiscal year including Shop 2, Purchasing Depart- 
ment, from 660 Chestnut Street to the Palace of Fine Arts; Shop 3, Purchasing 
Department, from 1?U5 California Street to the Palace of Fine Artsj Department 
of Electricity, from 26U Golden Gate Avenue to 17^5 California Streetj the 
Employe's Retirement System, from McAllister Street to the Civic Auditorium; 
Bureau of Traffic Engineers, from the City Hall to McAllister Street y Bureau of 
Fltmbin£ Inspection, from 101 Grove Street to Second Floor, City Hall. Many 
other smaller moves were effected for miscellaneous departments. 

Through the Equipment Inventory Division surplus equipment discarded 
by various departments, no longer suited for their use, was rehabilitated, 
scrapped or sold. Rehabilitated furniture and equipment valued at i>9,212 was 
returned to use in other departments. 

Permits for the operation of vending machines on city property, in 
accordance with Ordinance No. 6562, were kept current, necessitating close co- 
operation with the California State Department of Rehabilitation. Additional 
vending machines and new locations were added as requested and approved. 

Since January, 1 Q 57, the automobile control desk has been a responsi- 
bility of this division. The inventory was placed on IBM cards, providing a 
more practical, comprehensive and flexible system in dealing with the acquisition, 
assignment, licensing, insurance and disposition of the city's automobile fleet. 

Personnel shortage has hampered inventory work, although the perpetual 
inventory source material was maintained in the files. There is a backlog of 
work locating, identifying, labeling and subsequent tabulation for inclusion on 
IBM cards, the equipment in the various departments. 

We will resume our inventory duties when our schedules provide the 
necessary time or when it is possible to suspend work on other equally important 
projects or when it is essential that departmental inventories be taken. 

The Inventory Division, during the past year, has been a source of 
help to various cities and communities in the State and Nation, in providing them 
with a manual of procedure and sitting in on educational conferences in the 
practical application of our manual to their systems. 



STORES 

Uniform and systematic procedures have been inaugurated or improved 
upon in the Storekeeping Division, including a rigid program for the inspection 
of material and supplies received. This activity has resulted in many rejec- 
tions of supplies not meeting the standards, weights or specifications required 
by the purchase orders. A more comprehensive control on blanket order purchases 
and purchases at the institutions has also oeen effected. 

Good progress has been made toward the complete integration of the 
storerooms into the Purchasing Department. Heretofore hospital porters 
served in a storekeeping capacity at Laguna Honda Home and San Francisco Hospital. 

Following a Civil Service Commission survey 8 Porters and 2 Sub-foreman 
Porters were returned to the institutions for duty within their classification 
and 5 Storekeepers replaced them in jobs that were within the storekeeping 
classification. This resulted in a more orderly operation of the storerooms, 

A position of General Storekeeper was created in the Sheriff's Depart- 
ment to handle the requisitioning, ordering, receiving, distribution of mater- 
ials, supplies and equipment for all the county jails replacing a bookkeeper 
and clerk. It is hoped that further savings may be made in the Sheriff's 
budget by placing another storekeeper at the jails to take over storekeeping 
duties now performed by two higher priced jailers. 

The vacation season has worked a hardship on our Storekeeping Division 
inasmuch as there is not adequate personnel for relief, nor is there any 
flexible arrangement or relief of employes due to sick leave. One extra 
position of storekeeper is needed to cover such inadaquacy. 

The Single Men's Rehabilitation Center at Redwood City, under the 
Public Welfare Department, has continued to render assistance to the Purchasing 
Department in rehabilitation of furniture and office equipment* 

The Stores Division is facing a definite expansion program. Hew and 
modern storekeeping facilities have been installed at Laguna Honda Home; the 
Golden Gate Park warehouse -will be completed this winter; new and enlarged 
storerooms will be included in the new Consolidated Shops now being built; new 
warehouses are proposed at the Department of Public Works yard, at the new Hall 
of Justice and at San Francisco International Airport. 

The morale of the Stores Division is at a high peak since the reorgan- 
ization of the Division. Regular staff meetings are held for the discussion 
of subjects pertinent to our operations. A very successful safety program has 
been inaugurated and a representative of the Storekeepers is in regular attend- 
ance at the periodic local meetings of the National and State Safety Council. 

All General Storekeepers have been encouraged to visit plants and read 
trade publications to broaden their knowledge on storekeeping subjects. They 
registered for and attended the Western Packaging & Materials Handling Exposition, 
held this year at the Civic Auditorium. 



PERSONNEL 



The Sales - Inventory - Stores Division is staffed by the following 
permanent civil service personnel: 

1 - Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies 
1 - Senior Storekeeper 

1 - General Clerk-Stenographer 

2 - General Clerk-Typists 
9 - General Storekeepers 

29 - Storekeepers 
1 - Laborer 

The following locations are staffed and operated by stores personnel, 



Main Office 

Central Warehouse 
Sub-stores 

Fire Dept. Central Stores 

Water Dept. Central Stores 

Dept. of Public Works 
Central Stores 



Room 221, City Hall 

15th and Harrison Streets 
Room 5, City Hall 

313 Francisco Street 
639 Bryant Street 
2323 Army Street 



Hetch Hetchy Central Stores Moccasin, California 



Health Department 
Central Stores 



Public Welfare Dept. 
Central Stores 

S.F, International Airport 
Central Stores 

Recreation & Park Dept. 
Central Stores 

Dept. of Electricity 
Central Stores 

Municipal Railway 
Central Stores 



Transfer Room 
Storage Yard 

Sheriff's Department 
General Stores 



S. F. Hospital, 22nd St. & Potrero Avenue 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 
Hassler Health Home, Redwood City, California 



Single Men's Rehabilitation Center, Redwood City 

S.F. Int'l Airport, South San Francisco, Calif. 

Golden Gate Park Yard - 3rd Ave. & South Drive 

26U Golden Gate Avenue 

2Uth and Utah Streets 
Hampshire and Mariposa Streets 
Geary and Presidio 
Kirkland Yard 
575 Ocean Avenue 
Geneva and San Jose 
Hampshire and Mariposa Streets 
Elkton Station 

County Jails, San Francisco & San Mateo Counties 



8 



CENTRAL SHOPS 

The Purchaser's Central Shops, responsible for equipment maintenance 
for the various departments of the City and County, and as requested for the 
Unified School District, had a busy year under somewhat trying circumstances* 

Originally budgeted funds for departments served were insufficient for 
the maintenance and repair of the automotive and other equipment for which the 
shops are responsible, and various departments had to obtain supplemental 
appropriations or transfers. The work force is about equal to the work that 
has to be done, but the funds originally appropriated for a fiscal year normally 
are not sufficient to meet the payroll for 12 months. 

The inadequacy and scattered locations of the shops have been described 
in previous reports; during the year under review the situation was complicated 
by the necessity of moving Shop No. 2, which maintains equipment for Public 
Works and other departments, from its temporary location at 660 Chestnut Street 
to the Palace of Fine Arts, which has adequate space, but is lacking in pits, 
hoists and other facilities and is slightly exposed to the weather — and pigeons. 

To save rent and begin the actual consolidation of the Purchaser's 
Shops, Shop No. 3 was moved from a leased building at 17h5 California Street to 
the Palace of Fine Arts, which of course will only be occupied until the new 
Consolidated Shop Buildings in the South-East section of the city are completed. 
The new shops are under construction at a total cost of about &1, 000,000 and are 
expected to be ready for occupancy next spring. For the first time since the 
1931 charter consolicated the Central Shops on paper, they will be consolidated 
actually and physically. 

Important economies and efficiencies are expected to result. 

The Central Shops maintain about 1200 motor vehicles of all types, 
not including those of the Recreation and Park Department, which are repaired 
and serviced by Purchasing Department shop personnel in Golden Gate Park. Fire, 
Police and Public "forks cars, trucks and special equipment comprise the bulk of 
the repair work, followed by Public Health, TJelfare, the Sheriff and other 
departments. 

Activities of the Shops are of a never ending variety, including 
inventions, improvizations and manufacturing. A trailer dolly for hauling 
disabled three-rrheel motorcycles for the Police Department, a coin dryer for the 
Parking Meter Section of the Tax Collector's Office, and a vacuum easel for use 
in microfilming documents in the Reproduction Bureau are a few special jobs. 

The car and tender trucks on the train at Fleishhacker Playground 
started to fall apart sometime ago. New ones made by the Central Shops of steel 
and old Ford front coil springs, with ball bearings installed in the wheels and 
one wheel left free to differentiate on the curves are doing an excellent job 
and have eliminated friction to the point that the locomotive could haul an addi- 
tional car without strain. 



Expenditures for materials and labor during the fiscal year totaled 
5700,875, as against $709*202 for the previous year, as follows: 

SHOP NO. 1 



7JAGES 
(130) 


CONTRACT 

SERVICES 

(200) 


FIXED 
LiATERIAL CHARGES 
(300) (800) 

(Budget Transfers) 


P k L 
(110) 


TOTAL 


233,119.00 


51,670.00 


9U,53U.CO 3,2U5.00 
(T/ork Orders) 


15,129.00 


397,697.00 


23,062.00 
256,181.00 


1,118.00 
52,788.00 


5,361.00 2,931.00 
99,895.00 6,176.00 

SHOP NO. 2 


1,611.00 
16,7U0.00 


3U,083.CO 
Ul, 780.00 



(Budget Transfers) 

181,631.00 11^,975.00 57,9U1.00 6,353.00 260,900.00 

(Work Orders) 

5,719.00 -0- 1,766.00 710.00 8,195.00 

187,350.00 m,975.00 59,707.00 7,063.00 269,095.00 

Grand total 700,875.00 

Funds for equipment maintenance and repair are provided by appropria- 
tions to the various departments and transfers to the Purchasing Department and 
to a less extent by Work Orders for special jobs. 

Besides the motor propelled vehicles, the Central Shops, sub-shops and 
garages are responsible for the maintenance and repair of Fire Department inhala- 
tors and breathing equipment, two high pressure pumping stations, tanks and 
stand-by stations, equipment on the fire boat Phoenix, communications stand-by 
plant at the Youth Guidance Center (CD), five engine driven sirens (CD) and 19 
auxiliary CD fire trucks. 

The Third Street Channel Bridge, equipment at the three sewage treat- 
ment plants, Park equipment (locomotive and train, merry-go-rounds, ferris wheels), 
zoo equipment, parking meter collection cans and carts, golf course and play- 
ground equipment, park sludge pumps and sprinkler equipment, and miscellaneous 
machines and mechanical equipment for various departments, including schools. 

In last years report attention was called to the fact that the Bureau 
of Street Repair, Department of Public Uorks, has no spare equipment. The 
situation still exists. As a consequence the shops are overloaded with 
emergency jobs and no proper maintenance can be done because the equipment has 
to be rushed back into service. This works a hardship on both the shops and 
the using department, and is an unsatisfactory and expensive way to operate. 



10 



The shops personnel consists of the following classifications under tho 
direction and supervision of a General Superintendent of Shops: 

3 - M-55 Automotive Machinist Foremen 

2 - M-57 Automotive Machinist Sub-foremen 
25 - J-66 Garagemen 

3 - M-108 Blacksmiths 

h - M-107 Blacksmith Finishers 
33 - M-5U Automotive Machinists 

1 - E-10U Batteryman-filectrician 

2 - A-156 Patternmakers 

3 - A-36I4. Car and Auto Painters 

2 - M-60 Auto Fender & Body workers 

1 - 0-108 Leather worker 

9 - M-25U Machinists (1 vacancy at present, no list). 

1 - 0-1 Chauffeur 

1 - J-l; Laborer 

TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau of the Purchasing Department 
has 2U permanent employees. The gross amount of work performed during the 
fiscal year 1957-1958 amounted to $188,867. 25, an increase of $>9>876.25 over the 
prior fiscal year and an increase of $21,830.25 over a three-year period. The 
regular staff of employes is augmented by temporary employments during peak 
periods. 

Service is provided through the use of Interdepartmental Work Orders 
and Budget Transfers. Approximately fifty city and county departments and 
major departmental bureaus make regular use of the facilities of the Bureau. 
This is not surprising as one or more of the wide variety of services provided 
by the Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau is usually required in the normal 
functions of a city department » 

Operation of the Bureau saves the City and County a considerable sum 
of money each year as its operation eliminates unnecessary duplication of equip- 
ment and the employment of specialized personnel by many departments who have 
need for the service but do not have sufficient vo.lume of work to justify full 
time employments. 

Functions of a continuing or recurring nature performed by the Bureau 
are: IBM processing of traffic citations for the Municipal Court and Police 
Department] sales and license tax accounting for the Tax Collector; hospital 
records for the Health department; reproducing block books for the Assessor , 
Real Estate, Recorder, Public Works and Tax Collector; annual reproduction of 
the City and County Budget; blueprinting in connection with the construction 
and maintenance of City and County Buildings including Schools; photography in 
connection with construction progress, accidents, claims; and IBM data pro- 
cessing, blueprinting, Ozalid reproductions, offset press work, mimeographing 
and photography for the various departments* 



11 



PURCHASING STATISTICS 





1957-58 

Purchase 

Orders Amount 


1956-57 
Purchase 
Orders Amount 


General 


16,575 


$ 6,61*5,91*6 


15,672 


$ 5,629,872 


Education 


5,760 


2,673,705 


5,310 


2,586,671* 


Health 


1*,620 


1,996,581* 


l*,538 


1,71*8,996 


Utilities 


6,099 


9,969,790 


5,781 


1*,258,837 


Petty Purchase 
Orders (Not 
exceeding 
£50) 11,690 


306,555 


12,688 


355,731 


Total 


hk,7hh 


$21,592,580 


1*3,989 


115,580,110 



SALES FIGURES 

Metal Scrap and Salvage • $1*0,975*26 

Motor Coaches, Armatures, Engines & Misc. Parts ••...•• 15,932.82 

Used Automobiles ••• ..••• 13,97l**36 

Agricultural Products 7,01*9*30 

Submarine and College Hill Pipelines ••» 6,257*71 

Dried Sewage Sludge •• 3,1*63*78 

Objects of Art 2,538,92 

Grease and Bones ••.»...............•.•••••.• 1,123*62 

Sacks and Containers ••••••••••• l,051**6l 

Merry-Go-Round Organs ••••••..*•••••••«•••••••. ••• 936*00 

Traffic Signals * 907*67 

Swill , 900,00 

Boat Engine 1*50.00 

Waste Paper , 289*51 

Wool , 269*60 

Baseball Back Stop • 110.21* 

Church Windows •*•••••••• •••••••••••...• •• 69*68 

Map of San Francisco 10.00 

Miscellaneous Revenue ........».*.....«. ........•• 20l*.01 

TOTAL REVENUE FROM SALES $96,517*29 



12 



EXPENDITURES 



Comparison of Expenditures with original budget for all appropriations except 
Personal Services for 1957-58: 



Under Over 

$ 720 
7kk 



Account 


Budgeted 


Expended 


Contractual Services 
7.311.200.000 


$21,1*30 


$22,150 


Materials & Supplies 
7.311.300.000 


10,300 


11,01*1* 


Equipment 
7.311.U00.311 


2,996 


2,678 


Premium on Official Bonds 
7.311.812,311 


7,500 


8,01*2 


Premium on Auto Insurance 
7.311.813.311 


18,500 


18,1*90 


Membership Dues 
7.311.85U.311 


750 


755 



$318 



10 



51*2 



Total $61,1*76 $63,159 $328 $2,011 





REVENUES 








Comparison of Revenues with Estimated 


Revenues in 


1957-58 Budget: 




Account 


Estimated 
Revenue 




Actual 
Revenue 


Over 

Estimated 


Under 

Estimated 


7061 Sale of Documents 


$ 500 




$ 1,622 




$1,122 


7062 Minor Sales 


3,375 




U,U86 




1,111 


7063 Damages 


208 




51*2 




33k 


7061* Miscellaneous Sales 






30 




30 


7U51 Sale of Sludge 


U,832 




3,125 


$1,707 




7621 Sale of Grease 
Ǥt Bones 


5,922 




2,02a 


3,898 





Total $ll*,837 $11,829 $5,605 $2,597 



n 



APPENDIX 



City and County of San Francisco 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 CITY HALL 
ZONE 2 



March 20, 1958 



Mr. Karry D. Ross, Controller 
City and County of San Francisco 
109 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Ross: 

The following list of articles which I define as proprietary 
is hereby filed with you in accordance with Section 107 »3 of Part I, 
Article 2, Municipal Code. This list replaces completely any and all 
such lists previously filed with you under the code section referred to. 

Articles in the categories listed herein ?dll be purchased in 
the open market, without competitive bids, only when it is determined by 
the Purchaser of Supplies that there is no acceptable substitute for the 
make or brand, or particular item, requisitioned and that there are no 
alternate sources of supply* 



Charts 

Globes (Geographical) 

Maps 

Books 

Magazines and periodicals 

Plays (dramatic) 

Works of Art 

Music 

Tests, Intelligence 

Medicines 

Medical Equipment 

Articles for test purposes 



Surgical Equipment and 
Instruments 

Class "D" automobiles 

Equipment that must intermem- 

ber with equipment previously 

installed 

Parts for equipment and systems 

now in use 

Materials and supplies for 
equipment and systems now in use 

Mimeograph ink 

Equipment, materials and supplies 
f^r instructional purposes 



Zoo animals 

Very truly yours f 

B. G. Kline 
Purchaser of Supplies 



APPROVED: 

T. A. Brooks 



Chief Administrative Officer 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 



June 2, 1958 



To eliminate the vraste in repetitious buying, and to give 
better service to requisitioning departments, the Purchasing Depart- 
ment is inaugurating a system of monthly purchases of the commodity 
classes listed below. On the basis of requisitions received, bid 
invitations will be mailed to suppliers on the day of the month fol- 
lowing each commodity class: 

Dry Goods and Hearing Apparel 10th of month 

Athletic Supplies, Games and 

Recreation Equipment 20th of month 

Food and Food Products Last day of month 

Requisitions for items on existing term contracts trill be 
processed upon receipt in this office, and requisitions of unusual 
nature trill be given special handling if required by the amount or 
character of the materials requisitioned or urgency of the need* 

The cooperation of requisitioning departments is requested, 
especially in planning ahead to anticipate their requirements. It 
Tri.ll be helpful if departments will forward their requisitions well 
in advance, when possible, of dates shown so that any questions re- 
garding their requisitions can be resolved prior to these dates. 



Very truly yours, 




B. G. Kline 
Purchaser of Supplies 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 



March lli, 1958 



To eliminate the -waste in repetitious buying, and to give 
better service to requisitioning departments, the Purchasing Depart- 
ment is inaugurating a system of monthly purchases of the commodity 
classes listed belor;. On the basis of requisitions received, bid 
invitations Trill be mailed to suppliers on the day of the month fol- 
lowing each commodity class: 

Paint and painters' supplies 10th of month 

Plumbing materials and supplies 20th of month 

Electrical materials and supplies Last day of month 

Requisitions for items on existing term contracts will be 
processed upon receipt in this office, and requisitions of unusual 
nature will be given special handling if required by the amount or 
character of the materials requisitioned or urgency of the need. 

The cooperation of requisitioning departments is requested, 
especially in planning ahead to anticipate their requirements. It 
will be helpful if departments will forward their rsnuisitions well 
in advance, when possible, of dates shown so that any questions re- 
garding their requisitions can be resolved prior to those dates» 

Very truly yours, 



B. G. Kline 
Purchaser of Supplies 



F 
! 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT 



DOCUMENTS 
OCT 13 1961 



SAN FRANCISCO 
eUBLIC LIBRARY. 



September, 1959 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 



September 8, 1959 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1958-59 

Mr. Sherman P. Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Duckel: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1959 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

This report reflects in a great measure the fine work of the Department 
under Mr. B. G. Kline who retired as Purchaser of Supplies on Liarch 30, 
1959. The policies initiated under Mr. Kline on co.modity buying on 
term contracts and on competitive bidding have resulted in material 
savings to the City. 

The new Consolidated Shops at 800 Quint Street, initiated under Mr. Kline, 
were completed in June 1959 and the move from Shops 1, 2 and 3 to the new- 
location started that month. It is expected that better and more effic- 
ient service will be rendered with these new and expanded facilities. 

During my short tenure I have become increasingly aware that the shortage 
of storekeeping personnel adversely affects the proper receiving, safe- 
guarding accounts, and distributing of materials and supplies. Addition- 
al personnel for these functions must be obtained to protect property and 
for efficient operations. 

The following statements on the activities of the Department for the past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, 
dated August 15, 1959. 

1. The new Consolidated Shops, representing an expenditure of about 
$950,000, were completed by contract under the Department of 
Public ^Torks on June 1959. 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the Department, as stated 
in the Annual Report include: 

(a) Reorganization of the Department to provide for better 
functional and personnel control. 



Mr. Sherman P. Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer September 8, 1959 

(b) Establishment of a specification and control section for 
buying 

(c) Additional storekeeping personnel. 

(d) Establishment of definite policies on equipment replacement. 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other than 
those for personal services with original budget appropriations 
for 1958-1959 is given in the appendix, Annual Report. Funds 
for departments activities are obtained mainly by transfers from 
budget appropriations of other departments. 

Ill The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget 
of 1958-59 is given in the appendix, Annual Report. 

5. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive 

and other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduction, 
should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in work 
required, and for steadily increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the Annual 
Report. 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank you for your confidence in me on 
my recent appointment and to Mir. T. F. Conway, other bureau heads, and to 
the employees of the Purchasing Department for their cooperation and 
loyalty without which the Department could not function as efficiently and 
as effectively. 

Very truly yours, 

BEN BENAS 

Purchaser of Supplies 



September, 1959 
ANNUAL REPORT 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department, under the Chief Administrative Officer in accordance 
with Charter provisions, purchases materials and supplies, equipment and con- 
tractual services for all departments for the City and County, including city- 
owned utilities, and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and 
maintains automotive and other equipment for the various departments except 
Public Utilities and for the School District as requested; operates a central 
tabulating and reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; 
transfers to other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no 
longer useful to any department of the city; maintains a perpetual inventory of 
equipment in the various departments; and operates central stores of the Purchas- 
ing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on new 
products, specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 201 in five bureaus, the same as in 1957-58. 
The organization of the Department is shown on the Organization Chart in the 
appendix. 

Supervisory - June 30» 1959 

Administrative 

B, Benas - Purchaser of Supplies - Appointed U/l/59 
H. Shiman - Secretary 



Bureaus 



Buying 

T. F. Conway - Chief Assistant Purchaser - Bureau Head & Asst. Dept.Head 
"V. W. Lewis - Senior Assistant Purchaser 
A. K. Arnold - Head Clerk 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. E. Leary - Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies - Bureau Head 
H. R. Stevens - Senior Storekeeper 



Bureaus - Continued 

Pe rsonnel and Accounts 

J. Brackett - Head Clerk - Bureau Head 
Shops 

A. W» Petan - Superintendent of Shops - Bureau Head 
J. Fischer - Foreman Auto Machinist 

R. Johnstone - Foreman Auto Machinist 

B. Shain - Foreman Auto Machinist 

Tabulating and Reproduction 

G. A. Stanley - Supervisor of Reproduction - Bureau Head 
J. W. Bender - Supervisor of Tabulating 

The valued services of the following were separated from city employ- 
ment through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment: 



Name 


Position 


Approx .Years 
City Service 


Date 


Retired 








B. G. Kline 


Purchaser of Supplies 


19 


U-l-59 


J. M. Adams 


Auto Machinist 


31 


3-1-59 


H. W. Blagg 


Ba tt e ryman-E lectrician 


27 


3-1-59 


N. H. Pettit 


Assistant Purchaser 


81 


U-l-59 


Died 








0. R. Nicholson 


Auto Machinist 


11; 


7-7-58 


N. Giradot 


Storekeeper 


lUi 


3-21-59 



Mr. Ben G. Kline retired as Purchaser of Supplies on April 1, 1959 
after 19 years of city service including three years as Purchaser of Supplies. 
His service and leadership are in a large measure responsible for the present 
effectiveness and efficiency of the Department. It is expected that continuing 
and expanding the policies initiated by Mr. Kline will result in better service 
and material savingso 

Work Accomplished 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail 
under the separate bureaus, remained substantially the same as in 1957-1958. 
Major accomplishments are indicated in the following table: 



Unit 


1957-1958 


1958-1959 


Purchase Orders 


hk,7hk 


U;,068 


Amount 


$21,592,500 


$20,632,000 


Sales Number 
Sales Amount 
Major Stores Operated 


35 
96,520 

15 


25 

$205,870 
16 


Job Orders 
Expenditures 


6,226 
$700,875 


6,559 
$705,067 


Expenditures-Tabulating 
Expenditure s-Reproduct: 


I 498,130 
Lon C90,7UO 


$10ii,l80 
$97,070 



Bureau 
Buying 

Equipment and Supplies 

Shops 

Tabulating and 
Reproduction 

General Comments 

Further improvements in standard routine and purchasing procedures and 
practices continued. A specification and control section was formed for studies 
which cannot be done by buyers without impairing their work accomplishment. The 
need for additional personnel for this function is clearly apparent, in view of 
rapid technological advances in processes, equipment, and materials and supplies. 

There is a critical need for 2 General Storekeepers and 5 Storekeepers to 
meet the Purchaser's responsibilities for adequate control of supplies and equip- 
ment for the various departments at the new Pprk Central Stores, Hetch Hetchy 
stores, Laguna Konda Home, County Jail, Consolidated Shops, and for vacation 
relief and inventory. The Bureau should be reorganized to provide more direct 
assistance to the Bureau Head, more direct supervision of storekeeping and addition- 
al personnel for inventory control. 

The consolidation of shop facilities at the new Shops, 800 Quint Street, 
brought out strongly the need for revision in functional control and reclassifi- 
cation of some supervisory personnel. Some equipment in service for many years, 
now obsolete, should be replaced. A study is being conducted by contract, under 
the Controller, on fiscal storekeeping and accounting procedures which is expected 
will result in improvements in these functions. 

No changes in number or classification of personnel for Tabulating or 
Reproduction Bureau are indicated except one blueprint operator should be reclassi- 
fied to a sub-foreman operator to provide supervision in the blueprint room on 
the fifth floor of the City Hall. The blueprinting facilities should be relocated 
to the basement of the City Hall to provide easy access and better control. 

Clerical and accounting personnel are now under the separate bureaus. 
A preliminary study indicates that placing these employments under one head for 
administrative control gives more flexibility, allrws better use, particularily 
when employees are off for sickness and vacations, and will result in more effi- 
cient operations. 



STUPES AMD IMPROVEMENTS 
Studies and improvements scheduled for the fiscal year 1959-60 include: 
I» Studies 

A. On departmental reorganization. 

B. On review of departmental procedures to: 

1. Reduce and simplify forms used 

2. Minimize the number of purchase orders issued 

3. Decrease time for processing purchase orders 
It. Assign or reassign work for greater efficiency 
5. Uniform storekeeping systems. 

C. On quantity purchasing in relation to usage and stores. 

D. On use of Purchaser's Revolving Fund. 

E. On replacement of automotive and other equipment. 

F. On determination of locations to best service automotive vehicles 
considering use of credit cards where applicable. 

G. On revision of personal car mileage rates. 

H. On desirability of city typewriter maintenance versus outside contracli 
II. Improvements 

A. To storage facilities at various locations. 

B. To central shops. 

C. To main office. 

CIVIL DEFENSE 



Planning and programming of Purchasing Department Civil Defense activ- 
ities continued to acquaint all employees with their role in case of alert or 
attack. Meetings were held with Civil Defense officials and other departments 
to discuss supply and procurement procedures and practices. A plan of action was 
formulated including assignment of key personnel to major assembly points, and 
assignment of others depending on their work and function. 

To assure that the Department is adequately informed, to develop proper 
plans with changing programs and to correlate this Departments activities with 
others, Mr. Claude P. ^"ebster was assigned as Civil Defense Co-ordinator 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, 
contracts for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco Unified 
School District. Except for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all 
buying starts Tilth receipt of requisition from the using department. Included in 
or incidental to the procurement function are the following: 

I. Buying - Bids and Awards 

A. Preparation of bids: 

1. Technical specifications 

2. Contractual conditions 
3. Advertising and mailing bids 

C. Opening and tabulating bids 

D. Review and award of bids 

1. Determination of suitability of alternate offers 

a. Review of specifications and information furnished by bidder 

b. Laboratory and operating tests 

c. Investigation of use by others 

d. Other investigations and analysis 

2. Determination of bid compliance with legal and contractual 
requirements. 

E. Preparation of contracts 
II. Buying - Related Functions 

A. Specifications and control 

1. Analysis of records of average use 

2. Specifications 

a. Development and revision 

1». Maintenance of specification file 



II. Buying - Related Functions - Continued 
3. Inception of new term contracts 

a. Determination of desirability 

b. Preparation of technical specifications and contractual 
conditions. 

U. Review of: 

a. Policies 

b. Methods 



The Buying Division is headed by the Chief Assistant Purchaser and 
includes 10 assistant purchasers and a clerical staff of 11 engaged in typing, 
nailing, opening and tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file 
and typing contracts. Funds for sor.ie of these employments, both buying and 
clerical, are provided by other departments. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the over-all progress and problems. 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for items 
of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period make it 
advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for equip- 
ment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standardization and 
economy. 

Yearly increases in departmental budgets for articles or services to be 
procured by the Purchaser with no increase in buying personnel have resulted in 
delays in buying. Accelerated technical advancement in various fields (such as 
plastics and electronics) have increased the scope of specification analysis and 
preparation without corresponding increase in buying personnel, resulting in further 
delays. 

Procedures have been developed and adopted, particularly with respect to 
equipment purchases that, with the cooperation of using departments, will be of 
assistance in preparing bid specifications that will be non-restrictive as far as 
possible to permit of the economical expenditure of public money and at the same 
time ensure the satisfaction of the justifiable requirements of a using department. 
Meetings have been held with personnel of various departments to arrive at a mutual 
understanding of purchasing responsibilities and methods to be used in meeting 
these responsibilities by mutual cooperation, 

6 



It is hoped that all departments rill avail themselves of the services 
and assist the Purchasing Department in developing suitable bid specifications. 

Specifications are constantly being reviewed and revised, where desirable, 
in order that the most suitable articles or services be procured for city use. 
Suggested changes in or comments regarding specifications are solicited. 

Methods of and procedures for internal checks were recently devised and 
installed which have freed supervisory personnel from the necessity of checking 
routine buying functions in detail. 

A specification and control section has been inaugurated to provide for: 

1. Systematic review of specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analysis of past purchases with a view towards establishing term 
contracts for articles and services where desirable. 

3. Related matters. 

"Tienever practical term contracts are entered into for various service 
and commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a 
department. The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting when 
individual bids are requested and elimination of the costs involved in individual 
bids. A recent addition to the list of term contracts provides for moving 
household and office equipment. It is requested that departments notify the 
Purchasing Department regarding services or articles that might be advantageously 
purchased for them on a term contract basis. 

Continued savin & s continue to accrue as a result of purchase of fresh 
fruits an! vegetables under competitive bidding. It is intended that renewal 
of contracts for fresh fruits and vegetables, all of which expire on November 30, 
1959, will provide for U.S. Department of Agriculture inspection of deliveries. 
In addition special recuire.-^ents of the various using departments not covered in 
U.S. Grading rules will be provided for within the contract. 

The extension of definite quantity contracts to cover occasional recurr- 
ing purchases during the fiscal year has been satisfactorily expanded to cover many 
items of equipment used in some quantity by the San Francisco Unified School 
District. 

During the fiscal year UU,068 purchase orders were issued in the total 
amount of '^20,632,011. Detailed analysis is shown in Table No. 1 in the appendix. 

Some major purchases during the year included: 

Transmission Towers for Cherry Valley Project v u36,l|ll|. 

Transformers 2,277,766 
Transactions of an unusual nature during the year included: 

r'iioi-ograpning of sewer interiors (to detect leaKs, faults, etc) 
Lease of fare boxes and coin assorters for .lunicipal Railway. 

7 



Rental of television sets for the San Francisco Unified School 
District (to be used in conjunction with educational program 
of station KQED). 

Rental of Digital computer for Department of Public v; orks. 

Purchase of electronic-sound installation for San Francisco Unified 
School District to be used in teaching foreign languages. 

Purchase of filing system for Health Service System that will 
permit work to be done on any file adjacent to its file position. 

The office is in process of being remodeled and rearranged to provide 
for the most advantageous placement of personnel including as far as possible, the 
placing of all buyers in one room (270) so that salesmen will not have to go to 
more than one office when calling on the Purchasing Department. The office of 
the Purchaser of Supplies, as a result of the remodeling, will be more accessible 
to callers. It is expected that the above arrangements will be well received by 
the public as well as resulting in more efficient internal operation. 

An improved organizational set-up recently developed by the Purchaser of 
Supplies and approved by the Chief Administrative Officer will, when placed in 
operation with adequate personnel, permit of better service to other city depart- 
ments ?nd should be of major significance in overcoming heretofore unavoidable 
delays • 

BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

The Bureau of Equipment and Supplies operates and maintains central ware- 
houses and storerooms in various city departments, arranges the sale of and sells 
surplus and obsolete personal property belonging to the city, exchanges ecuipaent 
between departments, maintains a perpetual inventory of all materials purchased 
for the City & County of San Francisco and makes periodic checks of such property. 

Sales Jivision 

Twenty-five sales were conducted during the fiscal year 1958-1959* Sales 
were made under the authority of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities 
included legal research into various aspects of different sales, preparation of 
sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, the opening and awarding of bids, collect- 
ing and depositing of all moneys received from the buyers with the City Treasurer 
and the keeping of all records of correspondence relative to the sales. 



The total revenue from the sales of 1958-59 was i205,87l.Ul. A general 
breakdown of the sales is as follows: 

Misc. metal scrap and salvage . * $171,213.31 

Railway salvage, motor coaches, parts, engines, 

armatures, wheels, street cars, etc 11,258.95 

Sheep 2,558. UO 

Fire Hose 6,177.35 

Used Automobiles 3,329.9l 

Dried Sewage Sludge 3,637.92 

Grease and Bones l,2l;7.1u 

Agricultural Products u, 235.06 

Miscellaneous Sales . 2, 150.10 

Miscellaneous Revenue 76. 2U 

TOTAL REVENUE FROM SALES .... v205,87U.lO. 

Sales of passenger automobiles which heretofore had been traded in on the 
purchase of new cars are included in these sales. Forty-one cars were sold, the 
results of which were quite satisfying, returning to the city more value than could 
be realized by trade-in procedure. 

Inventory Division 

The nrogram for this division includes the maintenance of a perpetual 
inventory of the city's eouipaent, moving and transfer of equipment, investigation 
and reporting of missing or stolen property and the transfer of used equipment 
between the departments. 

This division was also concerned with the rehabilitation of surplus equip- 
ment discarded by the various departments as no longer suitable for their use. In 
most cases such discarded furniture and equipment were returned to other depart- 
ments, thus obviating the necessity for additional purchases, resulting in a relief 
to the budget. During the past fiscal year the total amount of discarded furniture 
returned to active use to the city amounted to ^18,811. 

An important responsibility of this division is the automobile control 
desk. The entire work of integrating the automobile administration into a central 
control with the use of the IBM system is now complete. This provides a more prac- 
tical, comprehensive and flexible program in dealing with the acquisition, assign- 
ment, licensing, insurance and disposition of the city's entire automobile fleet, 
valued at $1,112,000. Strict liaison was effected between the Shops, Departments 
and the State Department of Motor Vehicles. 

The Inventory Division during the past year has continued to be a source of 
help to various cities and communities in providing them with information and manuals 
of procedure on request and sitting in on educational conferences dealing with the 
practical application of our manual to their needs. 

Stores Division 

Uniform and progressive procedures have been inaugurated or improved upon 
in the Storekeeping Division, including a rigid program for the inspection of mater- 
ial and supplies on receipt of same through purchase orders. It is well recognized 



now that ordering is only half of a purchase transaction. The other half, just 
as important, is to make sure the city receives the quality and quantity ordered. 
This important activity has resulted in many rejections of supplies not meeting 
the standards, weights or specifications required by the purchase orders. This 
innovation has already proved most satisfactory and the results are reflected in 
a better understanding between the city and the vendors for the public interest. 
A most comprehensive control on blanket order purchases and purchases at the 
institutions has also been effected. 

The stores division includes sixteen major stores outlets and nine sub- 
stores. Generally, storekeeping includes ordering, limited purchasing, receipt, 
inspection and storage - the issuance of all stores, preparation of reports, inven- 
tories and general control and security of the storerooms. Due to a projected 
plan for quantity purchasing that would reflect purchasing savings, the warehouse 
is being readied for the receipt and storage of quantity shipments in carload lots 
and other large quantities of such commodities that will reflect a saving by astute 
quantity buying. 

During the past fiscal year the Park General Stores warehouse's new 
building from the Bond Fund was turned over to the Purchasing Department for oper- 
ation. It is at the moment operating at about 50% efficiency due to the lack of 
sensitive facilities. At this time the storeroom is operated by one storekeeper 
and is being used for the storage of supplies and other items not previously 
inventoried as stock items and for other functions. If and when additional help 
in the form of a General Storekeeper is allowed, the storeroom operation will be 
augmented by the Recreation supplies inventory no-f at Central " : arehouse and the 
operation will encompass the entire scope of Park Stores. 

Central Warehouse has continued to progress in rendering a better service 
for all departments. This facility is the central point of distribution and also 
serves as a depot for various departments for lot shipments. The Central Ware- 
house provides a local delivery point for those city departments and agencies in 
the outlying districts and out of town thus providing buyers not only with a stor- 
age area but also effecting savings in delivery and freight charges to the city. 

General 

The Bureau of equipment and Supplies has a definite plan worked out in 
conjunction with the Disaster Corps and are ready to put same into effect immed- 
iately, if and when a catastrophe strikes. 

The Bureau has a successful safety program which has reflected its value 
in a minimum loss of time due to accidents. A representative of the storekeeping 
department is in regular attendance at the periodic local meetings of the National 
and State Safety Counsel. 

Regular staff meetings are held for the discussion of the operation of 
our Bureau and many constructive suggestions, which have had their origin in these 
meetings, have blossomed into standard procedure not only in this bureau but have 
been incorporated into departmental and city wide procedures. 

The Bureau conducted surveys, audits, educational programs and has made 
routine changes in personnel with a vie ,,T toward more efficient, economical and 
practical administration of the Division. 

10 



Much favorable publicity has been given to the city by the daily press, 
radio and TV, locally and nationally, trade and national magazines, in connection 
with our sales program. 

The stores has effected the move of the General Stores from Shop No. 1 on 
Francisco Street and Shops No. 2 and 3 at the Palace of Fine Arts to the new 
Consolidated Shops at Quint and Jerrold Streets, and a survey is under way at the 
moment to coordinate and consolidate the stores activities of these three former 
shops into one general store. v>e also effected a move of the old Park Storeroom 
to the new and more spacious warehouse at Golden Gate Park. 

BUREAU OF PERSONNEL & ACCOUNTS 

This Bureau under a Head C3e rk with 15 clerical personnel, has charge of 
budgetary and personnel functions, processes purchase orders, checks and transmits 
invoices to Controller for payment, sells Charters, codes and other documents and 
procures official bonds for officers and employees. 

During the fiscal year 33,080 "regular" purchase orders in amount of 
w 20,35U,05lt and 10,988 "petty" purchase orders amounting to 4-277,957 were processed. 
Table No. 1 in the appendix shows the work accomplished in detail. 

Sales of Charters ani codes amounted to v>6,081t and sales of other docu- 
ments amounted to v 1033. 

The feasibility and methods for reducing the number of purchase orders 
processed is being studied. 

A new position of Senior Clerk is urgently needed for additional super- 
vision, to perform other work, and to act for the Head Clerk in his absence. 

Statistics showing comparison of expenditures with budget allowances 
and comparison of revenues with estimated revenues are shown in the appendix on 
Table No. 2. 

BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Bureau of Shops at 800 Quint Street and at other locations as detailed 
below maintains and repairs all City and County automotive equipment (except that 
of Public Utility Commission departments) Fire Department pumping stations, tanks 
and standby stations, fire boat equipment, breathing apparatus, specialized equip- 
ment at prisons, county jail and Log Cabin Ranch School, pumps for county jail 
water supply, sewage pumping stations and plants, Third Street and Islais Creek 
bridges, Park locomotive and train, olay ground and zoo equipment, heaters and 
blowers, hand and power mowers and other miscellaneous equipment. About lu00 
cars, trucks, and other engine driven equipment are repaired annually. 



11 



Shop personnel consists of the following: 

1 M-8 General Superintendent 

26 J-66 Garagemen 

33 M-5U Automotive Machinists 

3 .1-55 Foremen Automotive Machinists 

2 M-57 Sub-Foreman automotive machinist 

2 M-60 Fender & Radiator men 

3 M-107 Blacksmith finishers 
3 M-108 Blacksmiths 

9 M-25U machinists 

2 A-156 Patternmakers 

3 A-36ii Car & auto painters 
1 0-1 Chauffeur 

1 0-108 Leather worker 

Operations are conducted at the Central Shops and at the following 
locations; 

Central Warehouse 

19th Avenue, Street Cleaning Yard 

Health Garage 

Department of Electricity 

Golden Gate Park Garage 

Police Garage & Motorcycle Shop 

Golden Gate Park Garage 

Army Street Yard 

Richmond-Sunset Sewage Plant 

North Point Sewage Plant 

Southeast Sewage Plant 

Police Garage 

During the year two new shops were completed - at 800 Quint Street, 
replacing Shops 1, 2 and 3 - and in Golden Gate Park. The new facilities designed 
for efficient operation replaces old, poorly designed, cramped structures. 

The move to the 800 Quint Street location during June was accomplished 
with a minimum of service interruption by careful advance planning. 

Originally budgeted funds for departments served were insufficient for 
maintenance and repair of automotive and other equipment for which this bureau is 
responsible. Some departments had to obtain supplemental appropriations or 
transfers. The work force is inadequate for the work that should be done but 
funds originally appropriated are insufficient for additional employments. The 
situation is further complicated by the fact that there is a backlog of work en 
July 1 as a result of insufficient departmental appropriations. In addition, the 
number of vehicles to be maintained for most departments is steadily increasing - 
as an example the expanding of the school driver- training program. 

A proposed organization set-up which I- s .- ' inrx-ase the t t-.l personnel. 
but does provide for much needed supervisory personnel has been developed and 
approved in principal by the Chief Administrative Officer. This reorganization, 
when put into effect, will permit adequate supervision of all areas of the bureau's 
operation and will include an assistant to the Superintendent of Shops to act in his 
absence and share his administrative duties. 

12 



Changes made in operating procedures as a result of the consolidation 
will result in more efficiency and lower costs as: 

Automobiles of all departments will be repaired separately rather than 
with trucks. This will result in mechanics becoming more efficient and 
cars will be kept cleaner. 

The hose storage and repair are separated from the storeroom. 

The sheet metal shop has been separated from the paint shop. 

The paint shop is no longer a storage area for fire apparatus, trucks 
and ladders. 

Wood working, pattern and ladder shop is in a separate section and not 
with machine shop equipment. 

Aerial trucks, which take up considerable room, are now housed and 
repaired in a section separate from the regular fire truck repair shop. 

Greasing, washing, steam cleaning, and gas station each have their own 
sections separate from the shops, and easily accessible from the ampl^i- 
driveways . 

Parking sheds have been provided for dead storage of cars and trucks 
waiting repair or ready for delivery. 

Consolidation will also effect a saving on shop equipment through th« 
elimination of duplication by using a common centrally located machine shop. Most 
of the machinery is old although not necessarily worn out. A few of the machines 
have still to be motorized, having formerly been belt driven. The best of the 
machinery has been installed, some is being replaced through the current budget, 
and other worn out or duplicate machinery will be replaced in the future or sold 
as obsolete and no longer needed. 

The old method of changing truck tires through the use of tire irons 
and sledge hammers will soon be eliminated by the new truck tire changer now on 
order. 

New lockers and 38 new steel work benches were purchased out of a supple- 
mental appropriation and proper locker and sanitary facilities were built into the 
new plant. An employees' lunch room has been provided and cigarette and soft 
drink vending machines have been installed, making it unnecessary for employees to 
leave the plant. 

Further studies are being made toward improvement of operations and 
elimination of unnecessary paper work or duplication of effort. 

Additional storeroom space is needed and will be requested in the coming 
budget. This can easily be accomplished by the addition of a 12 foot mezzanine 
around three sides of the west storeroom. 

A program of preventive maintenance would be desirable and eventually save 
considerable time and money, but due to the unusual work load and shortage of workeis 
such a program is not feasible at this time. The situation is further complicated 
in some departments by the lack of spare equipment. 

13 



At Shops 1, 2 and 3 - 6,599 jobs were completed during the year as 
against 6,226 during the fiscal year of 1957-58. 

In addition many snail jobs such as minor adjustments were done* 

Shop expenditures are given in the appendix on Table No. 3» 

TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau provides a centralized service 
available to all City and County departments in machine accounting (IBM), blue- 
printing, photography, photostating, and duplicating vrhich includes mimeograph and 
cffset printing. The Bureau has saved the City and County many thousands of 
dollars by eliminating unnecessary duplication of specialized equipment and the 
employment cf trained personnel in its operation. At the present time there are 
over fifty city departments that make regular use of the services provided. Dur- 
ing the last fiscal year the volume of work processed for city departments totaled 
$201,253.2 7. This was an increase of £12,386.02 over the previous fiscal year. 

The Bureau is administered by a Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction. 
He is assisted by a Supervisor of Tabulating, a Photographer, and an Account Clerk 
who does the accounting, requisitioning, and related paper work. 

Tabulating Section - Room 158, City Hall 

Personnel 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating 
1 Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 
7 Tabula ting Machine Operators 
6 Key Punch Operators 
Equipment 

9 Key Punch Machines 
3 Sorting Machines 
3 Collators 
1 Interpreter 

1 Summary Punch 

2 Reproducers 

3 Accounting Machines, Type lj.02 

Funds for operating expenses are provided by budget transfers and work 
orders from the using departments. 

Services to the departments are designed to meet their particular needs, 
and sometimes the needs of several departments can be served from one set of key 
punched IBM cards. For example, cards are punched daily from current purchase 
orders, and these cards are used for the preparation of the following reports: 
for the Purchaser of Supplies, a daily Register of Purchase Orders; for the Con- 
troller, a consolidated posting media for rapid posting of encumbrances; for the 
Health Department and San Francisco Unified School District, Purchase Order Registers 
of orders issued f<->r these departments . 

Ui 



The major and recurring operations of the Tabulating Section are: 
Department Function 



Municipal Court 

Civil Service Co.^nission 

Controller 



Tax Collector 
Registrar of Voters 



Department of Public 
" Health 



Purchasing Department 



Processing Traffic Citations 

Salary Survey Data - Salary Standardization 
Reports - 

Tabulation of Official Bonds 
Cancelled ""arrant Report 
Summary of Unpaid Property Taxes 
Purchase Order Encumbrance Posting Report 

License Tax Accounting for Apartaents, Hotels, 
Food Inspection, etc. 

Election Officer Payroll Reports 
Election Statistics 

Birth and Death Master Index and Statistics 

Budget Statistics 

Cost Accounting- Central Office and SF General 

Hospital 
T.B. Patient Subsidy Reports 
Emergency Hospital Statistics 

Equipment Inventory 
Central Warehouse Inventory 
Stores Stationery Control 
Records of Average Use 
Fee Tag Reports 
Purchase Order Registers 
Snop Expenditure Reports 
Contract and other Statistics 

The detail processing of traffic citations for the Municipal Court is 
given to illustrate the ramifications of tabulating procedure. In the past fiscal 
year 75l>l5° traffic citations vrere issued by the Police Department and •written on 
tabulating cards. The cards are received in the bureau daily and are key-punched, 
checked and sorted for the traffic fines bureau. Paid citations are IBM processed 
to prepare daily cash calendars. Unpaid citations are machine processed to pre- 
pare notices that are mailed to offenders, and later, remaining unpaid citations 
are further processed to prepare Warrants of Arrest which are subsequently signed 
by the Judge and turned over to the Police Department for service. Throughout 
the entire process the original citation is used for the preparation of various 
documents, calendars, etc. The final operation in the case of moving violations 
is the preparation of an Abstract of Adjudication for the State of California. 

In 1961 the Tabulating Section will expand its operation to include a 
central tabulating unit in the new Hall of Justice. As a result, the unit remain- 
ing in the City Hall will have machine time available for nev- tabulating applica- 
tions. In order to be prepared to put this time to productive use consideration 
is being given to expand Department of Public Health tabulating programs and for 
others. 



Reproduction Section 

The Reproduction Section occupies two locations in the City Hall. 
Photography, photostating, microfilming, and duplicating (mimeograph and offset) 
are located in Room 50 in the basement. Blueprinting, which includes white prints 
(dry process), blue lines, Van Dykes, etc., is located on the fifth floor. 

Personnel 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction 
1 Photographer 

1 Photostat Operator 
3 Blueprint Operators 

2 Duplicating Machine Operators 
1 Account Clerk 

In addition, 1 part-time Photographer and 1 part-time Photostat 
Operator is employed. 

Equipment 

1 Blueprint Machine 

2 Ammonia Process Machines (dry process) 

1 Photostat Machine 

2 Microfilm Cameras 

2 Mimeograph Machines 

1 Offset Duplicating Machine 

Cameras 

Enlargers 

Printers, etc. 

Funds for operating expenses are provided by budget transfers and work 
orders issued by the departments who use these services. 

The major and continuing operations of the Reproduction Section are: 

Department Function 

Public Vorks Blueprinting 

Printing Blue Line Block Books 
Bureau of Architecture Specifications Preparation (Includes Fire 

houses, Schools, Public Buildings & 
Recreational Facilities) 
Photography 

Recreation and Park Blueprinting 

Specifications Preparation 
Real Estate Blueprinting Blue Line Block Books 

Tax Collector Blueprinting Blue Line Block Books 

Assessor Blueprinting Blue Line Block Books 

Recorder Blueprinting Blue Line Block Books 

Daily Microfilming and Printing of Property 
Transfers 

All Printing Prellninary Annual Budget 

16 



Department - Continued Function 

City Attorney Photography 

Treasurer Daily microf il~ing checks 

Board of Supervisors Preparation of calendars 

City Attorney Duplicating opinions and legal papers 

Civil Service Corliss ion Duplicating Salary Survey data reports 

All Duplicating Annual Reports 

These recurring activities of the Bureau are in addition to the mass of 
routine reproduction work that is done for all of the departments in the City Hall, 
and Retirement, Real Estate, City Planning, Redevelopment, Adult Probation, and 
District Attorney. Routine reproduction work includes engineering check printsj 
maps, charts, and reports for surveys for planning and redevelopment programs; 
and mimeograph, offset duplicating, and c opy work required in departmental opera- 
tions • 

During the 1958-59 fiscal year plans to relocate the blueprinting 
operations in space adjoining Room 50 were formulated, and as a result, consol- 
idation of all reproduction activities is projected. This would materially 
increase the efficiency of operation and would eliminate the necessity of climbing 
stairs to deliver and pick up work, make deliveries of supplies, etc. A fore- 
going paragraph mentioned that several pieces of equipment should be replaced 
within the next four or five years. If blueprinting operations are relocated a 
new blueprint machine should be included in the planning, because due to age and 
conditions the present machine cannot be reasonably moved without excessive cost. 



17 



APPENDIX 



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TABLE NO. 1 

Showing 

Purchase Order Processing 



1958-59 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



1957-58 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



General 


16,582 


$ 6,206,650 


16,575 


& 6,615, 9U6 


Education 


5,612 


2,71*0,630 


5,760 


2,673,705 


Health 


ii,682 


2,083,U63 


U,620 


1,996,581* 


Utilities 


6,20ii 


9,323,311 


6,099 


9,969,790 


Petty Purchase 
Orders (Not 
exceeding $50) 

10,988 


277,957 


11,690 


306,555 


Total 


111;, 068 


$20,632,011 


hk,7hk 


$21,592,580 



TABLE NO. 2 

Showing 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
appropriations except Personal Services for 1958-1959: 

Account Budgeted Expended Surplus Deficit 

Contractual Services £20,300 $22,271 $1,971 

8.311.200.000 

Materials & Supplies 10,150 12,231 2,081 

8.311.300.000 
Equipment 2,561 2,325 $236 

8.311 .1*00.311 
Premium on Official Bonds 7,500 7,978 1*78 

8.311.812.311 
Premium on Auto Insurance 18, 500 18,500 

8.311.813.311 
Membership Dues 760 755 5 

8.311.85U.311 

Total $59,771 £61^,060 $2hl &1*,530 



REVENUES 
Comparison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues in 1958-59 Budget* 



Over Under 

& 33 
6,569 





Estimated 


Actual 


Account 


Revenue 


Revenue 


7061 Sale of Documents 


v 1,000 


1,033 


7062 Minor Sales 


U,000 


10,569 


7063 Damages 


500 


15 


706U Miscellaneous Sales 




517 


7U51 Sale of Sludge 


U,000 


3,967 


7621 Sale of Grease & Bones 


1,100 


1,367 



U85 



33 



517 



267 
Total £10,600 1.17,1*68 £518 £7,386 





TABLE HO. 3 








Showing 






Shop Expenditures 




Object 


Appropriation 


Shop No. 


Amount 


Administrative 


8.312.110 


1-2-3 


$ 15,771.00 


Wages 








Wages 


8.312.130 


1-3 


25U, 278.21 


Wages 


8.312.130 


2 


168,29U.52 


Contract 


8.312.200 


1-3 


51,221.33 


Contract 


8.312.200 


2 


13,61*6.92 


Material 


8.312.300 


1-3 


101,938.08 


Material 


8.312.300 


2 


50,057.55 


Retirement 


8.312.800 


1-3 


2,963.00 


Retirement 


8.312.800 


2 


5,819.73 


Work Orders 
Work Orders 




1 
2 


32,190.75 
8,886.U2 




Shops 1 & 3 
Shop 2 


Total fcU58,362.37 
^2li6,705.lU 






Combined Shops 


i 






8.312.110.000 
8.312.130.000 
8.312.200.000 
8. 312. 300.000 
8.312.800.000 
Work Orders 


$ 15,771.30 

1*22,572.73 

6U, 868.2$ 

151,995.63 

8,782.73 

la, 077.17 

Total ^705,067.51 





Shops No. 1 & 3 
8.312.200.001 
Original Appropriation 
By transfer 

8.312.300.001 
Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 
By Work Orders 

Shop No. 2 
8. 312. 200.002 
Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 

8.312.300.002 
Original Appropriation 
By Transfer 

Transfer Out 

Combined Shops 
8.312.200.000 

8.312.300.000 



TABLE NO. 3 - Continued 
Showing 
Shop Expenditures 

Contractual Services 

$15,865.00 

3,156.00 

$1*9,021.00 

Material & Supplies 

$77,173.00 

20,29l*.88 

U,l; 70.20 
$101,938.08 

Contractual Services 

$13,051*. 00 

800.00 
$13, 851*. 00 

Material & Supplies 
$5U,726.00 

i,i5o.oo 
55,876.00 

U,92O.O0 
$50,956.00 

Appropriated 
$62,875.00 

152,89U.00 
$215,769.00 



Expenditures 



$51,221.33 



$101,938.08 



$13,61*6.92 



$50,057.55 
Expended 
$61*, 868. 25 

151,995.63 
$216,863.88 



H-loO 



DOCUMENTS 
AUG 19 1966 

SAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC UIBRAIW. 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



iNNUAL REPORT 



September, i960 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 



September 8, i960 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1959-60 

Mr. Sherman P. Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Duckel: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, i960 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department issued *+4,063 pur- 
chase orders, totalling ■17,60k t 673 t maintained 26 storerooms, 
sold $110, 275.5** surplus city property in 16 sales, did 728^ shop 
Jobs and expended $212, 619.83 on reproduction and tabulating. 
Purchasing was conducted for all city departments, shop operations 
for 5^ departments and reproduction and tabulating for 55 depart- 
ments. . •. 

The new Central Shops at 800 Quint Street in the first year of 
operation showed increased work accomplished at lower relative 
unit costs than at the previous separate locations. Generally 
equipment was maintained in better condition, downtime was mini- 
mized and backlogs reduced. 

The shortage of storekeeping personnel at particular locations 
adversely affects the proper receiving, safeguarding accounts and 
distribution of materials and supplies. 

The following statements on the activities of the Department for 
the past fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor 
to all departments, dated August 15, i960. 

1. There are no capital programs on Purchasing 
Department facilities. 

2, Recommendations on the activities of the Depart- 
ment, as stated in the Annual Report include: 

(a) Establish specification and control system 
for buying on a full time basis. 



-2- 

Mr. Sherman P. Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer September 8, I960 



(b) Add storekeeping personnel and move senior 
storekeeper to central office for better 
control. 

(c) Establish definite policies on equipment 
replacement, 

(d) Change classifications of some office per- 
sonnel for better supervision and control. 

(e) Expand services of Tabulating Division to 
serve other city departments. 

(f) Expand the Purchasing Departments space on 
'the 2nd floor of the City Hall, 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations 
other than those for personal services with original bud- 
get appropriations for 1959-1960 is given in the appendix, 
Annual Report. Funds for departments activities are ob- 
tained mainly by transfers from budget appropriations of 
other departments. 

4. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the 
budget of 1959-60 is given in the appendix, Annual Report. 

5. The budget appropriations of other departments for auto- 
motive and other equipment services, and for tabulating 
and reproduction, should be increased yearly to compen- 
sate for the increase in work required, and for steadily 
increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the 
Annual Report. 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank you for your assistance 
and guidance given me and to Mr. T. F. Conway, other bureau heads, 
and to the employees of the Purchasing Department for their co- 
operation and loyalty without which the Department could not 
function as efficiently and as effectively. 

Very truly yours, 

-"Sen benas 

Purchaser of Supplies 



September, i960 
ANNUAL REPORT 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Department, under the Chief Administrative Officer in 
accordance with Charter provisions, purchases materials and supplies, 
equipment and contractual services for all departments for the City 
and County, including city-owned utilities, and the San Francisco 
Unified School District; repairs and maintains automotive and other 
equipment for the various departments except Public Utilities and 
for the School District as requested; operates a central tabulating 
and reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; 
transfers to other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies 
no longer useful to any department of the city; maintains a perpetual 
inventory of equipment in the various departments; and operates cen- 
tral stores of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments 
by the Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau 
of Buying on new products, specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 201 in five bureaus, the same as in 
1958-59. The organization of the Department is shown on the Organi- 
zation Chart in the appendix. 

Supervisory - June 30. I960 

Administrative 

B. Benas - Purchaser of Supplies 
H. Shiman - Secretary 



Bureaus 



Buying 

T. F. Conway - Chief Assistant Purchaser - Bureau Head & 

Asst. Dept. Head 
J. C. Gavin - Senior Assistant Purchaser 
A. K. Arnold - Head Clerk 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. E. Leary - Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies - 

Bureau Head 
H, R. Stevens - Senior Storekeeper 



Bureaus - Continued 

Personnel and Accounts 

J, Brackett - Head Clerk - Bureau Head 
Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - Superintendent of Shops - Bureau Head 
J. Fischer - Foreman Auto Machinist 

R, Johnstone - Foreman .^uto Machinist 

B. Shain - Foreman Auto Machinist 

Tabulating and Re-production 

G. A. Stanley - Supervisor of Reproduction - Bureau Head 
J. W. Bender - Supervisor of Tabulating 

The valued services of the following were separated from 
city employment through retirement or death after years of meri- 
torious accomplishment: 

Appr ox. Years 
Name Position City Service Date 

RETIRED 

A. W. Petan General Superintendent 

of Shops 31 10-1-59 

H. G. Hicklin Storekeeper 15i 1-1-60 

W. W. Lewis Senior Assistant Purchaser 

of Supplies 24£ 4-1-60 

DIED 

G. O'Brien General Clerk Typist 9 8-18-59 

G. C. Densmore Garageman 4^ 8-20-59 

J. K. Munson General Clerk Typist 8-1/3 12-14-59 

W. P. Flinn Storekeeper 17-1/3 3-5-60 

Mr, A. W. Petan retired as Superintendent of Shops on 
October 1, 1959 after 31 years of city service. He is largely res- 
ponsible for the efficiency and effectiveness of the Purchaser's 
Shop operations and had a major part in the development of the new 
Central Shops. 

Mr. W. W. Lewis retired as Senior Assistant Purchaser of 
Supplies on April 1, i960 after 2kh years of city service. In this 
capacity he was responsible for overseeing buying and coordinating 
with other departments. The present efficient operation is largely 
due to his conscientious efforts. 



Work Accomplished 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more 
detail under the separate bureaus, remained substantially the same 
as in 1958-1959» except for reduced purchases for public utilities. 
Major accomplishments are indicated In the following table: 

Bureau 

Buying 



Equipment and Supplies 



Shops 



Tabulating and 
Reproduction 



Unit 


1958-1959 


1959-1960 


Purchase Orders 


44,068 


44,063 


Amount 


;20, 632,000 


017,604,673 


Sales Number 

Sales Amount 

Major Stores 

Operated 


25 

5205,870 

16 


16 
$110,276 

15 


Job Orders 
Expenditures 


6,559 
§705,06? 


7,284 
£809,182 


Expenditures- 
Tabulating 

Expenditures- 
Reproduction 


0104,180 
597,070 


Cl04,721 
$107,899 


General Comments 







Further improvements in standard routine and purchasing 
procedures and practices continued. A specification and control 
section formed for studies which cannot be done by buyers without 
impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis because of 
lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full 
time is clearly apparent, in view of rapid technological advances 
in processes, equipment, and materials and supplies. 

There is critical need for 2 General Storekeepers and 5 
Storekeepers to meet the Purchaser's responsibilities for adequate 
control of supplies and equipment for the various departments at the 
new Park Central Stores, Hetch Hetchy stores, Laguna Honda Home, 
County Jail, Consolidated Shops, and for vacation relief and inven- 
tory. The Bureau was reorganized to provide more direct assistance 
to the Bureau Head, and more direct supervision of storekeeping. 

The first year operation of the new Central Shops at 
800 Quint Street should increase work accomplished at lower relative 
unit costs than at separate locations. Some obsolete equipment was 
replaced, and other units are scheduled for replacement as funds are 
made available. The consolidation of operations by functions has 
resulted in the most efficient use of equipment and personnel. The 



Shops reconverted Fire Department obsolete motorized equipment to 
modern needed units at material savings. 

No changes in number or classification of personnel for 
Tabulating or Reproduction Bureau are Indicated except one blueprint 
operator should be reclassified to a sub-foreman operator to provide 
supervision in the blueprint room on the fifth floor of the City 
Hall. The blueprinting facilities should be relocated to the base- 
ment of the City Hall to provide easy access and better control. 

The need for reorganizing accounting and clerical functions 
is apparent. Changes in classification of supervisory personnel 
have been recommended in the recent Civil Service classification sur- 
vey. Any action on reorganization will be delayed pending that taken 
on the survey recommendations. 

The Purchasing and Civil Service Departments Jointly worked 
on an experimental program for employee evaluations. Under this pro- 
gram employees were questioned on their appraisal of their Job, their 
supervisors and city work in general. This questionnaire indicated 
that although employees were generally satisfied improvement is in- 
dicated in communication and supervision. The supervising employees 
of the department attended a course for employee development. It is 
expected that the knowledge garnered will be of material value in 
improving morale and work. 

A committee composed of Mr, R. Brooks Larter, Assistant 
Director, Administrative, Department of Public Works, Mr. Joseph 
Mignola, Executive Assistant, Chief Administrative Officer and the 
Purchaser of Supplies, commenced and are continuously engaged in a 
study on the application of election data processing (EDP) to depart- 
ments under the Chief Administrative Officer. 

The need for additional office space at the City Hall is 
critical. This matter will be considered when the Bureau of Building 
Inspection, Department of Public Works moves to k^O McAllister Street, 
scheduled for 1961. 

STUDIES ^ND IMPROVEMENTS 

As stated under the separate bureaus studies for improve- 
ment and simplification of operations continued: 

The number of purchase orders for specific cases 
was reduced, however, further study will be given 
to the large percentage, approximately 25, for 
purchases to $25.00 amounts to about 1% in dollar 
value. 

Improving storekeeping techniques resulted in better oper- 
ation and control. The studies on application of coding and electronic 
data processing will continue. 



Use of time saving office equipment, envelope openers and 
letter folders, has improved and speeded up office operations. 

Studies on use of modern shop equipment and techniques 
resulted in improved shop operations. 

Every effort was made to acquaint departments with the 
facilities of the Bureau of Reproduction and Tabulating. 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

Planning and programming of Purchasing Department Civil 
Defense activities are under Mr. Claude P. Webster, Department Civil 
Defense Co-ordinator. The following is the report of the Civil De- 
fense activities of the Purchasing Department in the fiscal year: 

(a) A new supply plan was developed in accordance 
with the revised State Plan Supply Annex (17-OP). 
This plan after many conferences received ap- 
proval of local and State civil defense authori- 
ties. Copies were distributed to local Civil 
Defense agencies including the Petroleum Ad- 
visory Sub-Committee and the San Francisco 
Agricultural Commissioner and to key Purchas- 
ing Department employees. 

(b) Purchasing Department employees have been 
kept current on latest disaster instructions. 

(c) Plans have been formulated for operation at 
two locations should a disaster occur. 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, 
insurance, contracts for services, for all city departments and the 
San Francisco Unified School District, Except for term contracts 
based on estimated quantities, all buying starts with receipt of 
requisition from the using department. Included in or incidental 
to the procurement function are the following: 

I. Buying - Bids and Award s 

A. Preparation of bids: 

1. Technical specifications 

2. Contractual conditions 

B. Advertising and mailing bids 

C. Opening and tabulating bids 

D. Review and award of bids 

1. Determination of suitability of alternate offers 

a. Review of specifications and information 
furnished by bidder 

b. Laboratory and operating tests 

c. Investigation of use by others 

d. Other investigations and analysis 

2. Determination of bid compliance with legal and 
contractual requirements, 

E. Preparation of contracts 
II, Buying - Related Functions 

A, Specifications and control 

1, Analysis of records of average use 

2, Specifications 

a. Development and revision 

b, Maintenance of specification file 
3» Inception of new term contracts 

a. Determination of desirability 

b. Preparation of technical specifications and 
contractual conditions 

4, Review of: 

a. Policies 

b. Methods 

c. Forms 



PERSONNEL: 

The Buying Division is headed by the Chief Assistant Pur- 
chaser and includes 10 assistant purchasers and a clerical staff of 
11 engaged in typing, mailing, opening and tabulating bids, main- 
taining bid index and specifications file and typing contracts. Funds 
for some of these employments, both buying and clerical, are pro- 
vided by other departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

1 - Chief Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

1 - Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

7 - Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 

1 - Printing and Stationery Buyer 

1 - assistant Stationery Buyer 

1 - Head Clerk 

1 - Clerk Stenographer 

7 - Clerk Typist 

1 - Typist I 

1 - General Clerk 

OPERATIONS : 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with al- 
lowance for items of a special nature or in cases v/here seasonal 
peaks or vacation period make it advisable to temporarily deviate 
from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange 
of ideas, explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the 
assistant purchasers informed as to the over-all progress and prob- 
lems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as 
possible but delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate in- 
formation furnished with requisitions, and failure of departments to 
submit requisitions promptly for equipment items that are to be 
grouped for purchase for purposes of standardization and economy. 

ns previously stated all purchasing done in this office 
with the exception of term contracts based on estimated quantities 
starts with the receipt of a Requisition for Purchase Order from the 
using department. The suitability of the article or service pur- 
chased is directly related to the completeness and accuracy of the 
information contained in the requisition. 

Upon receipt in the Purchasing Department the requisition 
is assigned to an Assistant Purchaser who is responsible for first 
determining as far as practical if the information furnished is suf- 
ficient to ensure that the article or service to be purchased will 
be suitable for its intended use. 



OPERATIONS - Continued 

In requisitions for equipment, materials and supplies the 
degree and extent of such information is contingent upon the nature 
of the article to be purchased. The following examples of check 
factors which apply to equipment items specifically but which are 
to some extent applicable to many other articles are particularly 
important when bids are required: 

1. Is reference made, by manufacturer's or brand name 
and model number, to an acceptable item to be used 
as a quality standard? 

2. If physical specifications are included: 

a. Is the need for restrictive details readily 
apparent or have they been fully explained? 

b. Are unnecessary specification details included? 

c. If dimensions or capacities are given, have 
reasonable tolerances been indicated or is the 
need for specific dimensions or capacities readily 
apparent or fully explained? 

3. Are performance requirements clearly set forth? 

If requisitions are for services for which bids will be 
required the information desired varies somewhat from that necessary 
for tangible articles but the basic concept is the same - are re- 
quirements fully and completely expressed with no restrictive factors 
included unless the reasons for such is readily apparent or fully 
explained. 

The Purchasing Department requests the cooperation of other 
departments in preparing requisitions that will comply with the com- 
petitive purchase requirements of the Charter and Administrative 
Code, permit the most economical expenditure of public money and 
provide the most suitable articles or services for City and School 
District use. Departments are invited to discuss preparation of 
requisitions (as well as other purchasing methods) with the Purchas- 
ing Department. 

Specifications are constantly being reviewed and revised, 
where desirable, in order that the most suitable articles or services 
be procured for city use. Suggested changes in or comments regarding 
specifications are solicited. 

A committee has been established of Purchasing and Health 
Department representatives to evaluate requirements, to review exist- 
ing specifications and to standardize for use by all institutions 
where possible. It is expected that material savings, more flexi- 
bility in use and procurement of more suitable items will result. 



The method for internal checks established in 1958-59 were 
continued. These have freed supervisory personnel from the neces- 
sity of checking routine buying functions in detail. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1, Review of specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing 
additional term contracts for articles and services 
where desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above ser- 
vices is apparent if the department is to most efficiently and ef- 
fectively perform its purchasing functions. This work is now being 
done on an intermittent basis as time is available. Every effort 
should be made to procure a full time employment, preferably a Senior 
Assistant Purchaser for this work. 

Whenever practical term contracts are entered into for 
various service and commodities in general use by several depart- 
ments or recurring use by a department. The main advantages are 
elimination of the time lag resulting when individual bids are re- 
quested and elimination of the costs involved in individual bids, 
A recent addition to the list of term contracts provides for moving 
household and office equipment. It is requested that departments 
notify the Purchasing Department regarding services or articles that 
might be advantageously purchased for them on a term contract basis. 

Purchase of fresh fruits and vegetables on a competitive 
basis continues to be satisfactory. Changes in bid methods and re- 
vised specifications suggested by the Chef at the Laguna Honda Home, 
have resulted in better quality control of commodities purchased and 
simplified contract administration by the various using departments. 
Monthly quotations are received on specific items with provision for 
U. S, Department of Agriculture inspection on all deliveries. 

The extension of definite quantity contracts to cover oc- 
casional recurring purchases during the fiscal year has been satis- 
factorily expanded to cover many items of equipment used in some 
quantity by the San Francisco Unified School District, 

During the fiscal year 44,063 purchase orders were issued 
in the total amount of §17,] 604,673. Detailed analysis is shown in 
Table No, 1 in the Appendix, 

GENERAL ; 

STUDIES & IMPROVEMENTS : 

Insurance procurement is now governed by an ordinance en- 
acted in December 1959 and incorporated in the San Francisco Adminis- 
trative Code, This ordinance formalizes procedures which have been 



followed in principle in the past and reads as follows: 

ORDINANCE NO. 664- 59 

Amending Chapter 21 of the San Francisco Administrative 
Code by adding Section 21.2-1 Thereto Relating to Pur- 
chase of Insurance. 

Be it ordained by the People of the City and County 
of San Francisco: 

Section 1, Chapter 21 of the San Francisco Adminis- 
trative Code is hereby amended by adding Section 21.2-1 
thereto, relating to purchase of insurance, to read as 
follows: 

Section 21.2-1 Purchase of insurance . The Purchaser 
of Supplies shall base his award of an order for insurance 
to a broker, agent or company on at least three (3) quo- 
tations. He shall keep a record of such quotations and 
a register of all awards made thereunder. In the event 
that it is not possible to obtain three (3) quotations, 
he shall base his award on the quotation or quotations 
received. Said award may be made on the basis of price 
or service or both. Whenever it is customary to write 
insurance for one (1) year only, new quotations shall 
be solicited at least every three (3) years. Whenever 
it is customary to write insurance in excess of one 
year, new quotations shall be solicited at least on 
each expiration date. Whenever it is customary to 
write insurance that is continuous in form, new quo- 
tations shall be solicited at least every five (5) 
years. 

The Purchaser of Supplies may, with approval of 
the Controller, add expiring to existing coverages. 

This ordinance shall not apply to insurance command- 
ing a premium of $1,000 or less. 

I hereby certify that the foregoing ordinance was 
passed for second reading by the Board of Supervisors 
of the City and County of San Francisco at its meeting 
of Dec. 21, 1959. 

Robert J. Dolan, Clerk. 

Passed by the Board of Supervisors of the City and 
County of San Francisco at its meeting of Dec. 28, 1959. 

Robert J. Dolan, Clerk. 
Approved Dec. 30, 1959. 

George Christopher, Mayor. 
Jan. 5, i960 



10 



The first major transaction under authority of this ordi- 
nance was procurement of Airport Liability Insurance for a three 
year period commencing April 1, i960. A substantial increase over 
the previous premium was determined to be due to the increase In 
use of Jet planes with corresponding increase in individual plane 
value and increased passengers per plane. This increase was re- 
flected in higher insurance premiums paid by other major airports. 

Furniture specifications for the new Hall of Justice were 
developed with the cooperation of the Department of Public Works 
and other departments who will occupy this building. Furniture was 
standardized as far as practical. 

The term contract for television maintenance was based on 
a discount from established local rates for specific service rather 
than a time and material basis making closer control of expenditures 
possible. 

Bids for class A automobiles in the I96O-I96I budget were 
opened prior to July 1 to permit purchase of i960 models before 
production lines were shut down. It is expected that earlier re- 
placement of older vehicles will provide savings in maintenance 
costs. 

Provision was made for dual awards on annual contracts for 
typewriters and other office machines making it possible to satisfy 
specific requirements of using departments and also provide for 
competition. 

STUDIES & IMPROVEMENTS : 

During the I96O-I96I fiscal year it is proposed to: 

1. Review the existing "Procurement Procedure" 

to determine if revisions are desirable and con- 
currently to develop an office buying manual in- 
corporating therein such instructions as have 
been previously issued to provide uniformity 
in buying policies and procedures. 

2. Analyze the internal work flow and the related 
forms and procedures so that the work of the 
department may be simplified and expedited as 
far as feasible. 

3. Confer with Controller regarding the feasibility 
of facilitating the work flow of papers requiring 
Joint action. 

4. Seek methods for providing adequate inspection 
and check of articles received when technical 
knowledge is required beyond that of receiving 
or purchasing department personnel. 



11 



The above is to be accomplished as far as possible with 
existing personnel. Complete fulfillment of these alms and other 
advisable studies and improvements is contingent upon the establish- 
ment of a new position of Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies to 
head and form the nucleus of a Specifications and Control section. 



BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

The Bureau of Equipment and Supplies operates and maintains 
central warehouse and storerooms in various city departments, re- 
ceives and issues materials, supplies and equipment for all depart- 
ments of the City and County of San Francisco and makes miscellaneous 
emergency purchases for the account of the various agencies. This 
Bureau arranges the sale of and sells surplus and obsolete personal 
property belonging to the City, exchanges equipment between depart- 
ments, maintains a perpetual inventory of all materials purchased 
for the City and County of San Francisco and makes periodic checks 
of such property. The Bureau maintains control of the entire auto- 
motive fleet, including the listing, insurance and the reporting of 
all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the 
Division of Sales, Inventory and Stores: 



Main Office 

Central Warehouse 

Yard 

Sub-Stores 
Central Shops - Central Stores 
Water Dept. - Central Stores 
Public Works - Central Stores 
Hetch Hetchy - Central Stores 
Health Dept. - Central Stores 



Public Welfare - Central Stores 
S.F. Int'l. Airport - Central Stores 
Rec.-Park - Central Stores 
Dept. of Electricity - Central Stores 



Central Warehouse, 15th & 

Harrison Sts. 
15th & Harrison Sts. 
18^9 Harrison St. 
Room 5, City Hall 
800 Quint St. 
639 Bryant St. 
2323 Army St. 
Moccasin, Calif. 
S.F. Gen. Hospital, 22nd & 

Potrero Sts. 
Laguna Honda Home, 7th «ve. & 

Dewey Blvd. 
Kassler Health Home, Redwood 

City 
Single Hen's Rehabilitation 

Center, Redwood City 
S.F. Int'l. Airport, South 

San Francisco 
Golden Gate Park Yard, 3rd Ave. 

& So. Drive 
26h Golden Gate Ave. 



12 



Municipal Railway - Central Stores 



General Stores 
Central Stores 
Transfer Room 
Storage Yard 
Sheriff's Department, General Stores 

PERSONNEL; 



24th & Utah Sts. 
Hampshire and Mariposa Sts. 
Geary and Presidio Sts. 
Kirkland Yard 
575 Ocean nvenue 
Geneva and San Jose Ave, 
Hampshire and Mariposa Sts. 
Elkton Station, Ocean Ave. 
County Jails, San Francisco 
San Mateo Counties 



The Sales - Inventory - Stores Division is staffed by the 
following permanent Civil Service personnel: 

1 - Supervisor of Equipment & Supplies 
1 - Senior Storekeeper 
1 - account Clerk 

1 - General Clerk- Stenographer 

2 - General Clerk-Typists 
1 - General Clerk 

9 - General Storekeepers 
29 - Storekeepers 
1 - Laborer 

46 - Total Employments 

SALES DIVISION : 

Sixteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year 1959- 
1960. Sales were made under the authority of Section 88 of the Char- 
ter. Sales activities included legal research into various aspects 
of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting Interested buyers 
to bid, the opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing 
of all moneys received from the buyers with the City Treasurer and 
keeping of all records of correspondence relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of 1959-1960 was 
■3110,275.54. A general breakdown of the sales is as follows: 



Misc. Metal Scrap and Salvage 
Trolley Coaches , * , . . 
Used nutomobiles • , • , 
Used Trucks ....... 

Rly. Salvage Parts & Budd Wheels 
Sand and Pipeline .... 

Traffic Signals and Tires 
Rifles and Salvage ... 
Grease and Bones . * . . 
Dried Sewage Sludge ... 
agricultural Products • . 
Misc. Sales and Revenue . 

TOTAL REVENUE PROM SALES 



£42,543.82 

30,370.27 

12,313.16 

7,592.33 

4,062.12 

2,362.00 

979.78 

538.07 

1,210.29 

4,088.56 

2,623.91 

1,491.2? 



§110,275.54 



13 



The Bureau inaugurated a new selling procedure during the 
past year for the sales of used automobiles. In place of sealed 
bids, the new procedure provides for a "Spot Bid Sale" by which we 
were able to realize more revenue per car, speed up the sale of auto- 
mobiles and expedite the entire transaction in far less time than 
the previous type of sale. This new method was well received by 
the trade buyers and also a source of satisfaction to our own de- 
partment. Sixty-five passenger automobiles, twenty-four trucks and 
one hundred and thirty- six buses were sold during the year, 

INVENTORY DIVISION ; 

The program for this division includes the maintenance of 
a perpetual inventory of the City's equipment, moving and transfer 
of equipment, investigation and reporting of missing or stolen 
property and the transfer of used equipment between the departments. 

This division was also concerned with the rehabilitation of 
surplus equipment discarded by the various departments as no longer 
suitable for their use. In most cases such discarded furniture and 
equipment were returned to other departments, thus obviating the 
necessity for additional purchases, resulting in a relief to the 
budget. During the past fiscal year the total amount of discarded 
furniture returned to active use to the City amounted to 01^,120.00. 

An important responsibility of this division is the auto- 
mobile control desk. The integration of the automobile administra- 
tion into a central control with the use of the IBM system has been 
completed. This provides a practical, comprehensive and flexible 
program in dealing with the acquisition, assignment, licensing, in- 
surance and disposition of the City's entire automobile fleet, valued 
at vl, 112, 000. 00. Strict liaison was effected between the Shops, 
Departments and the State Department of Motor Vehicles. 

The Inventory Division during the past year has continued 
to be a source of help to various cities and communities in providing 
them with information and manuals of procedure on request and sitting 
in on educational conferences dealing with the practical application 
of our manual to their needs. 

STORES DIVISION : 

Uniform and progressive procedures have been inaugurated or 
improved upon in the Storekeeping Division, including a rigid program 
for the inspection of material and supplies on receipt of same through 
purchase orders. It is well recognized now that ordering is only 
half of a purchase transaction. The other half, just as important, 
is to make sure the City receives the quality and quantity ordered. 
This important activity has resulted in many rejections of supplies 
not meeting the standards, weights or specifications required by the 



14 



purchase orders. The Bureau has made full use of the Central Ware- 
house's laboratory in the field of inspection of materials, supplies 
and equipment in the interest of "caveat emptor". This innovation 
has already proved most satisfactory and the results are reflected 
in a better understanding between the City and the vendors for the 
public interest. A more comprehensive control on blanket order pur- 
chases and purchases at the institutions has also been effected. 

The stores division includes sixteen major stores outlets 
and nine sub-stores. Generally, storekeeping includes ordering, 
limited purchasing, receipt, inspection and storage - the issuance 
of all stores, preparation of reports, inventories and general con- 
trol and security of the storerooms. Due to a projected plan for 
quantity purchasing that would reflect purchasing savings, the ware- 
house is being readied for the receipt and storage of quantity ship- 
ments in carload lots and other large quantities of such commodities 
that will reflect a saving by astute quantity buying. 

During the past year the Department of Public Works' Store- 
room, 2323 Army Street, was reorganized and stores accounting pro- 
cedures revised. 

The procedures for the storeroom at the Central Shops are 
being changed as recommended by the John Forbes and Company survey. 
Under these procedures the San Francisco Fire Department's Janitorial 
supplies were moved to Central Warehouse for more centralized control. 

The Hassler Health Home and Public Welfare's storerooms at 
Redwood City were reorganized. 

Central Warehouse has continued to progress in rendering 
a better service for all departments. This facility is the central 
point of distribution and also serves as a depot for various depart- 
ments for lot shipments. The Central Warehouse provides a local 
delivery point for those city departments and agencies in the out- 
lying districts and out of town thus providing buyers not only with 
a storage area but also effecting savings in delivery and freight 
charges to the city. 

GENERAL : 

More personnel are needed in storerooms to provide efficient 
operation. 

A, At Hetch Hetchy there - is a possibility of a new* 

. employment: of a general storekeeper which will relieve 
the tension" and provide an equitable work load at 
that very important facility. 

B. At the Park-Recreation storeroom the same conditions 
prevail as was reported last year of having only one 
storekeeper to perform work which would normally be 
done by a General Storekeeper and a Storekeeper. 

15 



C. Vacations and sick leave without replacement hamper 
efficiency in rendering adequate service to depart- 
ments as well as placing an extra burden upon our 
already under- staffed personnel. 

D. In the Sheriff's Department consideration should 
be given the work of storekeeping now being per- 
formed by two high-priced Jailors whereas one 
storekeeper with the General Storekeeper now in 
that department could perform both jobs. 

The Senior Storekeeper now assigned to the Municipal Railway 
who is in effect the Chief Assistant of the Bureau should be moved 
to Central Warehouse as his services would be more advantageous to 
the Department on a full time rather than intermittent basis. This 
would entail a new employment of a General Storekeeper at the rail- 
way. The Jacobs survey has recommended such a change. 

The Bureau's Central Office was moved during the year from 
the City Hall to more spacious quarters in Central Warehouse. This 
provided the Bureau with a more central and a more convenient head- 
quarters for administrative action. 

The Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies and his staff of 
General Storekeepers have completed an In-Service Pilot Training 
Program conducted by the Civil Service Commission and the San Fran- 
cisco Unified School District. This schooling provided a worthwhile 
medium and greatly added to our skills in evaluating, training and 
handling employees. The Bureau also had its own in- training program 
within the department. 

The Bureau has a definite plan worked out in conjunction 
with the Disaster Corps ready to put into effect immediately, if 
and vihen a catastrophe strikes. 

The Bureau conducted surveys, audits, educational programs 
and has made routine changes in personnel with a view toward more 
efficient, economical and practical administration. 

During the fiscal year the intensive Safety Program in the 
Stores Division resulted in a perfect record — not one working 
hour was lost due to accidents. 

Regular staff meetings are held for the discussion of the 
operation of the Bureau and many constructive suggestions, which 
have had their origin in these meetings, have been made standard 
procedure in this bureau and City wide. 

This Bureau was also called upon several times during the 
year by the California State Personnel Board to furnish our most 
qualified supervisors to set in on interviews and oral examinations 
to evaluate applicants for State Jobs in the stores field. 

16 



Personnel ttfere encouraged to visit trade shows and conven- 
tions held at the Civic Auditorium and at other locations to 
familiarize themselves with the latest changes in procedures, machines 
and routines. 

The Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies and the Senior 
Storekeeper attended the American Traffic Association's Convention 
held in Sacramento in May and attended the seminars conducted by the 
Stores and Purchasers Division of the Transit Association. The ex- 
change of ideas at this convention has been of great help to us as 
we progress through a heavy improvement program. 

Much favorable publicity has been given to the City by the 
daily press, radio and TV, locally and nationally, trade and national 
magazines, in connection with our sales program. 

BUREAU OP PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 

This Bureau under a Head Clerk with 15 clerical personnel, 
has charge of budgetary and personnel functions, processes purchase 
orders, checks and transmits invoices to Controller for payment, sells 
charters, codes and other documents and procures official bonds for 
officers and employees. 

During the fiscal year 33,239 "regular" purchase orders in 
amount C'17» 31^*932 and 10,824 "petty" purchase orders amounting to 
0289,7^1 were processed. Table No. 1 in the appendix shows the work 
accomplished in detail. 

Sales of Charters and codes amounted to £8,072 and sales of 
other documents to Cl»373. 

Continuing studies are being made in an endeavor to reduce 
the number of purchase orders being processed. 

During the year two or more requisitions were included in 
one purchase order, wherever possible, thus reducing the number of 
purchase orders issued. 

Additional space is needed for storage of documents which 
are for sale, as several new codes have been published in recent 
years. 

A new position of Senior Clerk is urgently needed for ad- 
ditional supervision, to perform other work, and to act for the Head 
Clerk in his absence 

Statistics showing comparison of expenditures with budget 
allowances and comparison of revenues with estimated revenues are 
shown in the appendix on Table No. 2. 



17 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Purchasers Central Shops and Auxiliary shops and stations 
are responsible for equipment maintenance for 5^ departments of the 
City and County of San Francisco - a total of 1600 motor vehicle 
units are maintained at the Central Shops, Park Shops and Hall of 
Justice Garage. Service is provided at the Department of Public 
Works Army Street Yard, 19th Avenue Station, Health Department Garage, 
Department of Electricity Yard, Police Motorcycle Headquarters, and 
15th Street and Harrison Station. The bulk of the work is performed 
at the Central Shops. 

The end of this fiscal year found the Central Shops, a con- 
solidation of Shops I, II and III, completing its first year in their 
new shops at 800 Cuint Street. These shops provide spacious - well 
lighted work areas and sufficient enclosed yard area for the parking 
and storage of the many vehicles under our care. 

The Central Shops have three main shop areas - 1. Automobile 
Shop 2, Truck Shop 3. Fire Engine Shop. Auxiliary shops such as 
Machine Shop, Blacksmith Shop, Wood Working Shop, Paint Shop, Hose 
Shop, Upholstery Shop, Body and Fender Shop, Tire Shop, and Service 
Station provide service for the three main areas as well as for out- 
side maintenance and repairs. A total of 90 persons are employed in 
the Bureau, The skills and classifications used are quite varied as 
is illustrated in the following list of employments: 

1 - General Superintendent 

3 - Automotive machinist foremen 

2 - Automotive machinist sub- foremen 
33 - Automotive machinists 

9 - Machinists 

3 - Auto fender and body workers 
3 - Car and auto painters 

22 - Garagemen 

2 - Patternmakers 

1 - Leatherworker-upholsterer 

3 - Blacksmiths 

2 - Blacksmith finishers 

1 - Chauffeur 

2 - Accountants 

1 - Account clerk 

Additionally a storekeeper and a general storekeeper are 
utilized on a full time basis to procure, store and issue items re- 
quired by the Central Shops. 

The Automobile Shop completed 2323 jobs on vehicles during 
this fiscal year. In addition forty new police cars were processed 
through this shop - sirens, red lights, gun racks, extra batteries, 
etc. being installed. 



The Truck Shop completed 3515 jobs during this fiscal year. 
These jobs consisted of engine - transmission - rear end repairs - 
body repairs and alterations - brake relines and adjustments - etc. 

These repairs and alterations were made on a wide variety 
of vehicle types and makes, pick up trucks - asphalt spreaders - 
ambulances - dump trucks - eductors - compressors. Every conceivable 
type of truck or heavy duty equipment is processed, 

A few of the major jobs worth noting were the complete re- 
conditioning of four (4) Eductor pumps, the reconditioning of a 
$15)000.00 asphalt laying machine, and the manufacture of a new 
heater hood for asphalt planer. These Jobs were completed at a 
saving to the city of up to 50$ over the cost of replacement items. 

The Tire Shop, a subsidiary of the Truck Shop, effected 
economy and efficiency by eliminating outside tire service to many 
vehicles (particularly those of the Fire and Health Departments). 
Tire Shop now has tires already mounted on wheels ready for immediate 
change for all such apparatus. 

The Fire Engine Shop maintained and repaired 862 units in 
the shop and answered 1917 service calls to fire houses. 

Six new American La France Combination pumpers and one 
Aerial ladder were equipped and tested for service. Safety brakes 
were installed on 12 pieces of fire apparatus. Six fire engines 
were completely rebuilt. Three late model Tank Wagons were con- 
verted; one into a battery wagon and two into Rescue Squads. This 
provided the Fire Department with first line apparatus at a fraction 
of the cost of new equipment. 

An unavoidable back log in the maintenance and repair of 
fire department ladders forced the shop into an accelerated program. 
Fifty various size fire ladders were rebuilt and twenty new ladders 
built by the shops. 

The Paint Shop, aside from the many "touch up" Jobs re- 
quired on repaired units, completely painted 2 rescue squad vehicles, 
1 aerial ladder and tractor, 1 fire bus, 1 fire pumper, 70 fire lad- 
ders, and 8 street and sewer department trucks. 

Besides motor propelled vehicles the Central Shops, sub- 
shop and garages maintain and repair: 

Fire Department- inhalators and breathing equipment, 
fire hose, two high pressure pumping stations, tanks 
and stand-by stations and equipment on the fire boat 
Phoenix. 



19 



Civil Defense-Communications stand-by plant at the 
Youth Guidance Center and 19 auxiliary fire trucks. 

Miscellaneous - Third Street Channel bridge; equip- 
ment at sewage treatment plants; parking meter col- 
lection cars and carts; park, golf course and play- 
ground equipment; park sludge pumps and sprinkler 
equipment and miscellaneous machines and mechanical 
equipment for various departments including schools. 

As was to be expected, regardless of the fact that many man 
hours went into the moving and setting up of equipment in the new 
shops, important economies and efficiencies resulted. The following 
figures illustrate the gains made by the nev; Central Shops operation: 

COMBINED EXPENDITURES FOR AUTOMOTIVE 
AND ALL OTHER EQUIPMENT MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS 

TOTAL SHOP JOBS AVERAGE COST 

YEAR EXPENDITURES COMPLETED PER JOB EMPLOYEES 

1959-60 $ 809,182.00 ?284 $ 111.09 7^ 

1958-59 698,856.00 6599 105.90 76 

INCREASE 110,326.00 685 5.19 

DECREASE 2 

The total jobs completed increased 10,38% over prior fiscal 
year with fewer persons employed. 

The average cost per Job increased v5.19, less than 5/£» At 
the same time craft wages increased approximately 12.7$, and material 
and supplies purchases approximately 26%, 

Funds for equipment maintenance and repair are provided by 
transfers to the Purchasing Department from budget appropriations to 
departments. Some additional funds are obtained from work orders. 

In prior reports the need for spare equipment has been stres- 
sed. The situation still exists. As a consequence the shops are over- 
loaded with emergency jobs and proper maintenance is difficult because 
equipment has to be rushed back into service which works a hardship 
on both the shops and the using department, and is unsatisfactory and 
expensive. 

To assist In passenger car repair a loan car program was 
initiated in March of i960. Five vehicles that were not unsightly 
and in mechanically operable order were made available to departments 
who had units in the shop for repairs and needed immediate replace- 
ment. In the last four months of fiscal year 1959-60, 17 departments 
used this service, driving a total of U^kJ miles in a period of 189 
loan out days. It Is planned to expand this program to other than 
class A cars. 

20 



IMPROVEMENTS : 

Experience indicates, after one year operation, that cer- 
tain alterations and improvements are necessary: 

1. Though hydraulic hoists were provided in the shops for lifting 
passenger cars and light trucks, no provision was made for heavy 
lifting of fire trucks, dump trucks, and other heavy duty rigs. 
Three heavy duty twin post hoists will be needed in the Truck 
Shop and two in the Fire Shop. 

2. Certain doors in the new shops are too small to drive trucks 
through for maintenance and repair and storeroom doors too small 
to accommodate a fork lift with pallets. Alterations should be 
made on 8 sliding doors and 6 windows. Funds for these improve- 
ments were requested but not allowed in the 1960-61 budget. 

3. Additional storeroom space is needed. This can be accomplished 
by the construction of 1500 square feet of mezzanine in the west 
storeroom. 

4. A fire hydrant essential for the testing of new and rebuilt pump- 
ers should be installed in the Central Shops Yard near the "Fire 
Shop". At present it is necessary for the mechanic to take the 
fire apparatus and his tools to the nearest street hydrant for 
testing. 

5. The Machine Shop presently combined with the Blacksmith Shop 
location has not worked out as expected. The noise and hammer 
vibration resulting from the operation affects precision oper- 
ation of machine tools. It is contemplated to move the Machine 
Shop to the "Aerial Shop", Aerial trucks will then be repaired 
in the more suitable area vacated by the Machine Shop. 

6. Large window areas on the west end of building allow an excess of 
bright sunlight and heat in these working areas. It will be 
necessary to shade or screen these windows for the relief of per- 
sonnel involved and because of the fact that excess sun and heat 
is drying out new and rebuilt ladders in the exposed ladder stor- 
age area. 

7. A proposed organization set-up which does not increase total per- 
sonnel but does provide for much needed supervisory personnel has 
been developed and recommended by both the Forbes Report and the 
Jacobs Survey. This organization, when put into effect, will 
provide more adequate supervision of all areas of the bureau's 
operation. 

Plans and proposals for the coming fiscal year follow: 

An improved accounting procedure is being installed to provide 



21 



more valuable Information to departments having vehicles and equip- 
ment repaired at Central Shops. Future monthly invoicing by IEM 
machine process will include the cost of the repairs and a detailed 
description of work done. Master files are being established, by 
vehicle, to provide a basis for evaluation of desireability of re- 
tention or continued repairs. 

To permit utilization of IBM facilities a controlled, coded, 
standardized system of numbering vehicles and equipment has been de- 
veloped* Under this new numbering system Central Shops will assign 
numbers which will permit immediate identification of owning depart- 
ment and type of vehicle. When the numbering system is fully im- 
plemented and the new accounting procedures are in effect more in- 
formation will be available rapidly at less cost. 

Plans are completed for the conversion of "out of service" 
fire department apparatus to modern serviceable fire fighting units. 
Work on these units will commence with the new fiscal year. 

The following units are involved in this program: 

5 - 1957 Seagrave pumpers to be converted to Triple 

Combination (pump, hose, water) units, 
1 - 1950 Tank Wagon to Truck tractor, 
1 - La France 19^4 tank wagon to Hose tender. 
1 - La France 19^8 tank wagon to Salvage wagon. 
3 - Various Tank Wagons to Relief Hose Tender, Foam 

Company and Service Company vehicles. 

Fifty- two (52) new vehicles for the Police Department will 
be received in August of i960. Turn-in units will be stripped of 
equipment such as sirens, red lights, gun racks, bulletin boards, 
etc. Equipment will then be installed in new units at the Central 
Shops, 

Plans have been developed and approved for the new Hall of 
Justice Service Station, It is anticipated that construction will 
start in the fall of i960. The operation of this new facility will 
be the responsibility of the Central Shops, 

Table No, 3 in the Appendix shows shop expenditures and 
cost data, 

TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau provides a centra- 
lized service available to all City and County departments in machine 
accounting (IBM), blueprinting, photography, photostating, and dup- 
licating which includes mimeograph and offset printing. 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau was established in 
19^5 for the purpose of accomplishing two objectives. First, to 

22 



place electronic accounting machines (IBM) and city-owned photo- 
graphic, blueprinting and other reproduction equipment in a central 
location where use would be made available to all city departments, 
and second, to eliminate unnecessary duplication of expensive equip- 
ment with its attendant cost of operation and maintenance. 

The plan has proven most successful. Each year since its 
inauguration a greater number of city departments has made use of 
the services offered. In mimeograph work alone at least ten or 
twelve departments including the Controller, Purchasing, City at- 
torney, Board of Supervisors, Municipal Court, and Retirement have 
taken advantage of the facilities offered by this bureau rather than 
replace obsolete equipment. 

During the fiscal year 1959-1960 the volume of work proces- 
sed for city departments totaled 0212,619.83, an increase of 
£10,366.56 over the previous fiscal year. This ratio of increase 
in the volume of work has been constant over the years. 

The bureau is administered by a Supervisor of Tabulating 
and Reproduction, assisted in matters concerning technical and ac- 
counting procedures by a Supervisor of Tabulating, a Photographer, 
and an Account Clerk. Funds for operating expenses are provided by 
budget transfers and work orders from city departments, 

TABULATING SECTION - ROOM 158. CITY HALL : 



PERSONNEL; 



1 - Supervisor of Tabulating 

1 - Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 

7 - Tabulating Machine Operators 

6 - Key Punch Operators 



EQUIPMENT; 



9 - Key Punch Machines 
3 - Sorting Machines 
3 - Collators 
1 - Interpreter 

1 - Summary Punch 

2 - Reproducers 

3 - Accounting Machines 

The major and recurring operations of the Tabulating Section 



are: 

Department 

Municipal Court 

Civil Service Commission 



Function 

Processing Traffic Citations 
Salary Survey Data 
Salary Standardization Reports 
Recruitment Records 



23 



Department 
Controller 



Tax Collector 
Registrar of Voters 
Department of Public Health 



Purchasing Department 



Public Works 

Bureau of Engineering 

Public Utilities 

Bureau of Light, Heat & Power 



Function 

Tabulation of Official Bonds 

Cancelled Warrant Report 

Summary of Unpaid Property Taxes 
Purchase Order Encumbrance Posting 
Report 

License Tax Accounting for Apart- 
ments, Hotels, Food Inspection, etc. 

Election Officer Payroll Reports 

Election Statistics 

Birth and Death Plaster Index and 
Statistics 

Budget Statistics 

Cost Accounting-Central Office and 
San Francisco General Hospital 

T.E. Patient Subsidy Reports 

Emergency Hospital Statistics 

Equipment Inventory 

Central Warehouse Inventory 

Stores Stationery Control 

Records of Average Use 

Fee Tag Reports 

Purchase Order Registers 

Shop Expenditure Reports 

Contract and other Statistics 

Record of Accepted Streets 

Distribution and Accounting Record 
of the Consumption of Gas and 
Electricity by City Departments 



Recruitment Records, for the Civil Service Commission, 
concern the machine processing (IBM) of paper work in connection 
with the examination procedures of the Commission and is a new oper- 
ation in the Tabulating Bureau that was Inaugurated this year. Ap- 
plication of this phase of examination procedure to a system of auto- 
mation was first surveyed by the International Business Machines 
Corporation who recommended the establishment of a separate in- 
stallation in the offices of the Civil Service Commission. Sub- 
sequently, we were requested to review the recommendations of IBM 
and the result of our survey disclosed that a saving of approximately 
C'5,000 per year could be effected by utilizing the services of the 
Central Tabulating Bureau. 

This operation includes machine preparation of "Credential 
and Notice to appear for Examination"; "Notice of Ineligibility" which 
indicates the candidate's total score in relation to the passing score 
required; "Notice of Eligibility" which indicates the candidate's 
rank on the list of eligibles, his score in each phase of the examin- 
ation, and his total score; a media for printing the "List of Eligi- 
bles"; and finally a "History Card" for each eligible candidate. 



24 



In 1961 the Tabulating Section will expand its operation 
to include a central tabulating unit in the new Hall of Justice. 
Establishment of a messenger service between the two locations will 
preclude the necessity of renting additional expensive equipment un- 
til required by future expansion through new applications. 

REPRODUCTION SECTION; 

The Reproduction Section of the Bureau occupies two loca- 
tions in the City Hall, Room 50 in the basement and space on the fifth 
floor which can only be reached by a stairway from the fourth floor. 
This arrangement is bad in many respects. It affects efficiency of 
operation by reason that work in progress must be carted back and 
forth between the two locations to accomplish various steps for com- 
pletion. It means that deliveries of supplies from vendors and de- 
livery and pickup of work by city departments must be made in two 
locations, one of these requiring that heavy loads must be carried 
up or down a steep stairway. 

In the fiscal year 1958-1959 initial steps were taken to 
remedy this situation by providing additional space which adjoins 
Room 50 in the basement of the City Hall. It is our sincere hope 
that the way and the means may be found to accomplish this objective 
during the fiscal year I96O-I96I. Replacement of heavy, bulky blue- 
printing equipment cannot be delayed further because of condition of 
existing equipment. Additional delivery costs involved in placing 
this equipment on the fifth floor and subsequent expense to move to 
the basement location make the proposed move advisable at an early 
date. 



PERSONNEL: 



1 - Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction 

1 - Photographer 

1 - Photographer, as needed 

1 - Photostat Operator 

1 - Photostat Operator, part time 
3 - Blueprint Operators 

2 - Duplicating Machine Operators 
1 - Account Clerk 



EQUIPMENT; 



1 - Blueprint Machine 

2 - Ammonia Process Machines (dry process) 

1 - Photostat Machine 

2 - Microfilm Cameras 

2 - Mimeograph Machines 

1 - Offset Duplicating Machine 

Cameras 

Enlargers 

Printers, etc. 



25 



Major functions of the Reproduction Section: 



Departments 

All 

Various (20) 

Assessor 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasing 

Treasurer 

Recreation & Park 



Unified School District 
Public Works Engineer!:^ 
Bureau of Architecture 
Recreation & Park 
Unified School District 

Public Works 

City Attorney 

Unified School District 

Assessor, Public Works, 
Real Estate, Recorder, 
and Tax Collector 



Functions 
Reproduction of - 

Departmental Budget Es imates 

Annual Reports 

Real Property Transfer Records 

Opinions and other Legal Papers 

Calendars and Ordinances 

Bids, Specifications and Pur- 
chasing Records 

Microfilm Record of Checks 
Deposited 

Specifications for Construction, 
Maintenance and Repair of Build- 
ings, Parks and Recreation 
Facilities 

Annual Budget of all Schools 

Contract Sets of Blueprints for 
Construction, Maintenance and 
Repair of Public Buildings, 
Street, Sewers, and Recreational 
Facilities 

Photography in Connection with 
Construction Progress, Earth 
Slides, Accidents, Redevelop- 
ment and Planning. 

Blueprinting of Block Maps of the 
City and County 



In addition to these recurring activities all blueprinting, 
dry process printing, photography, photostat, microfilm, and dup- 
licating (offset and mimeograph) work required by 52 city depart- 
ments is done in the Bureau, 

Replacement of the blueprint machine is urgently needed. 
The present machine was purchased in 19*+ 7 and has exceeded its nor- 
mally expected operational life by about four years. To Insure un- 
interrupted service to city departments in major operations listed 
above, funds for replacement should be included in the 1961-1962 
Budget of the City and County. 

A study will be made of work distribution and equipment use 
before the new tabulating unit is established in the Kail of Justice. 

Every effort is being made to keep current on advances that 
are made in Electronic Data Processing as applicable to City functions. 



26 



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TABLE NO. 1 
Showing 
Purchase Order Processing 
1959-60 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



l??8-?9 



Purchase 
Orders 



Amount 



General 


16,922 


06, 730, 230 


16,582 


06,206,650 


Education 


5,635 


2,955,03^ 


5,612 


2,740,630 


Health 


4,672 


2,191,560 


4,682 


2,083,463 


Utilities 


6,010 


5,438,108 


6,204 


9,323,311 


Petty Purchase 
Orders (not 
exceeding 050) 


10,824 


289,741 


10,988 


277,957 



Total 



44,063 017,604,673 



44,068 020,632,011 



TABLE NO. 2 

EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
appropriations except Personal Services for 1959-1960: 



Account 


Budgeted 


Expended 


Surplus 


Deficit 


Contractual Services 
9.311.200.000 


22,488 


22,374 


114 




Materials & Supplies 
9.311.300.000 


12,475 


12,625 ** 




150 


Equipment 
9.311.400.311 


21,280 


21,088 


192 




Premium on Official Bonds 
9.311.812.311 


8,317 


7,879 


438 




Premium on Auto Insurance 
9.311.813.311 


24,500 


24,492 


8 




Membership Dues 
9.311.85^.311 


760 
89,820 


760 

89,218 






Total 


752 


150 




REVENUES 









Comparison of Revenues with Estimated Revenues in 1959-1960 budr 
get: 

Account 

7061 Sale of Documents 

7062 Minor Sales 

7063 Damages 

7064 Miscellaneous Sales 
7451 Sale of Sludge 
7621 Sale of Grease & Bones 

Total 10,378 7,260 4,271 1,153 

**Included Purchase Orders for Office Supplies encumbered for 
$181 not yet liquidated. 



Estimated 
Revenue 


Actual 
Revenue 


Over 


Under 


& 1,500 


1,373 


127 




7,000 


3,477 


3,523 




278 





278 







885 




885 





268 




268 


1,600 


1,257 


343 





TABLE NO. 3 
SHOP EXPENDITURES 



Object 
Administrative Salaries 
Wages 

Contractual Services 
Materials & Supplies 
Retirement 
Work Orders 

Total 

Contractual Services 
Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 

Materials and Supplies 
Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 
Total 



Appr opr i a t i on 
9.312.110.000 
9.312.130.000 
9.312.200.000 
9.312.300.000 
9.312.800.000 



9.312.200.000 

$ 63,559.00 

32,477.00 

$ 96,036.00 
5,256.00 

9.312.300.000 
$ 141,393.00 
49,972,00 

£ 191,365.00 
4.127.00 



Amount 

16,261.00 

455,108.00 

90,780.00 

187,238.00 

9,882.00 

49,913.00 

$ 809,182.00 

Expenditures 



90,780.00 



187,238.00 
£ 278,018.00 



DOCUMENTS 
SEP 21 1961 



BAN FRANCISCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT 



September, 1961 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 

ZONE 2 



September 8, 1961 



Annual Reoort 

Fiscal Year 1960-1961 

Mr. Sherman P. Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Duckel: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1961 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department issued Uj.,313 purchase 
orders and miscellaneous encumbered contracts totalling $16,731,790 
maintained 26 storerooms, sold $93,200 surplus city property in 18 sales, 
did 7U8I4. shop jobs amounting to $8U5>,S>20 and expended $211,915 on repro- 
duction and tabulating. Purchasing was conducted for all city depart- 
ments, shop operations for 5u departments and reproduction and tabulating 
for 5>5 departments. 

Every effort is being made to give departments faster and better service. 
Purchase order processing was speeded by changes in procedures, shop time 
was reduced by better planning, and tools and other functions accelerated. 

The department cooperated in every way possible with the Purchaser's Task 
Force - Mayor's Committee on Municipal Management. Some task force 
recommendations were effected where these could be accomplished with 
existing facilities, personnel and funds. 

The problems associated with operating with temporary help were of con- 
cern particularly at the main office in the City Hall and in stores. 

The following statements on the activities of the department for the past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, 
dated August 22, 1961. 



1. 



There are no capital programs on Purchasing Department 
facilities. 



2. Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated 
in the annual report include: 

(a) Establish specification and control system for buying on 
a full time basis. 



- 2 - 
Mr. Sherman P. Duckel September 8, 1961 

Chief Administrative Officer 

(b) Establish better control for stores by use of standard 
coding and automated records. 

(c) Establish definite policies on motorized equipment 
replacement. 

(d) Change purchasing limits particularly for cash purchases 
and non-competitive buying. 

(e) Expand services of Tabulating Division to serve other 
city departments. 

(f) Expand the Purchasing Department's space on the 2nd 
floor of the City Hall. 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other 
than those for personal services with original budget 
appropriations for l°60-196l is given in the appendix, annual 
report. Funds for departments activities are obtained mainly 
by transfers from budget appropriations of other departments. 

ii. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the 
budget of 1960-61 is given in the appendix, annual report. 

5. The budget aopropriations of other departments for automotive 
and other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduc- 
tion, should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase 
in work required, and for steadily increasing labor and material 
costs, 

6, The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual 
report. 

As Purchaser of Supplies I believe that all bureaus have performed their 
functions in a very fine manner. The bureau heads and employees are 
commended for their efficiency and loj r alty to the department and the City. 



Very truly yours, 



BEN BENAS 

Purchaser of Supplies 



September, 1961 
. "'TOIL REPORT 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and 
contractual services for all departments for the City and County, including 
city-owned utilities, and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs 
and maintains automotive and other equipment for the various departments 
except Public Utilities and for the School District as requested; operates 
a central tabulating and reproduction bureau for departments requiring its 
services; transfsrs to other departments for use or sells equipment and 
supplies no longer useful to any department of the city; maintains a 
perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and operates 
central stores of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the 
Shops on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on 
new products, specifications and prices, 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 201 in five bureaus, the same as in 195>9-60. The 
organization of the Department is shown on the Organization Chart in the 
appendix. 

Supervisory - June 30, 19^ 

Adninis trative 

B. Eenas - Purchaser of Supplies 
H. Shiman - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buying 

T. F. Conway - Chief Assistant Purchaser - Eurcau Head & Asst. Dept, Head 
J, C, Gavin - Senior Assistant Purchaser 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. E, Leary - Supervisor of Equipment and Supplies - Bureau Head 
H. R. Stevens - Senior Storekeeper 

Personnel and Accounts 

J, Erackett - Head Clerk - Bureau Head 

A. Arnold - Head Clerk - To Jan. 1, 1961 

- 1 - 



Bureaus - Continued 



Shops 

A. 
J. 
R. 

B. 



M. Flaherty - Superintendent of Shops - Bureau Head 
Fischer - Foreman Auto Machinist 
Johnstone - Foreman Auto Machinist 
Shain - Foreman Auto Machinist 



Tabulating and Reproduction 

G. A. Stanley - Supervisor of Reproduction - Bureau Head 
J. ¥. Bender - Supervisor of Tabulating 

The valued services of the following were separated from city employment 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment: 

Approx. Years 
Name Position City Service Date 



Retired 

V. L. Cleary 
Ella Debenham 
D. J. Flanagan 
A. K. Arnold 
F. Coulman 
F. D. Cosgrove 
J, Paiva 

Died 
W. J. Ford 



Blacksmith Finisher 
General Clerk Typist 
Assistant Stationery Buyer 
Head Clerk 
General Storekeeper 
General Storekeeper 
Auto Machinist 



Storekeeper 



20^ 


8-1-60 


16 


10-1-60 


U6-J- 
30f 
16| 
12§ 
30§ 


12-1-60 


1-1-61 


l-l-cl 


3-1-61 


3-1-61 



33% 



1-13-61 



Mrs, A. K. Arnold retired as Head Clerk in the Purchaser's main office 

on January 1, 1961, after 30| years of city service. Her efficient handling 

of the section having to do with bids and tabulations resulted in maximum 
service to using departments. 

Work Accomplished 

The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail under 
the separate bureaus, remained substantially the same as in 1959-1960, except 
for reduced purchases for public utilities. Major accomplishments are indicat- 
ed in the following table : 



Bureau 


Unit 




1959-1960 




1960-1961 


Buying 


Purchase Orders 




UU.063 




UU,313 




Amount 


$ 17,60U,673 


$16, 


Equipment & Supplies 


Sales Number 




16 




18 




Sales Amount 


$ 


110,276 


$ 


93,200 




Major Stores Operated 




15 




15 


Shops 


Job Orders 




7,281; 




7,484 




Expenditures 


$ 


809,182 


$ 


81r5,520 


Tabulating and 


Expenditures -Tabulating 


$ 


10U,721 


$ 


111,390 


Reproduction 


Expenditures - Reproduct 




107,899 


*p 


100,525 



- 2 - 



GENERAL COMMENTS 

The changes made in paper work associated with purchase orders, bids 
and specifications as a result of a system study by this department simplified 
and reduced office work. Every effort was made to reduce the numbers of 
purchase orders by extended use of the encumbrance method for service contracts. 
Expanded use of term contracts and blanket orders continued, A specification 
and control section formed for studies which cannot be done by buyers without 
impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis because of lack of 
personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time is clearly 
apparent in view of rapid technological advances in processes, equipment, 
and materials and supplies. 

Changes xrere made in the method presenting data with equipment 
requisitions and for some categories of supplies to assure purchase of items 
most suitable for the needs of operating departments under competitive bid 
conditions . 

In addition to the normal work load the Purchasing Department purchased 
furniture, equipment and supplies for the New Hall of Justice and for new wards 
at Laguna Honda Home,, 

Storekeeping records and control and storerooms were materially improved 
because of more direct supervision, improved methods, and departmental 
cooperation. The bureau, however, has been handicapped because of lack of 
personnel and the extended use of temporary employments. 

The Central Shops at 800 Quint Street continued to function with 
increased efficiency as indicated by better condition of city vehicles. Some 
obsolete equipment was replaced, and other units are scheduled for replacement 
as funds are made available. The consolidation of operations by functions has 
resulted in the most efficient use of equipment and personnel. The Shops 
reconverted Fire Department obsolete motorized equipment to modern needed 
units at material savings. 

No changes in number or classification of p rsonnel for Tabulating or 
Reproduction Bureau are indicated except one blueprint operator should be 
reclassified to a sub-foreman operator to provide supervision in the blue- 
print room on the fifth floor of the City Hall, The blueprinting facilities 
should be relocated to the basement of the City Hall to provide easy access 
and better control. 

The need for reorganizing accounting and clerical functions is apparent. 
Changes in classification of supervisory personnel have been recommended in the 
recent Civil Service classification survey. Any action on reorganization will 
be delayed pending that taken on the survey recommendations. 

Considerable time was spent by the Purchaser, bureau heads and personnel 
on working with, making reports, and providing data for the Blyth-Zellerbach 
Survey, 

- 3 - 



General Comments - Continued 

A committee composed ox Mr. R. Brooks Darter, Assistant Director, 
Administrative, Department of Public Uorks, Mr. Joseph Mignola, Executive 
Assistant, Chief Administrative Officer and the Purchaser of Supplies, con- 
tinued a study on the application of electronic data processing (EDP) to 
departments under the Chief Administrative Officer, 

The need for additional office space at the City Hall is critical. 
This matter will be considered when the Bureau of Building Inspection, 
Department of Public T 'forks moves to Ir^O McAllister Street, scheduled for 1962, 

STUDIES AND IIlPROVBiENTS 

As stated under the separate bureaus, studies for improvement and 
simplification of operations continued. 

Studies 

Studies are continually being made on methods and procedures to reduce 
the large number of purchase orders issued for small nurchases. A method 
involving the extended use of the Purchaser's Revolving Fund and increased 
limits for cash purchases is expected to be put into effect in 1961-62 to 
assist in accomplishing this. 

The study on purchase order processing and writing resulted in the 
proposed use of the "Friden Flexowriter", expected to be installed about 
January, 1962 , 

The continued study of storekeeping methods resulted in improved 
operations , 

Studies were made in Shop operations to determine what work should be 
done by city forces or by contract. 

The Reproduction Section continually studied form design i\ r ith depart- 
ments for easier and less costly reproduction. The Tabulating Section 
conferred with departments to determine new areas or expanded use particularly 
with reference to the New Hall of Justice and City Hall, 

Improvements 

Improvements were made to the Purchasing Department offices at the City 
Hall by installation of new files. 

New employee facilities were installed at the Central Warehouse, 



- h - 



CIVIL DEFENSE 



Planning and programming of Purchasing Department Civil Defense 
activities continued under Mr. C. P. Webster, Department Civil Defense 
Co-ordinator. The follovring is the report of Civil Defense activities 
of the Purchasing Department during the fiscal year: 

(A) This department, operating as Supply Service, took an active part 
in "Command Post Exercise" of September 30, I960, and in "Operation 
Alert 1961" on April 28, 1961. Representatives of Supply Service 
met on several occasions with members of the Petroleum Coordinating 
Committee and other Civil Defense officials to discuss and resolve 
various problems. 

(B) Disaster Instructions for employees were prepared, reviewed with 
employees, and posted in the various areas occupied by Purchasing 
Department personnel, 

(C) Plans were being made as to sources of and procedures for obtaining 
the many items shown on lists of emergency supplies submitted by 
various city departments. 



-5- 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, 
contracts for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco 
Unified School District. Except for term contracts based on estimated 
quantities, all buying starts with receipt of requisition from the using 
department. Included in or incidental to the procurement function are 
the following: 

I. Buying - Bids and Awards 

A. Preparation of bids : 

1. Technical specifications 

2. Contractual conditions 

B. Advertising and mailing bids 

C. Opening and tabulating bids 

D. Preview and award of bids 

1, Determination of suitability of alternate offers 

a. Review of specifications and information furnished 
by bidder 

b. Laboratory and operating tests 

c. Investigation of use by others 

d. Other investigations and analysis 

2, Determination of bid compliance with legal and contrac- 
tual requirements. 

E. Preparation of contracts 
II. Buying - Related Functions 

A, Specifications and control 

1. Analysis of records of average use 

2. Specifications 

a. Development and revision 

b. Maintenance of specification file 

3. Inception of new term contracts 

a. Determination of desirability 

b. Preparation of technical specifications and contrac- 
tual conditions 

U. Review of: 

a. Policies 

b. Methods 

c . Forms 



PERSONNEL 

The Buying Division is headed by the Chief Assistant Purchaser and 
includes 10 assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the Bureau of 
Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, nailing, opening and tabulating 
bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and t Tr ping contracts. 
Funds for some of these employments , both buying and clerical, are provided 
by other departments. 

Detailed emoloyments are as follows : 

1 - Chief Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 
1 - Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 
7 - Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 
1 - Printing and Stationery Buyer 
1 - Assistant Stationery Buyer 

opelv. : 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for 
items of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period 
make it advisable te temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as tc the over-all progress and problems. 

"very effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible 
but delajrs occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished 
with requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly 
for equipment items that are to bo grouped for purchase for purposes of 
standardization and economy. 

As previ >usly stated all purchasing done in this office with the 
exception f term contracts based on estimated quantities starts with the 
receipt of a Requisition for Purchase Order from the using department. The 
suitability of the article or service purchased is directly related to the 
completeness and accuracy of the information contained in the requisition. 

Upon receipt in the Purchasing Department the requisition is assigned 
to an Assistant Purchaser who is responsible for first determining as far as 
practical if the information furnished is sufficient to ensure that the 
article or service to be purchased will be suitable for its intended use. 

In requisitions for equipment, materials and supplies the degree and 
extent of such information is contingent upon the nature of the article to 
be purchased. The following examples of check factors which apply to equip- 
ment items specifically but which are to some extent applicable to many other 
articles are particularly important when bids are required: 

- 7 - 



OPERATIONS - Continued 

1. Is reference made, by manufacturer's or brand name and model 
number, to an acceptable item to be used as a quality standard? 

2. If physical specifications are included: 

a. Is the need for restrictive details readily apparent or have 
they been fully explained? 

b. Are unnecessary specification details included? 

c. If dimensions or capacities are given, have reasonable 
tolerances been indicated or is the need for soecific 
dimensions or capacities readily apparent or fully explained? 

3. Are performance requirements clearly set forth? 

If requisitions are for services for which bids i;ill be required the 
information desired varies somewhat from that necessary for tangible articles 
but the basic concept is the same - are requirements fully and completely 
expressed with no restrictive factors included unless the reasons for such is 
readily aooarent or fully explained. 

The Purchasing Department requests the cooperation of other depart- 
ments in preparing requisitions that will comply with the competitive purchase 
requirements of the Charter and Administrative Code, permit the most economical 
expenditure of public money and provide the most suitable articles or services 
for City and School District use. Departments are invited to discuss prep- 
aration of requisitions (as well as other ourc basing methods) with the Purchas- 
ing Department. 

Specifications are constantly being reviewed and revised, where 
desirable, in order that the most suitable articles or services be procured 
for city use, Sugested changes in or comments regarding specifications are 
solicited. 

The method for internal checks established in 1953-59 were continued. 
These have freed supervisory personnel from the necessity of checking routine 
buying functions in detail. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1, Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional 
term contracts for articles and services where desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is 
apparent if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its 
purchasing functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basis 
as time is available. Every effort should be made to procure a full time 
employment, preferably a Senior Assistant Purchase^ for this work. 



Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into Tor various services 
and commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a 
department. The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting 
when individual bids are requested and elimination of the costs involved in 
individual bids. A recent addition to the list of term contracts provides 
for moving household and office equipment. Departments have been notified 
to inform the Purchasing Department regarding services or articles that 
might be advantageously purchased for them on term contracts. 

Procurement of insurance in accordance with the provisions of 
Section 21,2-1 of the Administrative Code has been continued. Substantial 
savings were effected in vehicle liability insurance. Now covered are all 
City vehicles except Municipal Railway revenue vehicles and Police, Fire and 
Health emergency vehicles. 

The extension of definite quantity contracts to cover occasional 
recurring purchases during the fiscal year has been satisfactorily expanded 
to cover many items of equipment used in some quantity by the San Francisco 
Unified School District, 

New term contracts initiated during the year includes 

1. Sound Equipment Operation and Rental 

2. Liquid Firefighting Foam 

3. Rebuilding Parking Meter Timers 
Uc Photographs of Sewer Interiors 

5. Reworking Street Car Springs 

6. Bulk Liquid Carbon Dioxide 

7. Reinsulating Metal Castings 

8. Re-upholster Airport Furniture 

9. Paint Jobs on Repaired Automobiles 
10. Fire Fighters ' Protective Clothing 

Large or unusual purchases during the year include the following: 

1. Equipment for the New Hall of Justice. With the cooperation 
of the Bureau of Architecture and departments who will occupy 
the building a high degree of uniformity was achieved in 
office furniture, 

2. Planetarium for San Francisco City College. 

3. New Scoreboards for Kezar Stadium. 

U. Broadcast educational television and radio studio for 
San Francisco City College, 

5. Emergency procurement of equipment and supplies for new ward 
at Laguna Honda Home, 

During the fiscal year Ulj.,313 purchase orders and miscellaneous 
encumbered contracts were issued in the total amount of $16,731^790. Detailed 
analysis is shown in Table No. 1 in the Appendix. 



GEIOL'.L 

TESTING- METHODS - File Cabinets 

The purchase of a substantial quantity of metal filing cabinets for 
the Nov Hall of Justice made it feasible and desirable to perform tests 
which would permit, as far as possible, an objective evaluation of the 
equipment offered. Physical tests and accelerated use test developed by 
the Federal Government were used. In brief, the test provided for unusual 
distortion of the cabinet by controlled methods to determine rigidity and 
durability; and, to determine useful life, for a drawer to be opened and 
closed 50,000 cycles. Several local jurisdictions have devised their own 
tests based on the Federal Specification test but it was decided to use 
applicable portions of the Federal test, exactly as set forth in Specifica- 
tion AA-F-35>9, as being familiar to all manufacturers. It is felt that 
the file cabinets selected on the basis of the tests are of high quality, 
suitable in all respects for long, hard, trouble-free use. The drawer 
cycle test was made with apparatus designed and built at the Purchasing 
Department Shops where all tests vere made by skilled mechanics under close 
control and supervision. 

STUDIES & IMPROVEMENTS 

A. Studies 

A syster.s analysis and work simplification studjr was made of each 
operation and foim processed in the Buying and Ace canting Bureaus, 
This study embodied following each form in sequence from its inception 
to final disposition. Changes were then made in processing and some 
steps and records eliminated resulting in time and cost savings. 

B. Improvements 

During the 1961-1962 fiscal year it is proposed to : 

1« Install a new purchase order writing unit which wi.ll speed the order 
writing, automatically extend and total item prices, and furnish 
badly needed statistical data. 

2. In connection with the new order writing machine, develop a material 
code for City-wide use, which when used with the machine will 
expedite purchasing and make possible full utilization of resulting 
statistical data. 

3. Continue to improve wo rk simplification, forms, procedures and 
specifications and add term contracts as desirable. 

The above is to be accomplished, as far as possible, with existing 
personnel. Complete fulfillment of these aims and other advisable 
studies and improvements is contingent upon the establishment of a new 
position of Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies to head and form the 
nucleus of a Specifications and Control Section, 

- 10 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL Aim ACCOUNTS 

This Bureau, supervised by a Head Clerk with 25 clerical employees; 
has charge of budgetary and personnel functions, processes bids, purchase 
orders and contracts; checks invoices for oayment by Controller, sell charters, 
codes and other documents, and procures official bonds for officers and employees. 

During the fiscal year 33,090 "regular" purchase orders totalling 
$15,660, I4I7; 11,223 "petty" purchase orders totalling $302,065; and miscellaneous 
encumbered contracts totalling $769,308 were processed. Table No. 1 in the 
Appendix shows details of purchase orders processed. 

Sales of charters and codes amounted to $7771 and other documents $835* 

Discounts earned during the fiscal year amounted to $lj.2,208 or 99.0 of 
the total allowable. 

The Administrative Code was amended during the year to provide for a 
blanket bond for officers not required by the Charter or State law to give 
individual bonds. This will eliminate a great deal of detail formerly required 
in this department, as well as in the Controller's and Recorder's offices, in 
handling approximately one hundred individual bonds. 

Statistics showing comparison of expenditures with budget allowances and 
comparison of revenues with estimated revenues are shown in Table No. 2 in the 
Appendix. 

STUDIES AND IMPROVEMENTS 

S tudies 

The discontinuance of pasting copies of newspaper advertisements on all 
copies mailed to prospective bidders saved many hours of labor and reduced 
purchase costs of extra copies of newspaper advertisements. 

The extended use of the method of encumbering funds for definite periods 
on service and other contracts, where the monthly payment is constant and paying 
from departmental encumbrance requests, will reduce the number of purchase 
orders processed and simplify office procedure. 

Improvements 

An extensive study has shown that the use of automation in the processing 
of requests for bids and writing of purchase orders will produce the following 
results : 

1, Expedite and increase accuracy in processing purchase orders, 

2, Provide information, not now available, regarding frequency and 
quantities of commodities used by various departments, which will be 
of material assistance in making management decisions, 

3, Release part of the time of several employees to be utilized in other 
desirable activities. 

Funds for rental of the necessary equipment have been provided in the 
1961-1962 budget. Preliminary plans for programming the work are now being maae. 

- 11 - 



BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

The Bureau of Equipment and Supplies operates and maintains central ware- 
house and storerooms in various City departments, receives and issues materials, 
supplies and equipment for all departments of the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco, and makes miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account of the 
various agencies. This Bureau arranges the sale of and sells surplus and 
obsolete personal property belonging to the City, exchanges equipment between 
departments, maintains a perpetual inventory of all materials purchased for the 
City and County of San Francisco and makes periodic checks of such property. 
The Bureau maintains control of the entire automotive fleet, including the 
listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Division of 
Sales, Inventory and Stores: 

Amount of 
Name and Location Inventory 



Central Warehouse - 15th & Harrison Stationery $12,300 

Janitorial Supplies 5,100 
2l|00 cans Foodstuffs 
Misc. Furniture 
Central Warehouse Yard - 18)4.9 Harrison St. Pipe & Sewer Material 

Department of Public Works - 2323 Army St. 83,167 

Water Department - 639 Bryant Street Ur9, 127 

Hetch Hetchy - Mocassin, California li7,282 

San Francisco Airport - South San Francisco 21,800 

Municipal Railway - 2Jith & Utah Sts. 206.957 

- General Stores 17h,800 

- Elkton Yard 170,777 

- Potrero 76,119 

- Washington & Mason (Sub-Store) 

(plus three Sub-Stores) 2ij,289 

Health Department - San Francisco Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 265,000 

- Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 133,000 

- Hassler Health Home, Redwood City, Calif. 11,312 
Public Welfare - Single Mens ' Rehabilitation Center 

Redwood City, Calif. 2,683 
Dept. of Electricity - 26U Golden Gate Ave. 

Recreation and Park 16,000 

U8,5oo 



heriff 



r 
it 



al Shop Store - Hall of Justice .Garage. -Sub-store . 75,000 

** Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory. '^> 



PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory, and Stores Divisions are staffed by the following 
permanent Civil Service personnel: 



Total 



1 

2 

1 

10 

29 

1 

Tic" 



1 - Supervisor of Equipment & Supplies 
1 - Senior Storekeeper 

General Clerk-Stenographer 

General Clerk-Typists 

General Clerk 

General Storekeeeers 



Storekeepers 
Laborer 



- 12 - 



SALTS DIVISION 

Eighteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority 
of Section 88 of the Charter, Sales activities included legal research into 
various aspects of different sales, preparation of sales, inviting interested 
buyers to bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all 
money received from buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of 
correspondence relative to the sales. 

The total revenue from sales was t93,200.U7, as follows: 

Misc. Metal Scrap and Salvage $ l8,7Hl.l6 

Trolley Coaches " 8,565.18 

Used Automobiles 29,989.55 

Used Trucks 8,027.32 
Railway Salvage Parts & Budd "./heels 21,358.22 

S-nd 1,259.U8 

Sludge 3,038.20 

Misc. Sales and Revenue 6lO,U5 

Sacks $99. hi 

Grease 668.98 

Fire Hose 3'-'2,U6 

Total Revenue from Sales $ 93,200.U7 

The Bureau continued its selling procedure on used automobiles. By 
"Spot Bid Sales", in place of sealed bids, more revenue per car is realized and 
sales are more speedily conducted and expedited. This method was well 
received by trade buyers. One hundred and thirteen passenger automobiles, 
sixty-twc trucks, and thirty-nine buses were sold, 

INV.iffTORY DIVISION 

The program for this division includes the maintenance of a perpetual 
inventory of the City's equipment, moving and transferring, investigation and 
reporting of missing or stolen property, and transferring of used equipment 
between departments. 

This division was assigned the task of coordinating the move to the 
New Hall of Justice, Procedures and manuals were set up for orderly control 
of moving eouipment and supplies which included estimates and budget 
appropriations to cover all contractual services dealing with the move. 
Meetings and conferences were held with department heads concerned to facilitate 
and expedite the proposed move. 

Due to the release of used and discarded equipment in the old Hall of 
Justice it is anticipated that most of this equipment will be rehabilitated 

obviating the need of purchasing some new equipment. 



13 - 



INVENTORY DIVISION - Continued 

An important responsibility of this division continues to be automobile 
control. The integration of the automobile administration into a central 
control, with the use of the IBM system, has been completed. This provides a 
practical, comprehensive and flexible program in dealing with acquisition, 
assignment, licensing, insurance and disposition of City's entire automobile 
fleet, valued at $1,900,000, and comprising approximately 3000 vehicles. 
Automobile insurance coverages were extended to cover all City vehicles with 
the exclusion of emergency vehicles - Police, Fire and ambulances, and Munici- 
pal Railway revenue vehicles. Insurance coverages were extended from ' 
$50/100,000 to $100/100,000 Bodily Injury Liability and $2^,000 to $100,000 
Property Damage Liability, thus affording substantially increased protection. 
Strict liaison has been maintained between the Central Shops, various depart- 
ments and California Department of Motor Vehicles. 

The Inventory Division set up a new coding system with the Central Shops 
to cover City owned vehicles, which xri.ll be used in conjunction with IBM, 
to facilitate cost accounting of automobiles repaired and serviced. 

This division is also planning a change in the method of inventorying 
all City equipment which will bring the inventory current and provide the 
department a more flexible and comprehensive system. 

The necessary furniture and office equipment was supplied offices for 
the Jacobs Survey, B?.yth-Zellerbach Commission, Retirement Actuarial Committee 
and Mayor's Safety Committee. 

STORES DIVISION 

Many changes have occurred during the past year. The Recreation and 
Park store has been stocked with all materials required to operate this division, 
most of which, in the past, had been carried at Central Tfarehouse, All 
material carried has been coded and a Kardex card control established. Having 
all material near the using division has speeded up service. 

Central Shops store is in the process of having material coded, 
eliminating all obsolete stock, and building up a stock of active moving items 
required to service equipment in active use. Charging off items under 2£# a 
unit to maintenance accounts cut bookkeeping costs in half. 

At some store divisions new types of records geared to automation are 
being established to speed the processing of requisitions and for better 
regulation and control. 

The Senior Storekeeper is working with a Purchasing Department Committee 
to establish a new universal coding system, to be used by all City departments, 
so that like items will have the same identifying code regardless of department. 

The Procurement Procedure Manual has been brought up-to-date and 
distributed to all storekeepers in the department. Manuals have been made by 
most General Storekeepers on operational procedure in their own divisions. 

- Ik - 



C-^ISRAL 

The need for more storekeeping personnel at some locations is critical. 
The same conditions prevail at Recreation-Park storeroom as was reported last 
year - only one Storekeeper to perform work normally done by a General Store- 
keeper and a Storekeeper. The Recreation and Park Commission loaned a 
laborer to assist in the stores operations. The establishment of one General 
Storekeeper would relieve the storeroom of this laborer as well as taking over 
much of the paper work (ordering, receiving and clearing of material received 
reports for payment). 

Consideration should be given to obtaining additional storekeepers in 
the Sheriff's Department. At present, there is one General Storekeeper, 
stationed at the City Hall, who requisitions and processes, however, actual 
storekeeping at field locations is being performed by two high priced jailers, 
The need for trained storekeepers is acute considering accountability for 
equipment and foodstuffs at the jail at the New Hall of Justice and the County 
Jail in San Bruno, 

Lack of adequate vacation and sick leave replacements has adversely 
effected efficient operations of some storerooms. 

The Supervisor of Zouipment and Supplies and his staff of General 
Storekeepers completed an In-Service Pilot Training Program conducted by the 
Civil Service Commission and the San Francisco Unified School District, This 
schooling provided a worthwhile medium and greatly added to skills in evaluating, 
training and handling employees. The Bureau also had its own in-training 
program. 

In conjunction with the Blyth-Zellerbach survey, to bring up-to-date 
methods used by various large corporations, the Standard Oil of California's 
Richmond Store Division and the California Packing Corporation's Alameda 
warehouse were inspected. The information obtained was later disseminated 
by the inspection group to all General Storekeepers and Storekeepers. One 
of the things learned was that automation is beneficial in handling of material 
and in record keeping. 

All store personnel were encouraged to attend the Materials Handling 
and Packaging Conference held at the Cow Palace in February, l°6l to bring 
storekeepers up-to-date on the use and availability of new types of handling 
equipment, and adaption of the equipment to their particular operation. 

Periodic meetings were held for all supervisory personnel on operating 
changes and projected procedures. 

One General Storekeeper served as the Bureau's safety officer; attended 
local meetings of the national and state Safety Council; checked and reviewed 
all accidents and safety measures with the bureau head and storekeeping 
personnel. 

- 15 - 



GENERAL - Continued 

Some Stores Divisions are operating with the new encumbrance requests 
on vendors covering a period of one year or term of a contract. This eliminates 
the necessity of typing new requisitions each month. 

Three supervisory personnel completed two separate evening courses, 
held by the University of California Extension, one on "Supervisory Methods" and 
the other on "Introduction to the Study of Public Administration", to obtain a 
better knowledge of their daily responsibilities as well as preparing for the 
future . 

The Bureau conducted surveys, audits, educational programs and made 
routine changes in personnel with a view toward more efficient, economical and 
practical administration. 

Personnel attended Civilian Defense meetings and established stations 
and programs for operations should a cataclysmic event occur. 

The Stores Division was handicapped because 5 permanent B-35>2 Store- 
keepers were not replaced with permanent employments. Operations were not 
not as efficient using 1$ non-Civil Service employees for these positions 
because of the time required for training. As a result certain storekeeping 
functions had to be neglected. 

Much favorable publicity has been given the City by the daily press, 
radio and TV, locally and nationally, trade and national magazines, in 
connection with the sales program. 



- 16 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Purchaser's Central Shops and shops and car service stations at 
other locations maintain motorized equipment for 5U departments totaling 
about 1600 units, and do other work requiring the services of the crafts 
employed. Shops aae located at Central Shops, Golden Gate Park and Hall 
of Justice. Car service is orovided at the Department of Public Work's 
Army Street Yard, 19th Avenue Station, Health Department Garage, Department 
of Electricity Yard, Police Motorcycle Headquarters, and 15>th & Harrison 
Streets Service Station. The major oortion of the work is performed at the 
Central Shops. 

With the cooperation of the Police Department and the Department of 
Public Work's Bureau of Architecture, the New Hall of Justice Service Station 
was constructed and will be placed in operation August, l?6l, to provide 
service to the Police Department and other occuoants of the New Hall of Justice 
and for City Hall and other city vehicles. Installations at the old Hall of 
Justice, Police Motorcycle Service, Southern Station, and l$th and Harrison 
Streets Service Station are to be abandoned. 

The Central Shops have throe main shop areas: 1. Automobile 2. Truck 
3. Fire, and the following auxiliaries: Machine, Blacksmith, Pattern, Paint, 
Hose, Upholstery, Body and Fender, Tire, and Service Station. 

The Bureau has 88 budgeted employments. 

1 - General Superintendent 

3 - Automotive machinist foremen 

2 - Automotive machinist sub-foremen 
33 - Automotive machinists 

9 - Machinists 

3 - Auto fender and body workers 
3 - Car and auto painters 

22 - Garagemen 

2 - Patternmakers 

1 - Leathorworker - uoholsterer 

3 - Blacksmiths 

2 - Blacksmith finishers 

1 - Chauffeur 

2 - Accountants 

1 - Account clerk 

In addition, 1 general storekeeper and 1 storekeeper at the Central 
Shops are employed full time to procure, store and issue stock. 

Automobile Shop 

The Automobile Shop completed 2k79 jobs including motor overhauls, 
clutch and transmission repairs, brake relines, accident repairs, etc. In 
addition, 50 new police cars were processed by installing sirens, red lights, 
gun racks, extra batteries, etc. 

An Alemite Wheel Aligning Unit was installed to realign vehicle front 
ends without having to depend on outside contractors. An $800 per year savings 
is expected, 

- 17 - 



Automobile Shop - - — Continued 

Automatic transmission jacks were also purchased to speed up the 
removal and replacement of automatic transmissions and a "Safe Arc" brake 
shoe grinder attachment to batter brake reline modern cars. 

Truck Shop 

The Truck Shoo repaired 28hh pieces of equipment consisting mainly 
of major overhauls on heavy dump trucks, large tank flushing trucks, sewer 
eductors, motor sweepers and road tandem rollers, olus the regular running 
repair and maintenance of trucks and equipment belonging to the Department 
of Public Works. The Truck Shop Foreman also supervises greasing and 
servicing work at the Army Street Maintenance Yard. 

Fire Shop 

The Fire Shop section of the Central Shops completed a total of 81r5 jobs 
and answered 1739 service calls for minor repairs to fire equipment in fire 
houses, a reduction of 178 from 1959-60. 

The conversion program continued at an accelerated rate - S> Seagravs 
Punps were converted to triple combination apparatus; 1 Tank Wagon to a 
Truck Company Tractor; 1 Tank Wagon to a Salvage Wagon; and 1 Aerial Truck 
was rebuilt, modernized and repainted. 

Three new American LaFrance Combination Pumpers, (one equipped with a 
Turbine Engine) and 1 new aerial ladder truck were equipped, tested and put 
into service. 

The following major maintenance and repair jobs (with numerous minor 
repairs incorporated) were accomplished: 

6 engines removed and completely overhauled 

38 clutch jobs 

66 brake jobs 

50 engine repairs 

36 transmissions repaired 

33 engine tune-ups 

58 electrical repairs 

17 rear axle jobs 

h9 main oumps repaired and packed 

23 muffler and tail pipes replaced 

5 steering gears repaired 

17 engine oil leaks repaired 

22 radiators removed and repaired 

A grease and inspection program was initiated whereby fire apparatus 
can be driven regularly to the shops for necessary grease jobs and minor 
repairs made immediately eliminating possible major repair problems. Under 
this program the garagemen changed 180 batteries and performed 71 grease jobs. 

There is insufficient man power in the Fire Department and associated 

shops. Because of the manner in which funds are budgeted it has been necessary 

to use personnel normally assigned to maintenance and repair, for conversion work. 

This problem is particularly acute in the Paint Shop. Steps for correction are 

being considered, 

- 18 - 



Pattern Shop 

The Pattern Shoo completed 88 major jobs, made 15> patterns, repaired 
hO Fire Department ladders, manufactured 17 new ladders, repaired office 
furniture, made cabinets, peg boards for the Fire Department, and made boxes 
and other equipment necessary to equip new and old apparatus. 

In respect to new ladders - the Central Shops designed, made the necessary- 
jigs and fixtures, and went into the production of a new 3E> foot extention ladder 
for the 3.F.F.D. Truck Companies. This is a lighter, more compact extention 
ladder, not commercially available, never carried before on Fire Department Truck 
Companies, and is proving to be invaluable for quick and easy handling. 

Paint Shop 

The Paint Shop completely repainted 10 D.P.F. trucks, 1 fire truck, 
major paint work on 31 fire apparatus and numerous other city vehicles. 

City seals, Police and Fire Department seals and decals, special numbers 
and letters, etc. were applied to all new and repainted city vehicles. 

Hose Shop 

Activities of the Hose Shop include: 

1. Physical and hydrostatic inspections and testing of 23,000 feet of 
various sizes of new fire hose for fire, park and utilities (airport) 
services. The distribution, identification and stamping of a 
major portion of the new hose resulted in the rotation of 18, 550 
feet of hose from high pressure to low pressure zones; an equal 
amount from low ores sure zones to the emergency reserve or "watch 
line" stocks? and finally to condemned or salvage row. From the 
salvage group approximately 7500 "selected" feet was reclaimed for 
other special uses (non high pressure) such as street cleaning, sewer, 
street repair, park, water, sheriff (Co. Jail Farms), etc, 

2. Field inspections and miscellaneous valve, hose, suction and 
extinguisher service and repairs were rendered to various engine, 
truck and special equipment companies including airport, fire boat, 
pumping stations and Department of Public Works as required or 
requested. 

3. A total of Ii3 Fire Department high pressure reducing valves were 
serviced including complete dismantling of each, cleaning, checking 
for T^ear, refitting or rebuilding, adjusting and recalibrating and 
final testing, 

h. Maintenance and repairs were extended to blueprint, photostatic and 
other miscellaneous equipment in the Reproduction Bureau as required, 

5. The year closed with the completion of tests on various competitive 
filing and card index cabinets as requested by and for the informa- 
tion of the Purchaser of Supplies. These test procedures were 
performed in accordance with Federal Specifications and were made on 
test equipment especially designed and built by Central Shop personnel. 

- 19 - 



Body and Fender Shop 

A radiator section was installed in the Body and Fender Shop. This 
section processed 250 radiators oreviously sent to outside contractors, result- 
ing in a savings of approximately $2125 in a six months period or about $8.50 
per radiator. 

Tire Shop 

The Tire Shop inspects tires on cars, trucks and fire apparatus and 
replaces with new or recaoped tires as required. 

Park Automotive Shop 

This shop is located in the Golden Gate Park Maintenance Yard and is 
charged with the maintenance and repair of 282 various pieces of Recreation and 
Park maintenance equipment, A total of 1316 jobs were cor.oleted; 7Ul auto- 
motive repairs; 575 mower repairs and, in addition, gas, oil and grease service 
was provided tc the Recreation & Park fleet. 

Ha ll of Justice Garage 

The Kail of Justice Garage, located in the basement of the Hall of Justice, 
is charged wkth the servicing and fueling of Police passenger cars and trucks. 
This facility made 912 tows, charged 1U63 batteries, changed 2920 tires, made 
10l[3 electrical repairs, made XUU3 brake and 321 clutch adjustments, did 6ll 
tune-ups, etc, during the year. Service is provided the Police Department 
7 days a week, 16 hours a day. 

It is planned to move this operation to the New Hall of Justice Service 
Station, 950 Bryant Gtrcit, September 1, 1961. 

JTUDIZS AND IMPROVZ^.r 

Studies 

1. Studies on Bureau organization to provide maximum service with 
existing or expanded personnel, 

2. Study en what relative costs and time factors of doing work by city 
shops now being done under contract with particular reference to 
motorcycle repairs and services, engine overhauls, body and fender 
work, and painting. 

3. Study on providing gas service for all vehicles at all locations. 
Improvements 

Improvements made in the Central Shops and its operations are as follows : 

1. The Machine Shoo was relocated to a more suitable area; as a result 
machine tools were set up for more efficient operation and surplus 
tools taken out of service. 

- 20 - 



Improvements - Continued 

2. A radiator repair section was set up in the Body and Fender Shop. 

3. A proposed organizational set up to Drovi.de urgently needed super- 
visory personnel as recommended by the Forbes Report and Jacobs 
Survey, was approved by the Civil Service Cormissien, Mayor, etc. 
and will be put into effect in 1961-62. 

h» An improved accounting procedure has been developed and will be put 
into effect after July 1, 1961, under which departments utilizing 
facilities of the Central Shops will be furnished individual 
invoicing on each repair jobj description and cost of xrork performed 
will be furnished on one document; the invoices will have attached 
an IBM recap by job number, unit number and chargesand a semi-annual 
report will be furnished upon request to each department showing 
total expenditures for each unit as well as for the entire depart- 
ment. If properly utilized a considerable accounting work load 
saving can be effected by the operating departments at no additional 
cost to them. 

In conjunction with this improved accounting system a uniform city- 
wide numbering system for city vehicles and equipment was initiated. 
All units repaired at the Shops have these new numbers assigned 
arid installed making it possible to immediately identify the owning 
department and to classify the "type of unit by its six digit number. 
This numbering system is expected to prove extremely valuable in the 
future in securing information on cost of repairs and operation of 
the various classes of trucks, passenger cars and miscellaneous 
equipment . 

Experience indicates, after the second year of operation, that certain 
alterations and improvements to Central Shops are necessary. These changes 
which have also been recommended by the Blyth-Zellerback Committee will be 
included in the 1962-63 Capital Improvement Program. 

1. Though hydraulic hoists were provided in the shops for lifting 
passenger cars and light trucks, no prevision was made for heavy 
lifting of fire trucks, damp trucks, and other heavy duty rigs. 
Three heavy duty twin post hoists will be needed in the Truck Shop 
and two in the Fire Shop. 

2. Certain doors in the new shops are too small to drive tracks through 
for maintenance and repair and storeroom doors too small to accommo- 
date a fork lift with pallets. Alterations should be made on 8 
sliding doors and 6 windows. Funds for these improvements were 
requested but not allowed in the 1961-62 budget. 

3. Additional storeroom space is needed. This can be accomplished by 
the construction of 15>00 square feet of mezzanine in the west store- 
room, 

U. -'. fire hydrant essential for the testing of new and rebuilt pumpers 
should be installed in the Central Shops yard near the "Fire Shop". 
At present it is necessary for the mechanic to take the fire apparatus 
and his tools to the nearest street hydrant for testing. 

- 21 - 



5. Large window areas on the west end of building allow an excess of 
bright sunlight and heat in these working areas. It will be 
necessary to shade or screen these windows for the relief of 
personnel involved and because of the fact that excess sun and 
heat is drying out new and rebuilt ladders in the exposed 
ladder storage area. 

In addition to the above, plans and proposals for the coring 
year include: 

1. Improving the operations and general layout of the Blacksmith Shop. 
Fire Department Conversion s 

2. (a) Converting 5 late model Segrave Fire Pumpers to Triple 

Combination units (pump, hose, water) to conform with the 
Fire Department's operational policy. 

(b) Converting Salvage Wagon to Special Service Squad (air-oxygen 
unit ) . 

(c) Converting surplus Tank Wagon to Hose Tender. 

(d) Rebuilding and repainting Aerial Truck apparatus. 

3. Prepare 50 new passenger cars for Police Department service. 

U. Initiating a preventive maintenance program for Police Department 
vehicles at the New Hall of Justice Service Station, by periodical 
inspection and repair, to prevent vehicular breakdown and to 
orovide more dependable ooeration. 



- 22 - 



TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau provides a centralized service available 
to all City and County departments in machine accounting (IBM), blueprinting, photo- 
graphy, photostating, and duplicating which includes mimeograph and offset printing. 

During the fiscal year 1960-1961 t he Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau pro*, 
cessed &kl, 030 traffic citations for the Municipal Court; billed and maintained 
machine accounting records of 17 ,597 license tax accounts for the Tax Collector; 
microfilmed and printed 59,653 transcripts of changes in orooerty ownership for the 
Assessor; reoroduced aporoximately 25,000 copies of 1961-1962 budget estimate sheets 
for city deoartments; printed U0,000 block maps for the Block Books of the Assessor, 
Tax Collector, Real Estate, Recorder, Public Works, Purchasing Departments and other 
blueprinting and Reproduction work. 

These examples indicate the varied data-orocessing and reoroduction operations 
performed by the bureau in serving the requirements of 55 city deoartments who make 
regular use of its facilities. Greater detail concerning ooerations of the bureau 
is given in subsequent sections of this report. The total cost to city deoartments 
for all work processed during the fiscal year 1960-1961 amounted to $211,915* 

The Bureau is administered by a Supervisor of Tabulating and Reproduction with 
the assistance of an Account Clerk who maintains all fiscal records. Funds for oper- 
ating exoenses are provided by budget transfers and work orders from city deoartments. 

TABULATING SECTION - ROOM 158, CITY HAIL 



Personnel 1 Supervisor of Tabulating 

1 Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 
7 Tabulating Machine Operators 
6 Key Punch Operators 

Equipment 9 Key Punch Machines 
3 Sorting Machines 
3 Collators 
1 Interpreter 

1 Summary Punch 

2 Reproducers 

3 Accounting Machines 

Major Recurring Functions of the Tabulating Section : 
Department 



Municipal Court 



Function 

Traffic Citations: 

Calendars, Notices, Warrants, 
Adjudication Statistics, Abstracts, 
Miscellaneous Records and Reports. 



Civil Service Commission 



Salary Standardization Reports 
Salary Survey Data Analysis 
Recruitment and Examination Records 



- 23 - 



Department 



Function 



Controller 



Tax Collector 



Registrar of Voters 



Department of Public Health 



Purchasing Department 



Budget Statistics 

Tabulation of Official Bonds 

Cancelled Warrant P.eports 

Summary of Unpaid Property Taxes 

Daily Encumbrance Posting Reports( P.O.'s) 

License Tax Accounting: 

Hotels, Apartment Houses, Food 
Inspection, Pin Ball Machines, etc. 

Election Officer Payroll 
Election Analysis and Statistics 

Birth and Death Index and Statistics 

Budget Statistics 

Cost Accounting - Central Office 

and San Francisco General Hospital 
T.B. Patient Subsidy Reports 
Emergency Hospital Statistics 

Inventories - Equipment and Warehouse 

Stores Stationery Control 

Records of Average Use (Materials) 

Fee Tag Reports 

Purchase Order Registers 

Shop Expenditure Reports 

Contracts and other Statistics 



Public Utilities 

Bureau Light, Heat, & Power 



Distribution and Accounting Records 

of Consumption of Gas and Electricity 
by City and County Deoartments 



During the fiscal year 1960-1961 plans were completed for expansion of the 
Tabulating Section of the Bureau to include a unit in the new Hall of Justice to 
serve the departments that would be located there. Realizing that the shifting of 
some of our operations to this newly equipped unit would result in available mach- 
ine time at t he City Hall, we undertook the study and development of several new 
data-processing applications. The following were approved in the budget for 1961- 
1962 and will be inaugurated in the coming months. 



De partment 
Department of Public Health 

Tax Collector 
Fire Department 



New Operation 

Accounting and Statistics for: 

Field Nursing, Sanitation Inspection, 
Mental Health Program 

Transient Hotel Occupancy Tax 

Annual Permit Renewals: 

Gas Stations, Garages, Welding and 
Paint Spray Plants, etc. 

2)4 - 



Department 

Central Shops, 
Purchasing Department 



Municipal Court 



New Operation 



Vehicle Maintenance Cost Accounting 
and Statistics 

Court Calendars, Complaints 
and Indexes (arrests) 



In line with our continued effort to improve data-processing methods and reduce 
operational cost to the departments we have adopted the use of continuous IBM ca-^d 
forms for all license tax accounting. As a result of this change we will no longer 
require a bill feed attachment on the accounting machine which rents for $600 per 
year. In addition, because continuous cards are obtainable in two-part forms, orig- 
inal and carbon copy, we save one pass of the entire billing file through the ac--» 
counting machines. This is most important because license tax accounts are increas- 
ing in number through changes made in the San Francisco Municipal Code and Machine 
time has become a major factor. For example, the reduction from four-family dwell- 
ing units to three-family dwelling units in the classification of apartment houses 
has added some seven or eight thousand license tax accounts. 

REPRODUCTION SECTION - 2 LOCATIONS, ROOM $0 BASEMENT MP 5TH FLOOR 

Personnel 1 Supervisor of Tabulating and Reoroduction 
1 Photographer 
1 Photographer, as needed 
1 Photostat Operator 

1 Photostat Operator, part time 
3 Blueprint Operators 

2 Duplicating Machine Operators 
1 Account Clerk 



Equipment 


1 
2 

1 
2 
2 

1 


Blueprint Machine 

Ammonia Process Machines (dry 

Photostat Machine 

Microfilm Cameras 

Mimeograph Machines 

Offset Duplicating Machine 


process 









Cameras 
Enlargers 
Printers, etc. 









- 2$ - 



Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Section ; 

Department Function 



All 

Various (20) 

Assessor 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasing 

Treasurer 
Recreation & Park 



S.F. Unified School District 

Public Works Engineering 
Bureau of Architecture 
Recreation & Park 
S.F. Unified School District 

Public Works 

City Attorney 

S.F. Unified School District 



Assessor, Public 'forks, 
Real Estate, Recorder, Tax 
Collector, and Purchasing Dept« 



Reproduction of: 

Departmental Budget Estimates 

Annual Reports 

Real Prooerty Transfer Records 

ODinions and other Legal Papers 

Calendars and Ordinances 

Bids, Specifications, and Purchas- 
ing records 

Microfilm Record of Checks Deposited 

Specifications for Construction, 

Maintenance, and Repair of Buildings, 
Parks, and Recreation Facilities 

Annual B udget 

Contract Sets of Blueprints for 
Construction, Maintenance, and 
Reoair of Public Buildings, Streets, 
Sewers, and Recreational Facilities 

Photography in Connection with Con- 
struction Progress, Earth Slides, 
Accidents, Redevelopment and Plan- 
ning 

Blueprinting of Block Maps of the 
City and County 



The major functions of the Reproduction Section of the Bureau, listed above, 
represent, in part, general classifications of work performed but do not indicate 
the steadily increasing workload in the fields of blueprinting, photography, photo- 
stat, microfilm, and duolicating (offset and mimeograph). The greater part of this 
work is of an urgent nature - deadlines set by ordinance, advertised dates for 
bids, and the normal requirements of deoartments. These deadlines have always been 
met by the staff of the Bureau, and as a result, a service that was inaugurated 
but a few years ago, today serves the reproduction requirements of fifty-five city 
departments. 



- 26 - 



STUDIES AND IMPROVEMENTS 



Studies 



We are coooerating in studies now being made on the use of electronic data 
Processing in connection with the procedures of city departments under t he direct- 
ion of the Chief Administrative Officer. We are also cooperating in a study con- 
cerning the establishment of a Central Computer Installation for overall city use. 
Studies are continually being made on improved methods and equipment for reproduct- 
ion work. 

Improvements 

In order to forestall any interruption of service to these departments a pro- 
gram of replacement and modernization of equipment is each year given careful con- 
sideration. In preoaring the budget estimates for the fiscal year 1961-1962, we 
included replacement of a mimeograph machine purchased by the city in 19U2 and a 
blueorint machine purchased in 19b5« These requests were approved by the Mayor and 
the Board of Supervisors. 

The ourchase of a new blueprint machine brings into sharp focus the problem of 
determining its location. At oresent, the Reoroduction Section of the Bureau occupies 
two locations in the City Hall, blueprint on the fifth floor, and all other funct- 
ions in Room 50 in the basement. This arrangement has been most unsatisfactory from 
a standpoint of receipt and delivery of material, and efficiency of operation. 
We have requested, on several occasions, that the blueprint equipment be relocated 
in soace adjoining Room £0. At the present time, the Bureau of Architec ture is 
conducting a study of the utilization of soace in the entire basement of the City 
Hall. It is hoped that, as a result of this study, additional space may be given to 
the Reproduction Bureau sufficient to relocate the blueprint equipment and provide 
for a general expansion of work areas. To delay this action means that the new blue- 
orint machine would be installed on the fifth floor at a cost of about $1,500 for 
drayage and rigging. Relocation at a later date xrould double this cost. 



- 27 - 



APPENDIX 



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TABLE NO. 1 



General 

Education 

Health 

Utilities 

Petty P.O.s 

(Not exceeding $50) 

Encumbered Contracts 

Total 



Showing 
Purchase Order Processing 
1960-61 



Purchase 
Orders 

17,386 

5,733 

1>,568 

5,1*03 

11,223 



Amount 
7,U37,858 
2,881,720 
2,211,501 
3,129,338 
302,065 

769,308 



1959-60 



Purchase 
Orders 

16,922 
5,635 
li,672 
6,010 

10,988 



Amount 
$ 6,730,230 
2, 955, 03ii 
2,191,560 
5,1*38,108 
289, 710. 



liU, 313 $16,731,790 



UU,063 $17,6QU,673 



TA3LE NO. 2 



EXPENDITURES 



Comparison of Expenditures with original budget for all appropriations 
except Personal Services for 1960-61: 



Account 

Contractual Service 

0.311.200.000 
Materials & Suoplies 

0.311.300.000 
Equipment 

0.311.U00.311 
Premium - Official Bonds 

0.311.812.311 
Premium - Auto Insurance 

0.311.813.311 
Membership Dues 

0.311. 85U.OOO 



Total 



Budgeted 


Expended 


Surplus 


Deficit 


$22,286 


$21,5LU 


$712 




12,700 * 


12,U11 


289 




1,758 


1,609 


11x9 




7,2U5 


7,318 




$73 


Uh,3Ul 


U3,593 


7h8 




760 


760 







$89,090 



$87,235 



$1,928 



$73 





REVENUES 








Comparison of revenues 


with estimated 


revenues 


in 


1960-61 : 




Account 


Estimated 


Actual 


Over 


Under 




Revenue 


Reve 


nue 


i Estimatec 


i Estimated 


Sale of Documents 




7061 


$1,000 


$835 




$165 




Minor Sales 












7062 


h,000 


L,i55 






$155 


Misc. Sales 












706U 




1,015 






1,015 


Sale of Sludge 












7U51 


U,5oo 


3,238 




1,262 




Sale of Grease 












7621 


1,200 


757 




Ui3 





Total 



$10,700 



$10,000 



$1,870 $1,170 



* Transfer of funds for $700 was made from Contractual Services 
during fiscal year. 



TABLE NO. 3 
SHOP EXPENDITURES 



Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all aporopriations 
exceot Personal Services for 1960-6l» 



Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexoended 

Materials and Supplies 
Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 

TOTAL 



$ 66,92U 

lil,55U 

ioy,h7s 

1,720 

$159,773 

23,550 
133,323 

237 





1960-61 


1959-60 


Object 


AMOUNT 


AMOUNT 


Administrative Salaries 


$ 13,727 


$ 16,261 


Wages 


113,192 


U55,108 


Contractual Services 


103,758 


90,780 


Materials and Supplies 


183,086 


137,238 


Retirement 


10,193 


9,832 


Work Orders 


55, 96U 


h9,913 


TOTALS 


$ 815,520 


$809,182 


Contractual Services 




Expenditures 



$103,758 



TOTAL 



$183,086 
$ 286, 3hU 






PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT 



9QQUWLEKLS 
SEP 27 1962 



DOCUMENTS 

SA« FRANUSCO 
PUBLIC LIBRARY 



September, 1962 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 



270 CITY HALL 
ZONE 2 



September 11, 1962 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1961-62 

Mr. Sherman P. Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Duckel: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1962 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department issued 1*0,855 purchase 
orders, totalling $16,602,171, maintained 25 storerooms, sold $60,156 
surplus city property in 16 sales, did 7519 shop jobs amounting to 
$866, 2lU and expended $217, 67U on reproduction and tabulating. Purchas- 
ing was conducted for all city departments, shop operations for 5u depart- 
ments and reproduction and tabulating for 55 departments. 

Every effort is being made to give departments faster and better service. 
The extended use of encumbrance requests, travelling requisitions, revised 
equipment requisition forms and automated purchase order writing resulted 
in more efficient purchasing. 

Control and operation of stores for the various departments was materially 
improved by continued training of personnel and improved stores procedures. 

Better service is being given to Police Department vehicles with the new 
Hall of Justice Service Station. Other shop operations were expanded 
and improved by the use of new modern shop equipment. 

More departments are using our central tabulating and reproduction 
facilities. 

Every effort was made to put those recommendations of the Mayor's Committeee 
on Municipal Management into effect which could be accomplished with exist- 
ing facilities, personnel and funds. 

The voters overwhelmingly approved a charter amendment in the June, 1962 
election to allow the Board of Supervisors by ordinance to set purchasing 
limits. This amendment resulted from the joint efforts of this department, 
the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce and City officials. Tvhen enacted 
into law this will result in more efficient and faster purchasing. 



- 2 - 

Mr. Shsrman P. Cuckel 

Chief Administrative Officer September 11, 1962 

The problems associated with operating with temporary help were of concern 
particularly at the main office in the City Hall and in stores* 

The following statements on the activities of the department for the past 
fiscal year answer the specific inquiries of the Mryor to all departments, 
dated August 10, 1962, 

1. There are no capital programs on Purchasing Department facilities. 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated in 
the annual report include: 

(a) Establish specification and control system for buying on a full 
time basis, 

(b) Establish better control for stores by use of standard coding 
and automated records, 

(c) Establish definite policies on motorized equipment replacement 
and control. 

(d) Change purchasing limits particularly for cash purchases and 
non-competitive buying. 

(e) Expand services of Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau to serve 
other city departments, 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other than those 
for personal services with original budget aopropriations for 1961- 
1962 is given in the aopendix, annual report. Funds for departments 
activities are obtained mainly by transfers from budget appropriations 
of other departments, 

U. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget of 
1961-62 is given in the apoendix, annual report, 

5, The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive and 
other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduction, should 
be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in work required, 
and for steadily increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual report, 

I wish to take this opportunity to thank you for your assistance and guidance 
given me and to the bureau heads: T. F. Conway, Buying and assistant depart- 
ment head, J, Brackett, accounting, A. H. Flaherty, Shops, J. E. Leary, Stores, 
G. A. Stanley, Tabulating and Reproduction, and to the employees of the Purchas- 
ing Department for their cooperation and loyalty without which the Department 
could not function as efficiently and as effectively. 

Very truly yours, 



BEN BENAS 

Purchaser of Supplies 



September, 1962 
ANNUAL REPORT 
PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and contractual 
services for all departments for the City and County, including city-owned utilities, 
and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and maintains automotive 
and other equipment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, and for 
the School District as requested; operates a central tabulating and reproduction 
bureau for departments requiring its services; transfers to other departments for 
use or sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any department of the city; 
maintains a perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and 
operates central stores of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to oi±ter departments by the Shops on 
equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on new products, 
specifications and prices. 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 205 in five bureaus, an increase of h over 1960-61. 
The additional employments were garagemen at the new Hall of Justice Service Station. 
The Organization Chart is shown in the Appendix. 

Supervisory - June 30, 1962 

Administrative 

B. Benas - Purchaser of Supplies 
H. Shiman - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buying 

T. F. Conway - Chief Assistant Purchaser - Bureau Head & Asst. Dept. Head 
J. C. Gavin - Senior Assistant Purchaser 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. E. Leary - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 
H. R. Stevens - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personnel and Accounts 



J. Brackett - Head Clerk - Bureau Head 

M. Wehrle - Principal Clerk - From March 1, 1962 



- 1 - 



Bureaus - Continued 
Shops 

A. M. Flaherty - Superintendent of Shops - Bureau Head 
J. Fischer - Foreman Auto Machinist 

A. Kerri - Foreman Auto Machinist (Temporary appointment) 

B. Shain - Foreman Auto Machinist 

Tabulating and Reproduction 

G. A. Stanley - Supervisor of Reproduction - Bureau Head 

J. W. Bender - Supervisor of Tabulating (Temporary assignment to EDP Staff 

February, 1962) 
H. Egliht - Acting Supervisor of Tabulating - February, 1962, to date. 

The valued services of the following were separated from city employment 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment: 

Approx. Years 
Name Position City Service Date 






Retired 

F. G. Daulton 
Richard Johnstone 
Clair Madigan 
Alfred Stettler 
John R. McNeill 
Bernadine Shumar 
Charles A. Wall 
Daniel J. Leahy 
Alfred L. Gergus 

Died 

John Zabelle 



Auto Machinist 

Automotive Machinist Foreman 
Auto Machinist 
Assistant Purchaser 
Machinist 

General Clerk Typist 
Assistant Purchaser 
Accountant 
Auto Machinist 



Garageman 







3 6 , 


7-1-61 


29} 
174 


8-1-61 


3-1-65 


25 


5-16-62 


19 


5-1-62 


13| 


6-1-62 


6-1-62 


27 


7-1-62 


32 


7-1-62 


2 


12-20-61 



Work Accomplished 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail under the 
separate bureaus, remained substantially the same as in 1960-61, Major accomplish- 
ments are indicated in the following table : 



Bureau 


Unit 




1960-1961 




1961-1962 


Buying 


Purchase Orders 
Amount 


UU,313 
$16,26U,5U7 


Uo,855 
$16,602,171 


Equipment & Supplies 


Sales Number 
Sales Amount 
Major Stores Operated 


$ 


18 

93,200 

11 


$ 


16 

60,156 

11 


Shops 


Job Orders 
Expenditures 


$ 


7,U8U 
8U5,520 


$ 


7,519 

866, 21L. 


Tabulating 
Reproduction 


Expenditures 

Expenditures 


$ 
$ 


111,390 
100,525 


$ 
$ 


116,762 
100,912 



- 2 - 



GENERAL CQS'ENTS 

The past year was gratifying because of the advancements accomplished or 
projected for the various department activities. 

The necessity to handle many small orders and the work involved in informal 
bids of less than $100 and for formal bids over $1000 has been of particular concern. 
Joint efforts of this department, the Chief Administrative Officer and the Controller 
resulted in the following steps for improvement. 

1. By ordinance, the Purchaser was allowed to loan funds from his revolving 
fund to other departments, and cash purchasing limits were raised from $l£ to $2£. 
It is expected that this will eliminate some 20 to 25 percent of the purchase orders 
now being processed. 

2. The voters overwhelmingly approved a charter amendment in June, 1962 to 
allow the Board of Supervisors by ordinance to set purchasing limits, previously 
restricted by the charter which when enacted into law will further speed up purchas- 
ing, reduce costs and simplify procedures. This amendment resulted from the joint 
efforts of this department, the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce and City officials 
and x*as also recommended by the Mayor's Committee on Municipal Management. 

3. Expanded use of the encumbrance method for service contracts, more 
blanket orders and placing more items on terra contracts simplified and improved 
purchasing. 

The specification and control section formed for studies which cannot be done 
by buyers without impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis because of 
lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time is clearly 
apparent in view of rapid technological advances in processes, equipment, and 
materials and supplies. 

A major change was use of Friden Flexowriters for bids, automated purchase 
order writing and blanket orders. New functions are continually being performed as 
the operators become better trained and more efficient. This method has been found 
to be of immeasurable value because original source data can be reused from tapes. 

Storekeeping records and control were materially improved because of more 
direct supervision, improved methods, and departmental cooperation. The bureau, 
however, has been handicapped because of lack of personnel and the extended use of 
temporary employments. 

A new method of inventory control was initiated under which department heads 
are responsible for marking and controlling items charged to them instead of by the 
inventory division of the Stores and Equipment Bureau. When the present records 
are brought up-to-date it is expected that it will be possible to more easily main- 
tain records current. 

The Stores and Equipment Bureau was responsible for moving city department 
to the new Hall of Justice and to City Hall Annex, Lt5>0 McAllister Street, These 
moves were made with the minimum of confusion and without undue delay so that 
departments could continue functioning without interuption. 



- 3 - 



The Central Shops at 800 Quint Street continued to function with increased 
efficiency as indicated by better condition of city vehicles. Some obsolete equip- 
ment was replaced, and other units are scheduled for replacement as funds are made 
available. The Shops reconverted Fire Department obsolete motorized equipment to 
modern needed units at material savings. However, to accomplish this, it was 
necessary, based on Fire Department priorities, to delay some normal maintenance. 

The need for better control of automotive vehicles, particularly passenger 
cars, is apparent. Steps were taken to prepare legislature to effect centralized 
control which will be presented to the Board of Supsrvisors in the 1962-63 fiscal 
year. This will orovide for central budgeting, controlled use, preventative main- 
tenance and replacement at the expiration of the useful life. 

The new Hall of Justice Service Station has been highly successful in serving 
the Police and other departments at the Hall of Justice and some City Hall vehicles. 
It is expected that the services provided will be expanded in coming years, particular- 
ly greasing, minor adjustments and tires. 

Personnel of the Reproduction and Tabulating Bureau worked xath many depart- 
ments on form design, reproduction problems, adaption to tabulating and others* which 
will result in the expanded use of these central facilities. 

The Purchasing Department is actively participating in the Electronic Data 
Processing program (EDP); the Purchaser is on the committee appointed by the CAO 
for application to departments under him; the Supervisor of Tabulating is now on 
leave assigned to the EDP project; a number of department employees took general 
courses in this subject. 

Funds were approved in the 1962-63 budget for relocating the present blueprint 
facilities from the 5th floor to the basement of the City Hall, adjacent to the 
Reproduction section. This move was requested for many years and is much needed. 

Funds xtfere provided for new larger Purchasing Department main offices on the 
2nd Floor of the City Hall across from the present offices. It is expected that 
this move will be accomplished early in 1963. This will provide sorely needed space 
laid out functionally for work flow. 

Considerable time was spent by the Purchaser, bureau heads and personnel on 
working with, making reports and providing data on the Blyth-Zellerbach Survey, 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

Planning and programming of Purchasing Department Civil Defense activities 
continued under Mr. C,P, Webster, Dept, Civil Defense Co-ordinator. The following is 
the report of Civil Defense activities of the Purchasing Department during the year: 

1, This department, operating as Supply Service, took an active part in the 
"Disaster Situation" resulting from a jet aircraft collision over San Fran- 
cisco, April 30, 1962, Representatives of Supply Service met with members 
of the Petroleum Coordinating Committee and other Civil Defense officials 
to discuss and resolve various problems, 

2, Disaster Instructions were reviewed vrith Purchasing Department personnel, 

3, Lists of emergency supplies submitted by various city departments were 
reviewed and procedures were being developed for obtaining these supplies, 

- h - 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, 
contracts for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco 
Unified School District. Except for term contracts based on estimated 
quantities, all buying starts with receipt of requisition from the using 
department. Included in or incidental to the procurement function are the 
following: 

I. Buying - Bids and Awards 

A. Preparation of bids: 

, 1. Technical specifications 
2. Contractual conditions 

B. Advertising and mailing bids 

C. Opening and tabulating bids 

D. Review and award of bids 

1. Determination of suitabilitv of alternate offers 

a. Review of specifications and information furnished 
by bidder 

b. Laboratory and operating tests 

c. Investigation of use by others 

d. Other investigations and analysis 

2. Determination of bid compliance with legal and contrac- 
tual requirements. 

E. Preparation of contracts 
II. Buying - Related Functions 

A. Specifications and control 

1. Analysis of records of average use 

2. Snecifi cations 

a. Development and revision 

b. Maintenance of specification file 

3. Inception of new term contracts 

a. Determination of desirability 

b. Preparation of teclinical specifications and 
contractual conditions 

km Review of: 

a. Policies 

b. Methods 

c. Forms - $ - 



PERSONNEL 

The Buying Division is headed by the Chief Assistant Purchaser and 
includes 10 assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the Bureau of 
Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, opening and tabulating 
bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and typing contracts 
Funds for some of these employments, both buying and clerical, are provided 
by other departments. 

Detailed employments are as f ollows : 

1 - Chief Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 
1 - Senior Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 
7 - Assistant Purchaser of Supplies 
1 - Printing and Stationery Buyer 
1 - Assistant Stationery Buyer 

;?:?.-. ~:::s 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for 
items of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period 
make it advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the over-all progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible 
but delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished 
with requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly 
for equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of 
standardization and economy. 

As previously stated all purchasing done in this office with the 
exception of tenn contracts based on estimated quantities starts with the 
receipt of a Requisition for Purchase Order from the using department. The 
suitability of the article or service purchased is directly related to the 
completeness and accuracy of the information contained in the requisition e 

Upon receipt in the Purchasing Department the requisition is assigned 
to an Assistant Purchaser who is responsible for first determining as far as 
practical if the information furnished is sufficient to ensure that the 
article or service to be purchased will be suitable for its intended use. 

In requisitions for equipment, materials and supplies the degree and 
extent of such information is contingent upon the nature of the article to 
be purchased. The following examples of check factors which apply to equip- 
ment items specifically but which are applicable to other articles when 
special use-requirements are involved are particularly important when bids 
are required: 



- 6 - 









OPERATIONS - Continued 

1. Is reference made, by manufacturer's or brand name and model 
number, to an acceptable item to be used as a quality standard? 

2. If physical specifications are included: 

a. Is the need for restrictive details readily apparent or have 
they been fully explained? 

b. Are unnecessary specification details included? 

c. If dimensions or capacities are given, have reasonable 
tolerances been indicated or is the need for specific 
dimensions or capacities readily apparent or fully explained? 

3. Are performance or use requirements clearly set forth? 

If requisitions are for services for which bids will be required the 
information desired varies somewhat from that necessary for tangible articles 
but the basic concept is the same - are requirements fully and completely 
expressed with no restrictive factors included unless the reasons for such is 
readily apparent or fully explained. 

The Purchasing Department requests the cooperation of other depart- 
ments in preparing requisitions that will comply with the competitive purchase 
requirements of the Charter and Administrative Code, permit the most economical 
expenditure of public money and provide the most suitable articles or services 
for City and School District use. Departments are invited to discuss prep- 
aration of requisitions (as well as other purchasing methods) with the 
Purchasing Department. 

Specif ications are constantly being reviewed and revised, where 
desirable, in order that the most suitable articles or services be procured 
for city use. Suggested changes in or comments regarding specifications are 
solicited, 

The method for internal checks established in 1958-59 were continued. 
These have freed supervisory personnel from the necessity of checking routine 
buying functions in detail. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional 
term contracts for articles and services where desirable, 

(A recent Charter Amendment, commented on in following pages, is 
expected, to make it possible to devote more time to the above 
functions but, as stated below, additional personnel will be 
required if the work is to be done to the required extent.) 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is 
apparent if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its 
purchasing functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basxs 
as time is available. livery effort should be made to procure a full time 
employment, preferably a Senior Assistant Purchaser, for this work. 

- 7 - 



Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service 

and commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a 
department. The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting 
when individual bids are requested and elimination of the costs involved in 
individual bids. A recent addition to the list of term contracts provides 
for moving household and office equipment. Departments have been notified 
to inform the Purchasing Department regarding services or articles that 
might be advantageously purchased for them on term contracts. 

Procurement of insurance in accordance with the provision of 
Section 21,2-1 of the Administrative Code has been continued. Substantial 
savings were effected in vehicle liability insurance. Now covered are all 
City vehicles except Municipal Railway revenue vehicles and Police, Fire and 
Health emergency vehicles. 

The extension of definite quantity contracts to cover occasional 
recurring Durchases during the fiscal year has been satisfactorily expanded 
to cover many items of equipment used in some quantity by the San Francisco 
Unified School District, 

New term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1 . Sugar 

2 . Steel 

3. Builder's and General Hardware 
km Roller Chain 

5. Coin Tubes 

6. Microscopes, Microscope Apparatus & Related Accessory 
Equipment 

7. Rental of Office Machines 

Large or unusual purchases during the year include the following: 

1. Equipment for new Lowell High School and proposed Central Jr. High, 

2. Specialized equipment for new ward at Laguna Honda Home, 

3. Special car radio dispatching equipment for Police Department, 
new Hall of Justice, 

km Contracts for Consulting Services for Electronic Data Processing 
training program. 

During' the 'fiscal year UO,855 purchase orders were issued in the fetal 
amount of $16,602,171. Detailed analysis is shown in Table No. 1 in the 

Appendix, 



GENERAL 

CHARTER AMENDMENT 

At the June election voters overwhelmingly approved the addition of 
Section 88,2 to the Charter. This section reads as follows: 

PURCHASING PROCEDURE BY ORDINANCE 

"Section 88.2. The board of supervisors shall by ordinance determine 
the monetary limits of purchases of materials, supplies and equipment to be 
made (a) by the taking of informal bids consistent with the manner provided 
in Section 88; and (b) by advertising for bids consistent with the manner 
provided for in Section 95 • 

They shall also provide by ordinance for the monetary limits within 
which procurements of materials, supplies and equipment may be made from 
departmental revolving funds. The purchaser of supplies shall by rules and' 
regulations, approved by the chief administrative officer and the controller, 
establish the methods whereby procurements may be made from departmental 
revolving funds," 

This amendment gives the Board of Supervisors power to set certain 
purchasing limits. It is anticipated that the Board will raise the limits 
under which non-competitive purchases may be made thus eliminating a great 
deal of relatively non-productive work both by the City and our many 
suppliers. Raising of the limit will present a challenge to buying 
personnel to ensure that the City will not pay an unreasonable price for 
articles even though competition may not be required, A new coding system 
to be installed during the 1962-63 fiscal year (as commented on later) will 
be of significant assistance, 

REVOLVING FUNDS 

A recent revision to the Procurement Procedure raised the limits of 
purchases which could be made from departmental cash revolving funds from 
$15> to $25. Previously the Administrative Code had been amended to permit 
this department to make advances, from the Purchaser's revolving fund, to 
those departments not having a cash revolving fund. These actions offer 
possibilities of substantial savings in employees' time in making small 
purchases as the unavoidably time-consuming procedures involved in process- 
ing requisitions and purchase orders are largely done away with, 

STUDIES & IMPROVEMENTS 

Studies 

Much preliminary research was done in preparation for the 
material and supplies coding project to be initiated during the 
1962-63 fiscal year. 

- 9 - 



STUDIES & IMPROVEMENTS - Contd* 



Improvements 



During t&e 1962-63 fiscal year the work of designing and installing a 
a material and supplies code will be commenced and carried forward as far as 
possible. Desirable results will include, but are not limited to, the 
following : 

1. Scientific inventory control 

2. Standardization of materials and supplies 

3. Budget information 

km Desirable ordering quantities 

5>. Information re # surpluses for inter-departmental transfer 

6, Basis for new term contracts. 



Assistant Purchasers Alfred Stettler and Charles A. Wall retired after 
years of conscientious service. It will be difficult to replace them because 
of their knowledge and experience in purchasing hospital supplies and chemicals j 
and construction materials and heating and ventilating equipment, respectively. 
Their personality and sincerity in dealing with fellow employees, City depart- 
ments and commercial firms resulted in better buying and service to departments. 



- 10 - 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 

This Bureau, supervised by a Head Clerk with 25 clerical employees, has 
charge of budgetary and personnel functions, processes bids, purchase orders and 
contracts; checks invoices for payment by Controller, sell charters, codes and 
other documents, and procures official bonds for officers and employees. 

During the fiscal year 30,lt6l "regular" purchase orders totalling 
$16,305,U5U; 10,39U "petty" purchase orders totalling $296,717 were processed. 
See Table No. 1 in the Appendix for details. 

Sales of charters, codes and other documents amounted to $llUi3. 

Discounts earned amounted to $U8,680 or 99.7 percent of the total earnable; 
discounts lost amounted to $l6l or 0.3 percent. This is the largest amount and 
highest percentage earned during any fiscal year, to date. 

Work of the Bureau was handicapped throughout the year due to shortage of 
personnel and also because of the delay in replacement of persons who had retired 
or resigned. Additional clerical help is urgent!/ needed for efficient operation. 

Statistics showing comparison of expenditures with budget allowances and 
comparison of revenues with estimated revenues are shown in Table No. 2 in the 
Appendix, 

STUDIES AND IMPROVEMENTS 



Studies 

Detailed studies were made of office layouts for the proposed move to new 
quarters considering use of new automated equipment, work flow and office manage- 
ment. 

Improvements 

Friden equipment for automation in processing requests for bids and writing 
purchase orders was installed during the year. The necessary revision of forms 
for use with this equipment was made and personnel was trained in the new pro- 
cedures. The system is being extended from month to month to include other 
operations particularly blanket orders and some term bids. It is expected that 
material time savings will be effected when the system is in full operation. 

Bernadine Shumar retired after 13a years of efficient service to the City. 
She will be missed by her many friends. 



- 11 - 



BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 

The Bureau of Equipment and Supplies operates and maintains central warehouse 
and storerooms in various City departments, receives and issues materials, supplies 
and equipment for all departments cf the City and County of San Francisco, and makes 
miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account of the various agencies,, This 
Bureau arranges the sale of and sells surplus and obsolete personal property belong- 
ing to the City, exchanges equipment between departments, maintains a perpetual 
inventory of all materials purchased for the City and County and makes periodic 
checks of such property. The Bureau maintains control of the entire automotive 
fleet, including the listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 

The following locations are staffed and operated by the Division of Sales, 

Inventory and Stores: 

Amount of 

Name and Location Inventory 

Central Warehouse - lf>th & Harrison Stationery $ 11, UU 

Janitorial Supplies 2,098 
2500 cans foodstuffs 
Miscellaneous Furniture 
Central Warehouse Yard - 182+9 Harrison Pipe & Sewer Material 

Department of Public Works - 2323 Army St. 70,789 

Water Department - 639 Bryant Street U39,705 

Hetch Hetchy - Moccasin, California U7,ll8 

San Francisco Airport - South San Francisco 21,092 

Municipal Railway - 2Uth & Utah Sts. 151,822 

- General Stores 159,626 

- Elkton Yard 102)038 

- Potrero 72, 2hh 

- Washington & Mason (Sub-Store) 

(plus 3 Sub-Stores) 27,517 

Health Department - San Francisco Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 2l|8,000 

- Laguna Honda Home, 7th Ave. & Dewey Blvd. 12U,000 

- Hassler Health Home, Redwood City, Cal. 12,200 
Pablic Welfare - Single Mens' Rehabilitation Center, Redwood City 2,U80 
Dept. of Electricity - 261; Golden Gate Avenue 

Recreation and Park l8,5>00 

Sheriff 52,300 

Central Shop Store - Hall of Justice Garage - Sub-Store 37,037 

■s-k- Storage only - Amount included with departmental inventory. 

PERSONNEL 

The Sales, Inventory, and Stores Divisions are staffed by the following 
permanent Civil Service personnel: 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

2 Inventory Clerks 
1 Senior Clerk-Typist 

10 Senior Storekeepers 

25 Storekeepers 

1 Laborer 

li Assistant Storekeepers 



Total U6" 



- 12 - 



SALES DIVISION 

Sixteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority of 
Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research into various 
aspects of different sales, preparing sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, 
opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all money received from 
buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence relative to 
the sales. 

The total revenue from sales was $60,156.10, as follows : 

Waste Paper $ 2,882.32 

Grease and Bones 1,320.89 

Misc. Salvage and Scrap 16,667.38 

Automobiles .and Trucks 17,282.16 

Sand 5,227.30 

Used Office Furniture l,676.i;0 

Fare Boxes I436.8O 

Empty Sacks and Containers 'i;20.07 

Sludge 8,000.00 

Cable Cars 2, 155.00 

Misc. Sales U,OS7.78 

Total He venue from sales $60, 156.10 

The Bureau continued its selling procedure on used automobiles. By "Spot 
Bid Soles", in place of sealed bids, more revenue per car is realized and sales are 
more speedily conducted and expedited. This method was well received by trade 
buyers. There were 120 passenger automobiles and 2I4. trucks sold. 

INVENTORY DIVISION 

The program for this division includes the maintenance of a perpetual 
inventory of the city's equipment, moving and transferring, investigation and 
reporting of missing or stolen property, and transferring of used equipment 
between departments. 

This division was assigned the task of coordinating the move to the new 
Hall of Justice and from City Hall to City Hall Annex, U50 McAllister Street. 
Procedures and manuals were set up for orderly control of moving equipment and 
supplies which included estimates and budget appropriations to cover all contractual 
services dealing with the move. Meetings and conferences were held with depart- 
ment heads concerned to facilitate and expedite the proposed move. These opera- 
tions were completed during the year. 

Office equipment with a $50,000 inventory value was reclaimed or rehabilit- 
ated and relocated in various departments obviating the necessity of buying new 
furniture. 

Through last year and continuing on to the current fiscal year, work with 
the Public Utilities departments in setting up the new coding system for use in 
the Utilities storerooms continued. This coding system will be used in conjunction 
with IBM to facilitate cost accounting and inventory and buying procedures. 

A change in the method of inventorying all city equipment was inaugurated. 
This new procedure, which places certain responsibilities on departments, is expected 
to bring equipment inventory up-to-date. 

- 13 - 



INVENTORY DIVISION - Contd. 

An important responsibility continues to be automobile control. The 
integration of the automobile administration into a central control, with the use 
of the IBM system, is now fully operational. This provides a practical, compre- 
hensive and flexible program in dealing with acquisition, assignment, licensing, 
insurance and disposition of city's entire automobile fleet, valued at $2,000,000, 
and comprising approximately 3*000 vehicles. Automobile insurance coverages were 
extended to cover all city vehicles with the exclusion of emergency vehicles - 
Police, Fire and ambulances, and Municipal Railway revenue vehicles. Insurance 
coverages have been continued at $100/100,000 Bodily Injury Liability and $100,000 
Property Damage Liability, thus affording substantial protection. Strict liaison 
has been maintained between the Central Shops, various departments and Crlifornia 
Department of Motor Vehicles, 

STORES DIVISION 

This division operated 11 major and 13 minor storerooms. 

Changes in personnel and use of temporary employments in the new Assistant 
and Storekeeper classifications have caused problems in stores' operation and 
control. It is expected that these problems will be resolved when permanent 
employments are obtained off of Civil Service lists. 

Operating and control procedures were reviewed for each storeroom and 
improvements made where possible. At some storerooms new type of records geared 
to automation are being established to speed requisition processing and for better 
regulation and control. Uniform records and procedures are desirable where 
possible consistent with the prime purpose of serving the particular department. 

Work continued with departments to reduce stock ■ of obsolete items. 

The Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor continued working with a 
Purchasing Department Committee to establish a new universal coding system, to be 
used by all City departments, so that like items will have the same identifying 
code regardless of department. 

The Procurement Procedure Manual has been distributed to all storekeepers 
in the department. Manuals have been made ty most General Storekeepers on 
operational procedure in their own divisions. 

GENERAL 

The need for more storekeeping personnel at some locations is critical. 
Consideration should be given to obtaining additional storekeepers in the Sheriff's 
Department. At present there is one General Storekeeper, stationed at the City 
Hall, who requisitions and processes, however, actual storekeeping at field loca- 
tions is being performed by two high priced jailers. The need for trained store- 
keepers is acute considering accountability for equipment and foodstuffs at the 
jail at the Hall of Justice and the CcuntyJail in San Bruno. 

Lack of adequate vacation and sick leave replacements has adversely effected 
efficient operations of some storerooms. 

- 11; - 



GENERAL - Continued 

Some Stores Divisions are operating with the new encumbrance requests on 
vendors covering a period of one year or tern of a contract^ however, this is 
gradually being eliminated and a new travelling requisition is replacing it. This 
will speed up the operation to a greater degree than in the past. 

Much favorable publicity has been given the City by the daily press, radio 
and TV, locally and nationally, trade and national magazines, in connection with 
the sales program. 

The staff of the Stores and Equipment division attended several seminars 
and classes, which have greatly added to our knowledge of practical operations of 
the Bureau. The division also had its own In-training program. 

The Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor attended the Governor's 
Safety Seminar, and has already put into practice many suggestions received at that 
meeting. 

This Bureau is working in cooperation with the Mayor's Safety Committee with 
a view towards making our operations safer. One of the Senior Storekeepers serves 
as the Bureau's Safety Officer, attends various local meetings, and checks and 
reviews all accidents and safety methods of the Bureau, and the Storekeeping 
personnel. 

This Eureau proposes to have three of its personnel attend EDP sessions 
being conducted under the auspices of the Civil Service Commission to obtain a 
better knowledge of Electronic Data Processing, and its application to the pro- 
posed overall coding operations being planned for city-wide use, 

STUDIES AND IMPROVEMENTS 
Studies 

Studies on application of modern material handling equipment to stores ' 
operation, continued. Budget requests were made for the equipment determined 
desirable. 

The physical structure and layout of storerooms were reviewed and 
recommendations made to departments for improvements. 

Improvements 

1. Central Warehouse - All loading doors repaired and heater installed. 

2iN. Water Department Storeroom - Stairs and mezzanine floor repaired. 

Safe -gasoline storage provided. 
3, Recreation and Park Warehouse - Additional shelving added 

Additional lighting installed 

Ventilation provided in storerooms for insecticides and grain, 

U. Central Shop Xifareh^use 

Some new metal bins replacing wooden installed. 



- 1$ - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 



For all city departments, except Public Utilities, Purchaser's Shops located 
throughout the city, maintain 1619 motorized units and mechanical installations in 
school buildings, sewage plants, pumping stations, public buildings, etc. 

Administration and major repair facilities are at the Central Shops, 
800 Quint Street. Other installations are: Gclden Gate Park Shop, providing 
maintenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; new Hall of Justice 
Service Station where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police and other city 
cars, and inspection and light maintenance for Police vehicles; Dept. of Public 
Works' Army Street Yard and 19th Avenue Station; Health Dept. Garage; and Depart- 
ment of Electricity Yard. 

The Central Shops have four main maintenance shop areas: 1. Automobile, 
2. Truck, 3. Fire Apparatus, km Machine and the following auxiliary shops: 
Blacksmith, Pattern, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body & Fender, Tire, and Service 
Station. 

One additional employment was added to the Bureau due to the opening of the 
new Hall of Justice Garage and Service Station and five additional employments were 
effected by transfer of personnel from the Police Department budget. There are 
9U budgeted employments as f ollows : 

1 General Superintendent 

1 Automotive Machinist General Foreman 

2 Automotive Machinist Foremen 

U Automotive Machinist Sub-Foremen 

1 Maintenance Machinist Foreman 
8 Maintenance Machinist 

28 Automotive Machinist 

3 Automotive Mechanic 
28 Garagemen 

2 Pattern Maker 

3 Car and Auto Painter 
3 Body & Fender Workers 
3 Blacksmith 

2 Blacksmith Finisher 

1 Leatherwcrker 

1 Chauffeur 

1 Senior Account Clerk 

1 Accountant 

1 Account Clerk 

In addition, 1 General Storekeeper and 1 Storekeeper are assigned to the 
Central Shops to procure, store and issue stock and supplies. 

Richard Johnstone, Automotive Machinist Foreman, retired after 292 years 
of city service. The efficient operation of the Fire Shop was, in a large 
measure, due to his leadership and untiring efforts. 

Fred G. Daulton, Auto Machinist, Clair Madigan, Auto Machinist, John R. 
McNeill, Machinist, Daniel J. Leahy, Accountant and Alfred L. Gergus, Auto Machinist, 
all gave the city many years of faithful service in their respective positions and 
they will be greatly missed and hard to replace, 

- 16 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Automobile Shop 

The automobile shop is responsible for the maintenance and repair of £08 
city owned and operated passenger cars. There were $0 new Police cars 
processed for service by installing sirens, red lights, gun racks, extra batteries, 
etc. In addition, cars were prepared for service for the Fire, Health, Sheriff 
and other various city departments. 

The shop is gradually being equipped with the latest tools and devices to 
permit vehicle repair with minimum down time. 

The shop completed 2311 jobs during the fiscal year of which the following 
nrplea : 



arc samples : 



202 Transmission overhauls (standard) 

22 Transmission overhauls (automatic) 
28U Clutch jobs 
302 Brake reline jobs 

28 Motor overhauls 
190 Accident repairs 
107 Radiator repairs 

h-S Differentials overhauled 

72 Front system alignments 



Truck Shop 



The Truck Shop completed 3260 jobs. This included work for all depart- 
ments on various size trucks, tractors, eductors, street sweepers, asphalt 
spreaders, bucket loaders, back hoes, sewer cleaners, traffic paint trucks, etc. 
Complete overhaul jobs to minor maintenance and repairs are also performed in this 
shop. 

Unusual major jobs included: redesign and manufacture of extensions to 
increase efficiency of Blaw-Knox asphalt spreader; design and manufacture truck 
boom assembly for faster and safer sewer repairs ; and design and modify street 
paint striping machine so that three lines and three colors might be painted 
simultaneously. 

One Auto Machinist was assigned to the DPW yard to make minor repairs and 
adjustments to DPW trucks and equipment to eliminate down time of units and crews 
in the field. 

Fire Shop 

The Fire Shop section of the Central Shops maintained a total of 231 
pieces of Fire Department equipment; completed °U8 jobs; and answered 1790 service 
calls by the field maintenance man for rinor repairs to fire equipment in the 
fire houses - an increase of $1 jobs from 1960-61, 

The conversion program converted three Seagrave pumpers to triple combina- 
tion - with a fourth near completion; a rescue squad truck to a service squad 
truck (and completely equipped); a water wagon to a high pressure battery wagon, 

- 17 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

Fire Shc p - Contd. 

Two new American LaFrance triple combinations were equipped, tested and 
put into service and one new high pressure truck was equipped with a new high 
pressure valve operating machine. 

The following major maintenance and repair jobs (with numerous minor 
repairs) were accomplished: 

8 engines removed and completely overhauled 
U2 engines repaired, valve grinds, headgaskets and bearing adjustments 
hit fire pumps overhauled and repaired 
65 brake jobs completed 
17 differentials overhauled 

22 transmissions removed, overhauled and installed 
hi clutches repaired and installed 
22 radiators removed, repaired and replaced 
U8 electrical wiring repairs 

37 carburetors removed, overhauled and replaced 
71 engine tune-ups 

lit pieces of apparatus equipped with turn signals 
13 sets of safety brakes installed 

With the Fire Department's more rigid safety program apparatus is being 
inspected, modified and changed to eliminate operational hazards to fire fighting 
personnel. This program has increased the cost of Shop operation somex.'hat. 

The grease and inspection program initiated during the l?60-6l fiscal year, 
whereby fire apparatus can be driven regularly to the shops for immediate 
necessary grease jobs and miner repairs, eliminating possible major repair problems, 
is doing an excellent job. There were iSh pieces of fire apparatus greased and 
8 aerial hydraulic systems changed and flushed. A number of minor defects were 
noted and repaired eliminating costly future repairs. 

Machine Shcp 

This shop located in the Central Shops provides mechanical repair and 
maintenance service to various city departments including the School District. 

The employments consist of 1 Maintenance Machinist Foreman, 3 Maintenance 
Machinists (at the Central Shops), 2 field Maintenance Machinists, and 1 Mainten- 
ance Machinist each at the Southeast, North Point and Richmond-Sunset Sex^age 
Treatment Plants, 

In addition to the general maintenance and repairs performed at the sewage 
treatment plants a total of 10hl work orders were completed at this shop. 

The following major maintenance and repair jobs were accomplished: 

1, Modernized 3 single purpose fire pumping engines to triple combination 
units - with a fourth near completion. 

- 18 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Machine Shop - Contd. 

2, Redesigned and reconstructed Ahrens-Fox aerial ladder (no longer in 
production) complete operation and tooling by Central Shops. 

3. Completed repair and overhauled Water Tower #1 hydraulic machinery and 
tower structure after extensive damage due to collision. 

li. Overhauled turbine section and pump of multi-stage steam turbine pump #2 

at Fire Dept. Pumping Station #2. 
5o Overhauled and replaced "hot well" lines of boiler feed lumps at Fire 

Dept. Pump Station #1. 

6. Designed, constructed and installed jet type sand eductor for Yosemite 
Sewage Pumping Station. 

7. Overhauled main pumps at Lakeshore Sewage Pumping Station and Vicente 
Pumping Station. 

8. Reconstructed flap gates on 6 influent channels and renewed bar rake 
assemblies and sludge pumps at North Point Sewage Plant. 

9. Overhauled main lift pumps, vacuum pumps and grit washers at Southeast 
Sewage Plant. 

10. Repaired grit pumps, sludge pumps effluent gates, bar rakes and skimmer 
flights and complete reconstruction of sandwasher #2 at Richmond Sunset 
Plant, 

11. Overhauled brine pumps and compressors at Steinhart Aquarium. 

12 j Repaired 25 h.p. motor and air turbines on organ for Legion of Honor. 

13 j Repaired boiler room, sewage plant and water supply pumps, County Jail#2. 
lit. Overhauled drainage and San Andreas pumps at Sharps Park Basin -Rec.& Pk. 

15. Reconstructed main heating blowers in Gen. Adminis, Office Bldg.- SFUSD. 

16, Designed, developed and constructed 70 foot vertical rolling, portable 
water tower and booster pump for elimination of bird nuisances in school 
buildings, etc. 

17 » Reconstructed surplus machine tools and equipment for installation at 
new Woodrow Wilson High School Shops. 

Among other accomplishments and functions of the Machine Shop were: 
conducting and completion of Driver Training Program for all Shop divisions j the 
coordination and application of a Shop Safety Program including eye protection 
for employees; and numerous improvements and installations of parts and equipment 
for more efficient maintenance and repair work. 

Golden Gate Park Shop 

This shop, with 1 Automotive Machinist Foreman, 3 Automotive Machinists and 
1 Garagemen, is responsible for the inspection, maintenance and repair of all 
Recreation & Park Dept. equipment xtfhich includes 21 passenger cars, U8 trucks, 
20 tractors, 113 power mowers, 50 hand mowers and h7 miscellaneous pieces. During 
the past year the shop performed 698 automotive and It35> mower repair jobs. 

It is gratifying to report that this shop has cut expenses - saving the City 
as much as 75 percent - for parts expenditures by re-manufacturing or adapting 
standard parts to much of the specialized equipment. 



- 1? - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

Hall of Justice Service Station 

This new facility was opened in August, 1961 replacing the old Hall of 
Justice Garage, Police Motorcycle Service at old Southern Station, and the 15th 
k Harrison Sts. Station. 

Service is provided 7 days a week, 16 hours per day, to 212 passenger cars 
and trucks and 169 motorcycles. 

An average of 30,000 gallons of gasoline and 600 quarts of motor oil are 
dispensed monthly to Police and other city vehicles. Presently, the station is not 
being used to its full capacity in this regard as many other city department's 
vehicles could be fueled here instead of using credit cards at private stations. 

The following major functions were performed: 976 tow jobs; changed and 
repaired 3270 tires; II4.96 batteries; over 2000 mechanical repairs and adjustments 
made on Police vehicles, 

A program of inspection, grease and oil change for Police cars was initiated 
at the new station. Fifty new (replacement) cars received in January, 196l are 
now being serviced exclusively at the station, as x^ill be the 97 new replacement 
vehicles to be delivered in the fall of 1962, This program will require one 
additional Automotive Serviceman employment allowing the present automotive service 
contract with a private company to be materially reduced - a saving offsetting the 
required additional employee. It is anticipated this program will result in less 
down time and more "in service" usage of Police cars. 

Pattern Shop 

The pattern makers completed 169 major jobs, made hJ> patterns, rebuilt 8 Fire 
Dept. ladders, manufactured 8 new 35 foot extention ladders, repaired 50 various 
types of Fire Dent, ladders, inspected and tested 25 ladders, made holders, brackets 
and partitions necessary to equip 2 new triple combinations and h converted triple 
combinations, 1 hose tender and 1 service squad, designed a new ladder lock which 
will be used on all extention ladders in the future, repaired office furniture, 
made hose and battery boxes, and other equipment necessary to equip new and old 
apparatus. 

Hose Shop 

This shop was responsible for the distribution and rotation of lUjOOO feet 
of fire hose to various fire units. Repairs were made to 6500 feet of various 
size hose and suctions including sewer and street cleaning hose with 137 lengths 
of useable hose being salvaged from fire surplus for use in the Sewer and Street 
Cleaning Department. 

Blacksmith Shop 

This shop is staffed with 3 Blacksmiths and 2 Blacksmith Finishers. The 
work consists of a wide variety of metal work, fabricating, tool making and welding. 

The shop completed 150 jobs on fire apparatus such as parts required for the 
Fire Apparatus Conversion program; outfitting, repairing and altering equipment 
necessary on fire apparatus; major welding jobs on high pressure system equipment, 

- 20 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

Blacksmith Shop - Contd. 

sewage plants and pumping stations ; repaired 52 Street Cleaning buggies, 3of>l tools 
and chisels for DFW, voting machines, coin boxes for Tax Collector, etc.; rebuilt 
2000 gutter broom sections for street sweepers; and manufactured surveying tools. 

Improvements in the operation and layout of this shop have increased the 
efficiency and convenience of the flow of work. 

Tire Shop 

This shop inspects tires on cars, trucks and fire apparatus and replaces 
with new or recapped tires as required. This involved 136l passenger car tires 
and 2637 truck tires. Road calls were made as required. 

Body and Fender Shop 

This shop is staffed with 3 Body & Fender workers who repair damaged auto 
and truck bodies; manufacture sheet metal parts and devices; modify and/or convert 
existing equipment; and repairs radiators. 

During the past year a total of 397 radiators were repaired. This saved 
the time of a shop employee delivering and picking up radiators from a contractor 
and also realized a saving of approximately $3900 in the contractual service 
account. 

Of the 255 city vehicle accidents, 161 -.rere repaired at the Central Shops 
and 9h by outside contractors. Over $9600 was expended on the outside contractual 
services. It is recommended by Central Shops and the Blyth-Zellerbach Committee 
that all accident repairs be done by shop personnel. This would require one 
additional Body & Fender Worker which would be offset by the savings accrued. 

Leather Shop (Upholstery) 

The leather worker completed 328 jobs: straps, covers, belts, seats, smoke 
tubes, Stoke stretcher covers, safety belts, hose covers and numerous other equip- 
ment necessary to the Fire Department and for stock. 

This shop is not being utilized to its full capabilities of its facilities. 
It is staffed with but one man who is unable to keep up with the required work 
making it necessary to contract over $i±000 this fiscal year. With one additional 
upholsterer the work capacity would be increased and all required jobs could be 
accomplished with a minimum of back log and delay. 

Paint Shop 

The Paint Shop completed 110 major jobs; painted 7 DFW trucks, 2 Fire Dept, 
tractors, 1 tractor-trailer, completely refinished an 80 foot aerial ladder, 
refinished h$ ladders and finished 8 new ladders, paint work on numerous vehicle 
accident jobs for city departments, refinished all office furniture repaired in 
Pattern Shop, and painted all equipment necessary to equip new cars and trucks, 

- 21 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

Paint Shop - Contd. 

City seals, Police and Fire Department seals and decals, special numbers 
and letters, etc. were applied to all new and repainted city vehicles, and 35>0 
silk screen decals were made, installed and varnished for new Police cars. 

There is insufficient man power in the Paint Shop in that the demand and 
need for service far exceeds the limited staff. There are presently three 
painters where h and 5 were available in the past. One additional painter 
requested in the past two year's budgets was denied. A request will be made again 
in the 1963-61; budget. 



STUDIES AND IMPROVEMENTS 



Studies 



1. Studies on bureau organization to provide maximum service with existing 
or expanded personnel continued, 

2. A joint study by Shop Superintendent and Police personnel of motorcycle 
repair by city forces, based on Los Angeles Police Dept. experience, 
indicated no material saving over the present method of private contract, 

3. Studies of centralized rather than departmental control of automotive 
vehicles indicated better use, less down time, and reduced costs under 
central control. 

Improvements 

1. Shades were provided for shops on the west and south windows to reduce 
heat and glare, 

2. The improved accounting system, installed July 1, 1961, provided 
quarterly reports to departments on job expenditures by job number 
sequence; by vehicle or equipment number and, in. addition, separate 
accident charges. By order of the Chief Administrative Officer, the 
departments under his jurisdiction were required to review these reports 
with particular reference to those vehicles requiring excessive repair, 
down time and where replacement is indicated. 

3. Five loan cars were made available to departments during repair where 
operations could not be delayed and department had no reserve vehicle. 

Certain alterations and improvements to Central Shops are necessary. The 
following, requested but not allowed in the 1961-62 and 1962-63 Capital Improvement 
Program, will be recommended in I963-6I4.: 

1. Installation of heavy rather than light duty hoist for lifting fire 
trucks, dump trucks, and other heavy duty rigs, 

2. Installation of doors of a size to drive trucks into maintenance and 
storeroom areas. This applies to 8 locations, 

3. Installation of a 15>00 square foot mezzanine storage area in the west 
storeroom, 

- 22 - 



TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau provides centralized service, available 
to all City and County departments in machine accounting (IBM), blueprinting, photo- 
graphy, photostating, and mimeograph and offset printing. 

Presently, the Bureau occupies h locations: 2 machine accounting units - 
City Hall and Hall of Justice j 2 reproduction units in the City Hall - blueprinting 
on the 5th floor and all other reproduction services in the basement. The machine 
accounting unit in the Hall of Justice was opened this fiscal year to provide 
service for city departments located there. Funds have been appropriated for 
1962-63 fiscal year and plans are being drawn by the Bureau of Architecture, Dept. 
of Public Works, to relocate the blueprinting section adjoining other bureau 
facilities. The consolidation of all reproduction activities in one location will 
improve operation efficiency and result in better service. 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau is administered by a Supervisor of 
Tabulating and Reproduction with the assistance of a Supervisor of Tabulating. 
Funds for operating expenses are provided by budget transfers and work orders from 
city departments'. The total cost for work processed during the fiscal year 1 961-62 
amounted to $217,671;. 

TABULATING SECTION 
Room 158, City Hall Room 125, Hall of Justice 

Personnel: 



1 Supervisor of Tabulating 

1 Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 

3 Tabulating Machine Operators 

1 Key Punch Operator 

2 Key Punch Machines 
2 Sorting Machines 
1 Collator 
1 Interpreter 

1 Reproducer-S-ummary Punch 

2 Accounting Machines 



1 Principal Tabulating Machine Operator 
3 Tabulating Machine Operators 
5 Key Punch Operators 



Equipment i 

7 
2 
2 

1 
2 
2 



Key Punch Machines 
Sorting Machines 
Collators 
Interpreter 
Reproducers 
Accounting Machines 



Major rtecurring Functions of the Tabulating Section; 



Department 
Municipal Court 



Civil Service Commission 



Function 

Traffic Citations: 

Calendars, Notices, Warrants, Adjudication 
Statistics, Abstracts, Paid and Unpaid License 
License File, Paid and Unpaid Name File, and 
Miscellaneous Records and Reports 
* Index of Section 152, Municipal Police Code 

Salary Standardization Reports 
Salary Survey Data Analysis 
Recruitment and Examination Records 



* New function inaugurated this fiscal year. 

- 23 - 



TABULATION AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU - Continued 
Tabulating Section Contd. 

Department Function 



Controller 



Tax Collector 

Registrar of Voters 
Dept. of Public Health 



Purchasing Department 



Public Utilities 

Bureau Heat, Light & Power 



Budget Statistics 

Tabulation of Officials' Bonds 

Cancelled Warrant Report 

Summary of Unpaid Property Taxes 

Daily Encumbrance Posting Reports (Purchase Orders) 

* EDP Program Punching 

License Tax Accounting: 

Hotels, Apartment Houses, Food Inspection, 
Pin Ball Machines, etc, 
•>"- Hotel Transient Tax 

Election Officer Payroll 
Election Analysis and Statistics 

Birth and Death Indexes and Statistics 

Cost Accounting-Central Office and San Francisco 

General Hospital 
T.B. Patient Subsidy Reports 
Emergency Hospital Statistics 

* Public Health Field Nursing 
•* X-Ray Statistics 

* Ward Census Summary 
Budget Statistics 

Inventories -Equipment and Warehouse 
Stores Stationery Control 
Record of Average Use (materials) 
Fee Tag Reports 
Purchase Order Registers 
Shop Expenditure Reports 

* Vehicle Maintenance Cost Accounting 
Contracts and other Statistics 

Distribution & Accounting Records of Consumption of 
Gas & Electricity by City & County Departments 



New functions inaugurated this fiscal year. Index l£2 M.P.C. is the first 
step in the establishment of an index of all Complaints. The Bureau is 
cooperating xvith the Electronic Data Processing (EDP) program and will be 
punching many thousands of IBM card records for future electronic computer 
applications. 

Addition of the Hotel Transient Tax and changes made in the SF Municipal 
Code have increased the number of license tax accounts, processed for the 
Tax Collector from 17,597 to 20,252. 

The Department of Public Health has expanded its use of IBM machine accounting 
to include Field Nursing and Ward Census reports and plans further expansion 
in the 1962-63 fiscal year. New machine accounting applications are discussed 
later in this report under the heading of "Studies and Improvements". 



- 2U- 



REPRODUCTION SECTION - 2 Locations, Room gO Basement and 5th Floor 

Personnel : * 1 Supervisor of Central Services 
1 Photographer 
1 Photographer, as needed 
1 Photostat Operator 
1 Photostat Operator, part time 

1 Sr. Blueprinting Machine Operator 

2 Blueprinting Machine Operators 
2 Offset Machine Operators 

1 Account Clerk 

Equipment : 1 Blueprint Machine 

2 Ammonia Process Machines (dry process) 

1 Photostat Machine 

2 Microfilm Cameras 

2 Mimeograph Machines 

1 Offset Duplicating Machine 

Cameras, Enlargers, Printers, etc. 

* Also acts in the capacity of Supervisor of Reproduction. 
Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Section; , 
Department Function 

All Departments Departmental Budget Estimates 

Various Depts. (20) Annual Reports 

Assessor Real Property Transfer Records 

City Attorney Opinions and other Legal Papers 

Board of Supervisors Calendars and Ordinances 

Purchasing Bids, Specifications and Purchasing Records 

Treasurer Microfilm Record of Checks Deposited 

Recreation and Park Specifications for Construction, Maintenance, and Repair 

of Buildings, Parks, and Recreation Facilities 

SF Unified School Dist. Annual Budget 

Public Works, Engr., Contract Sets of Blueprints for Construction, Maintenance, 
Bur. of Arch., Rec. & & Repair of Public Buildings, Streets, Sewers, and 
Park, SF Unified Sc.D. Recreational Facilities 

Public Works, City At ty<> Photography in connection with Construction Progress, 
SF Unified School Dist, Earth Slides, Accidents, Redevelopment and Planning 

Assessor, Public Works, Blueprinting of Block Maps of the City and County 
Real Estate, Recorder, 
Tax Collector & Purch. 

While the above recurring functions do not change in descriptive title from 
year to year, the methods and procedures are continually being revised to improve 
service and reduce cost, for example: 

The procedure for the preparation of Departmental Budget Estimates was revised, 
during the fiscal year thereby making it possible to effect a saving of over 
$2500 in the annual cost of budget reproduction. 

- 25 - 



TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU - Continued 

In prior years the printing of the SF Unified School District budget was done 
in the Reproduction Bureau and the assembly, checking, binding, etc. was done 
by the clerical staff of the School District. This year all of the work 
entailed was done in the Reproduction Bureau, and bound sets were delivered 
ready for distribution. 

In the field of photography the Bureau acquired a Polaroid camera for the use 
of all departments and this new service has been very well accepted. It is 
now possible for representatives of Public Works, Real Estate and other 
departments to take their own preliminary pictures thereby saving considerable 
photographic expense. 

STUDIES AMD IMPROVEMENTS 



Studies 

One of the important continuing functions of the Bureau is to study new and 
improvedprocedures of data processing and reproduction to provide better service to 
the departments. 

With the cooperation of the Department of Public Health studies are being 
made concerning Sanitation Inspection accounting and Medical Record statistics with 
a view to conversion of these operations to a system of electronic data processing. 

Adaption of an IBM machine accounting system for processing Annual Permit 
Renewals (gas stations, garages, welding and paint spray plants, public meeting 
places, etc.) for the Fire Dept. has been under study for some time. Development of 
final procedures has been delayed pending revisions in the Code. 

Studies have been completed for conversion of the Recorder's Grantor and 
Grantee Indexes from manual indexing to EDP, effective January 1, 1963. It is hoped 
that appropriation of funds will be made in time to meet this deadline as the index 
is kept on a calendar year basis and delay would result in a dual method of indexing 
within one year or postponement until January 1, 1°6U. 

In cooperation with the ED? Development Program a study is now being made of 
the present system of producing Block Map Books with a view to effecting a consider- 
able reduction in the cost of printing and providing an updated record of property 
ownership. 

Improvements 

As part of a continuing program of replacement and modernization 1 new and 
up-to-date blueprinting equipment was installed and one mimeograph machine replaced 
from funds appropriated in the 1961-62 budget. 

The 1962-63 budget provides for replacement of an offset duplicator with a 
new and improved model which will make possible the expansion of the work program 
in this field. Replacement of the other mimeograph machine purchased in 19U5 is 
also included. 

Additional improvements planned for 1962-63 fiscal year include : the 
acquisition of a paper shredder to be used by Civil Service, Finance and Records, ~£hd 
other departments for destruction of confidential papers that, under Air Pollution 
regulations, may no longer be burned j a Xerox Copier to be installed for use by all 
departments. A survey of departmental need for this type of equipment was made xrith 
the result that several departments were considering one of these machines but did not 
have sufficient work to justify full-time rental. Central usage will realize ■ 
considerable saving to the City. „ 26 - 



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TABLE NO. 1 










Showing 










Purchase Order Pro 


cessing 






1961-62 




1960-61 






Purchase 
Orders 


Amount 


Purchase 
Orders 


Amount 


General 


17,2^3 


§ 7,la3,237 


17,386 


$ 7,137,858 


Education 


5,955 


3,086,905 


5,733 


2,881,720 


Health 


h,588 


2,U2h,5i6 


li,568 


2,211,501 


Utilities 


2,675 


3,380,796 


5,U03 


3,129,338 


Petty P.O.s 
(Not exceeding 

$5o) 


10.39U 


296,717 


11,223 


302,065 




Uo,855 


$16,602,171 


Wt,313 


$15,962,U82 



TABLE NO* 2 

EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of Expenditures with Original Budget for all Operating 
Appropriations Except Personal Services for l°6l-l Q 62 : 



Account 


Budgeted 


Contractual Services 


$31,796 


1.311.200.000 




Materials & Supplies 


13,000 


1.311.300.000 




Equipment 


5,990 


1.311.U00.311 




Premium - Official Bonds 


7,990 


1.311.812.311 




Premium - Auto Insurance 


37,155 


1.311.813.311 




Membership Dues 


82U 


1.311.85U.OOO 





Expended 


Surplus 


Deficit 


$28,819 


* $2,977 




13,550 




** $ 550 


U,83U 


1,156 




8,632 




*-** 6U2 


Uo,358 




**## 3,203 


813 


11 





Total $96,7^ $97,006 $k,lkk $ii,395 







RENENUES 






Comparison 


of revenues with 


estimated 


revenues 1961-62 






Estimated 




Actual 


Over 


Under 


Account 


Revenue 




Revenue 


Estimated 


Estimated 


Sale of Documents 


$ 8U3 




$ 1,UU3 




$ 600 


7061 












Minor Sales 


U,225 




7,U05 




3,180 


7062 












Miscellaneous Sales 


1,015 






$1,015 




106h 












Sale of Sludge 


3,238 




8,000 




h,762 


7U51 












Sale of Grease 


692 




1,708 




1,016 


7621 













Total $10,013 $18,556 $1,015 ^9,558 

* ^2925 transferred to other appropriations. 
*# $1500 transferred to this annropriation. 
■a#* $1912 charged to other departments for Fidelity Blanket Bond. 
*•?:-** $3620 Supplemental appropriation for additional city owned automobiles. 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT 
Fiscal Year 1962-1963 



September, 1963 



City and County of San Francisco 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 CITY HALL 
ZONE 2 

September 5, 1963 

Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1962-63 

Mr. Sherman P, Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Duckel: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 1963 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

As stated in detail in the report the department expended $l6,828,li;3 by 
3li,ll6 purchase orders and by encumbrance requests , maintained 25 storerooms, 
sold $61;,058 surplus city property in 13 sales, did 7389 shop jobs amounting 
to $908,659, and expended $229,238 on reproduction and tabulating. 
Purchasing was conducted for all city departments, shop operations for 5U 
departments and reproduction and tabulating for 55 departments. 

Every effort is being made by all bureaus to give departments faster and 
better service. 

Purchasing under the revised limits set by the ordinance effective January 9, 
1963 as a result of the Charter Amendment aporoved by the voters in the 
June 1962 election has resulted in more rapid and efficient purchasing. 
The extended use of traveling requisitions has simplified and speeded 
procurement. 

Improved stores procedures has resulted in better stores 1 operation and 
reduction in inventories. 

Service at the Hall of Justice Service Station is continually expanding. 
Central Shops service is improving as new modern equipment is being 
procured on a planned schedule. 

More varied duplicating and reproduction services are being performed with 
new equipment. Central Tabulating services are being expanded and 
coordinated with EDP program. 

New main offices on the second floor of the City Hall, properly laid out 
for work flow and control were occupied on April 1, 1963. This has 
resulted in increased morale and efficiency. 

The problems associated with operating with temporary helo were of concern 
particularly at shops and in stores. 



- 2 - 
Mr. Sherman P. Duckel September 5, 1963 

Chief Administrative Officer 

The following statements on the activities of the department for past fiscal 
year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, dated 
July 26, 1963. 

1. Improvements are being made to the Purchaser's Shops under appropri- 
ated capital improvement funds, 

2. Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated in 
the annual report include : 

(a) Establish specification and control system for buying on a full 
time basis. 

(b) Establish operating coding system for all materials, supplies 
and equipment, etc. 

(c) Establish better control for stores by use of standard coding 
and automated records. 

(d) Establish definite policies on motorized equipment replacement 
and control. 

(e) Expand services of Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau to serve 
other city departments. 

3. The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other than 
those for personal services with original budget appropriations 
for 1962-196 3 is given in the appendix, annual report. Funds for 
departments' activities are obtained mainly by transfers from budget 
appropriations of other departments, 

lu The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget of 
1962-63 is given in the apoendix, annual report. 

3>. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive and 

other equipment services, and for tabulating and reproduction, should 
be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in work required, 
and for steadily increasing labor and material costs, 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual report. 

In this, my final annual report, I wish to take this opportunity to express 
my most sincere appreciation for your cooperation and assistance, to the 
various city departments and to: T. F. Conway, Buying and assistant depart- 
ment head, J. Brackett, Accounting, A. M. Flaherty, Shops, J. E. Leary, Stores, 
G. A. Stanley, Tabulating and Reproduction, my Secretary Hazel Shiman, and to 
the employees of the Purchasing Department for their cooperation and loyalty 
without which the department could not function as efficiently and as 
effectively. 

Very truly yours, 



BEN BENAS 

Purchaser of Supplies 



September, 1963 
ANNUAL REPORT 

PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and contractual 
services for all departments for the City and County, including city-owned 
utilities, and the San Francisco Unified School District] repairs and maintains 
automotive and other equipment for the various departments, except Public 
Utilities, and for the School District as requested; operates a central tabulating 
and reproduction bureau for departments requiring its services; transfers to 
other departments for use or sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any 
department of the city; maintains a perpetual inventory of equipment in the 
various departments; and operates central stores of the Purchasing and various 
other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the Shops 
on equipment and mechanical problems and by the Bureau of Buying on new products, 
specifications and prices,, 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 205 permanent in five bureaus plus U temporary for 
developing a standard code. The Organization Chart is shown in the Appendix. 

Supervisory - June 30? 1963 

Administrative 

B. Benas - Purchaser of Supplies 
H. Shiiaan - Secretary 

Bureaus 

Buying 

T. F. Conway - Assistant Director Purchasing and Services - 

Bureau Head and Assistant Department Head 
J. C. Gavin - Senior Purchaser 
H. R. Stevins - Coding Supervisor 

Equipment and Supplies 

J. E. Leary - Stores and Equipment Supervisor - Bureau Head 

H. R. Stevens - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor (To October 1962) 

J. H. Beck - Acting Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

Personnel and Accounts 

J. Brackett - Head Clerk - Bureau Head 
M. Wehrle - Principal Clerk 

- 1 - 



Bureaus - Continued 



Shops 



A. M. Flaherty - City Shops General Superintendent - Bureau Head 

J. Fischer - Automotive Machinist General Foreman (To Feb. 1963) 

B. Shain - City Shops Assistant Superintendent (Temporary appointment) 

From June 1963 

Tabulating and Reproduction 

G. A. Stanley - Central Services Supervisor - Bureau Head 

J, W. Bender - Supervisor of Tabulating (Temporary assignment to EDP Staff) 

H. Egliht - Acting Supervisor of Tabulating 

The valued services of the following were separated from city employment 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment : 



Name 


Position 




Approx. Years 
City Service 


Date 


Retired 












Arthur R. Winkler 
Frank S. Fickett 
Laurence Casement 
Jacob Fischer 

Clyde R. Walker 
Harry Zandt 


Purchaser 
Purchaser 
Machinist 
Automotive Machinist 

Foreman 
Blacksmith Finisher 
Automotive Machinist 

Sub-Foreman 


General 




2li 

8 
3U 
35* 

13 


9-U-62 
9-1-62 
1-1-63 
2-1-63 

2-1-63 
7-1-63 


Died 












Vincent Haderle 

George F. Schrimp 


Storekeeper 
Storekeeper 

Work Accompl 


ished 




5 
31* 


9-1-62 
1-9-63 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail under the 
separate bureaus, remained substantially the same as in 1961-62. Major accomplish- 
ments are indicated in the following table: 



Bureau 



Unit 



1961-1962 



1962-1963 



Buying 


Purchase Orders 
Amount 


UO,855 
$16,602,171 


3U,ll6 
$16,828,1113 


Equipment & Supplies 


Number of Sales 

Sales Amount 

Major Stores Operated 


$ 


16 

60,156 

11 


$ 


13 

6U,058 
11 


Shops 


Job Orders 
Expenditures 


$ 


7,519 
866, 21U 


$ 


7,389 
908,659 


Tabulating 
Reproduction 


Expenditures 
Expenditures 


$ 
$ 


116,762 
100,912 


$ 
$ 


126,520 
102,718 



- 2 - 



GENERAL COMMENTS 

The past year saw material changes in facilities, procedures and methods for 
the various department activities. 

On April 1, 1963, the main administrative Buying and Personnel and Account 
Bureau offices moved to new quarters on the second floor of the City Hall, increasing 
the area from approximately 1±000 to 6000 square feet. Provision was made for 
separate partitioned cubicles for each Purchaser, public counter of adequate size, 
separate bid preparation and purchase order processing facilities, separate walled 
area for noisy equipment, library and work areas, employees' locker and lunchroom, 
and separate administrative offices. Employee morale and xrork accomplishment has 
materially increased since the move. 

Purchasing under the revised limits since April 1963, set by ordinance as a 
result of the charter amendment voted in June 1962, has been more rapid and efficient 
and resulted in better service to departments. 

The expanded use of travelling requisitions has reduced paper work by 
eliminating repetitive typing and processing. 

Continued increase in products and services under terra contracts has been of 
material benefit to the Purchasing and using departments. 

Work continued on developing a standard coding system under supplemental 
funds. Forbes and Company consultants with Mr. Stevens, Coding Supervisor, 
developed a basic code designation, coordinated their work with the Controller and 
using departments and identified 80,000 different items. These items were separated 
into groups by classes corresponding to the Federal Code. It is expected that the 
code and master item file will be completed by July 1965. 

The Controller worked closely with the Purchaser on joint regulations for 
handling revolving fund purchases, setting rules for informal and proprietary 
procurement and processing purchase orders. His cooperation and assistance is 
appreciated. 

The specification and control section formed for studies which cannot be done 
by buyers without impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis because 
of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time is clearly 
apparent in view of rapid technological advances in processes, equipment, and 
materials and supplies. 

Use of Friden Flexowriters for bids, automated purchase order writing and 
blanket orders continued. New functions are continually being performed. This 
method has been found to be of immeasurable value because original source d ata can 
be reused from tapes. 

Storekeeping records and control were materially improved because of more 
direct supervision, improved methods, and departmental cooperation. The bureau, 
however, has been handicapped because of lack of personnel and the extended use of 
temporary employments. 

- 3 - 



A new method of inventory control was initiated under which department heads 
are responsible for marking and controlling items charged to them instead of by the 
inventory division of the Stores and Equipment Bureau. When the present records 
are brought up-to-date it is expected that it will be possible to more easily main- 
tain records current. 

Training of storekeepers on improved methods and application to EDP continued. 
Every effort was made to reduce inventories to the minimum consistent with the time 
required to obtain delivery. It is expected that the new Department of Electricity 
and Water Department storerooms will improve their operation and control. 

The Stores and Equipment Bureau was responsible for moving the Department of 
Electricity to new quarters in the Islais Creek area and the Purchasing Department 
to nextf offices in the City Hall. These moves were made with the minimum of 
confusion and xd-thout undue delay so that the departments could continue functioning 
without interruption* 

The Central Shops at 800 Quint Street continued to function with increased 
efficiency as indicated by better condition of city vehicles. Some obsolete equip- 
ment was replaced, and other units are scheduled for replacement as funds are made 
available. The Shops reconverted Fire Department obsolete motorized equipment to 
modern needed units at material savings. However, to accomplish this, it was 
necessary, based on Fire Department priorities, to delay some normal maintenance. 

The need for better control of automotive vehicles, particularly passenger 
cars, is apparent. A study is being made under funds provided by the Controller on 
central budgeting, controlled use, preventative maintenance and replacement at the 
expiration of the useful life. 

The new Hall of Justice Service Station has been highly successful in serving 
the Police and other departments at the Hall of Justice and some City Hall vehicles. 
It is expected that the services provided will be expanded particularly greasing, 
minor adjustments, tires, and inspection for the proposed preventative maintenance 
program. 

Personnel of the Reproduction and Tabulating Bureau worked with many depart- 
ments on form design, reproduction problems, adaption to tabulating and others, which 
will result in the expanded use of these central facilities, and on coordination 
with projected EDP program. 

The Purchasing Department is actively participating in the EDP program. The 
Purchaser is on the committee appointed by the CAO for application to departments 
under him; the Supervisor of Tabulating is now on leave assigned to the EDP project; 
a number of department employees took general courses in this subject. 

CIVIL DEFENSE 

Civil Defense activities of the Purchasing Department included the following: 

1. Operating as Supply Service, participated in the "disaster situation" 
resulting from a severe earthquake April 15, 1963. Representatives of 
this department met with members of the Petroleum Coordinating Committee 
and other Civil Defense officials and formulated and presented a plan. 

2. Reviewed disaster instructions with new personnel. 

-u - 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, contracts 
for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco Unified School District. 
Except for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all buying starts with 
receipt of requisition from the using department. Included in or incidental to the 
procurement function are the following (outlined in detail in 1962 report): 

I. Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids including contractual and technical requirements j 
evaluation of bids; and award of bids. 

II. Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification file; 
new term contracts; and review of procedures, 

PERSONNEL 

The Buying Division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing and 
Services and includes 11 assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the 
Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, opening and 
tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and typing contracts. 
Funds for some of these employments, both buying and clerical, are provided by other 
departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

1 - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 - Senior Purchaser 
7 - Purchasers 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 
1 - Assistant Purchaser 

OP'JRATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for items 
of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation p -jriod make it 
advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy. 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the over-all progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for 
equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standardization 
and economy. 



- 5 - 



OPERATIONS - Continued 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish information 
that will indicate a standard of over-all quality and usefulness suitable for 
actual use-requirements and permit competition as required by the Charter and 
Administrative Code, (see Purchaser's letter dated May 1, 1962, subject: 
Requisitions for Equipment (And Certain Materials and Supplies)). Departments are 
invited to discuss preparation of requisitions as well as other purchasing methods 
with the purchasing department. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1. Review specifications, forms and procedures. 

2. Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional term 
contracts for articles and services where desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is apparent 
if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its purchasing 
functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basis as time is avail- 
able. Every effort should be made to procure a full time employment, preferably a 
a Senior Purchaser, for this work. 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service and 
commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a department. 
The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting when individual bids 
are requested and elimination of the costs involved in individual bids. A recent 
addition to the list of term contracts orovides for moving household and office 
equipment. Departments have been notified to inform the Purchasing Department 
regarding services or articles that might be advantageously purchased for them on 
term contracts. 

New term contracts initiated during the ye r include: 

1. Baby Formulas 

2. Chemicals for Science & Chemistry Depts. 

3. Science Supplies 

U. Audio-Visual Equipment 
5. Binding Opinions 

With the cooperation of the San Francisco Unified School District a five 
year contract was established for transporting handicapped children for the District, 
This service was previously contracted for on an annual basis with a local taxicab 
company. The new contract provides for the use of specially designed, small 
busses and personnel trained specifically for this operation. 

During the fiscal year 3H,ll6 purchase orders were issued which, together 
with encumbrance requests, totaled $16,828,1^3. Detailed analysis is shown in 
Table No. 1 in the Aooendix. 



- 6 - 



GENERAL 

CHARTER AMENDMENT 

As noted in the 1962 report, section 88,2 was added to the Charter giving 
the Board of Supervisors power to set purchasing limits. An ordinance amending 
the Administrative Code in this respect was enacted b r the Board and at the same 
time the complete Code Chapter 21 applicable to ourchasing was amended for the sake 
of clarity. The new purchasing limits set by the Board were up to $100, under 
rules established by the purchaser and approved by the chief administrative officer; 
up to $3000 by quotation (unadvertised bid) and beyond $3000 by proposal (advertised 
bid). In addition, certain commodities such as fresh fruits and vegetables and 
other perishable foods may be purchased by taking bids monthly (by quotation), which 
has been determined to be the most economical way to make such purchases All 
pending bids are available for public inspection in the Parchasing Department. 

The above changes, together with recent higher limits aporoved for revolving 
fund purchases and aided by new quarters affording more efficient working conditions 
have enabled purchasing personnel to work more efficiently. 

A substantial reduction in the number of purchase orders resulting from the 
above changes may be noted by reference to Table No. 1. 

STUDIES AND IMPROVE! 1ENTS 

CODING DIVISION 

The new Coding Division under the Bureau of Buying was established to 
furnish the Purchasing Department with a more complete source of information on 
items procured by the various departments of the City and to create a uniform code 
for all departments. 

A committee of five members of the Purchasing Dept. including representatives 
of buying, storing, tabulating and accounting was selected to explore the various 
methods used by other cities and private concerns on inventory, coding and control. 
They concluded the code should be based on the format established by the Armed 
Forces Supply Center, the cityoi'Uashington, D.C, and also the State of California. 

In August 1962 the services of John F. Forbes & Co. were contracted for to 
act in an advisory capacity on the format and scope of the coding system and to 
assist in classification. 

The division began operating in October 1962, xjith one Coding Supervisor, 
one Clerk-Typist and a clerk. An additional clerk-typist was employed after two 
months . 

The inventories of material stocked by the various departments were 
accumulated and punched on tabulating cards to determine the active material used. 
All the purchase orders for the fiscal year 1961-1962 were reviewed and cards were 
typed for all items other than the items stocked by departments. A total of 
aporoximately 80,000 items were thus identified. 



- 7 - 



CODING - Continued 

Using the cataloging handbook set up by the City of Washington D.C., with a 
few minor revisions, a coding method was established consisting of a nine digit 
code arranged as follows: 353.05-0001. The first digit "3" indicates material 
and supplies, the next two digits are group digits, "53" would be hardware, the 
fourth and fifth digit are the class digits, in this case "05" would be screws, 
the last four digits are item numbers. When established the digits on two and 
three will be the new Object of Expenditure number. 

Standard nomenclature is being established in general accord with the 
cataloging handbook of the Armed Forces Supply Center. 

It is expected that use of the code will make purchasing statistics readily 
available, adapt purchasing to automation, provide a basis for a master specifica- 
tion and item data file as well as simplifying requisition and purchase order 
writing. All requisitions will go first to the coding section which will verify 
the number and attach the master file folder containing, the code number, item 
designation, specification if applicable, bidders list, use record, previous 
department requisition and purchase order numbers. This folder will travel with 
the requisition, be up-dated, and returned to the file vhen the purchase order is 
issued. 

The work of establishing the code has reached the point where all the items 
assembled nave been grouped and classified. One group, number 65, has been set up, 
the word nomenclature established, and is being tabulated. 

A number of other groups are ready for card punching. The process of 
establishing uniform nomenclature and correct identification on items stocked has 
been a lengthy process but once established all departments should benefit* 

Purchasers Richard Winkler and Frank Fickett retired after years of 
conscientious service. It will be difficult to replace them because of their 
knowledge and experience in purchasing foods and textiles; and scientific supplies 
and equipment, furniture, office machines and major appliances - respectively. 
Their personality and sincerity in dealing with fellow employees, City departments 
and commercial firms resulted in better buying and service to departments. 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 

This Bureau, supervised by a Head Clerk with 2k employees, has charge of 
budgetary and personnel functions, processes bids, purchase orders and contracts; 
checks invoices Cor payment by Controller, sells charters, codes and other documents, 
and procures official bonds for officers and employees. There was a reduction of 
one employee during the year. 

Sales of charters, codes and other documents amounted to $125U. 

During the fiscal year 28,768 "regular" purchase orders, totaling $llj.,6l8,88l|. 
and 53U8 "petty" purchase orders totaling $211,881 were processed. This compares 
with 30,h6l "regular" and 10,39U "petty" purchase orders, written during the 
previous fiscal year. Detail is shown in Table No. 1 of the apoendix. 

Reduction of approximately %0% in the number of "petty" purchase orders 
processed was made possible by raising the amount which may be expended from 
departmental revolving funds from $15 to $25 and granting of authority for the 
Purchaser of Supplies to make advances for such purchases to departments not having 
revolving funds. This has permitted temporary assignment of one clerk from the 
"Petty Order" section to duties as assistant purchaser. 

Discounts earned amounted to $51,, 235 or 98.9 percent and discount unearned 
$58? or 1,1 percent. Comparable figures for the preceding year were $U8,680 or 
99.7^ and $161 or 0.3 percent. 

Processing of blanket purchase orders on Friden equipment was expanded 
during the year. It is expected that during the next few months blanket orders 
for all departments having a substantial numbar of such orders will be written on 
this equipment. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Improvement in the functioning of the office has been noted since moving 
into our new quarters. Additional storage space available for supplies, and 
documents for srle, has been helpful and has resulted in better service to the 
public . 



- 9 - 




Purchasing General Office 




Flexowriter Section 



BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES 



The Bureau of Equipment and Supplies operates and maintains a central 
warehouse and storerooms in various City departments receives and issues 
materials, supplies and equipment for all departments of the City and County of 
San Francisco, and makes miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account of the 
various agencies. This Eureau arranges and sells surplus and obsolete personal 
property belonging to the City; exchanges equipment between departments; maintains 
a perpetual inventory of all materials purchased for the City and County and makes 
periodic checks of such property, The Bureau also maintains master records en 
the City's automotive fleet including listings and numbering and, in addition, 
handles insurance and accident reporting. 



PERSONNEL 



The Bureau is staffed by the following: 

1 Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 Senior Clerk-Stenographer 

1 Senior Cleric-Typist 

2 Inventory Clerks 

10 Senior Storekeepers 
21 Storekeepers 

8 Assistant Storekeepers 

1 Laborer 

l#6 



Total 



STORES DIVISION 



The Stores Division operates the following stores: 
Name and Location Type 



Central Warehouse 



Central Warehouse Yard 
Dept. Public Works 
Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
San Francisco Airport 
Municipal Railway 



Health Department 



Public Welfare 

Dept. of Electricity 

Recreation and Park 

Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 

-:h:- Storage only 



15>th & Harrison 



Stationery 
Janitorial supplies 
2^00 cans foodstuffs 
Miscellaneous furniture 
Pipe & sewer material 



18U9 Harrison 

2323 Army Street 

639 Bryant Street 

Moccasin, Calif. 

South San Francisco 

2lrth & Utah Sts. and 2 sub-stores 

General Store 

Elkton Yard (Carbarn Fund) 

Potrero and one sub-store 

Washington & Mason (sub-store) 

SF General Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th Ave. & Dewey 

Hassler Health Home, Redwood City 

Single Mens' Rehabilitation Center, 

Redwood City, Calif. 
901 Rankin Street (Approx 



Hall of Justice Garage (sub-store) 
.Amount included with departmental inventory 
- 10 - 



Amount of 
Inventory 

ft 11,237 
3,698 



68,836 

391,300 

57,603 

19,819 

111,727 

219,361; 

52,092 

73,095 

U2,lli8 

197,291 

15U,087 

25,100 



2,788 
20,000 

22,653 
U8,Ui2 
38,lU0 



STORES DIVISION - Continued 

This past year has been a difficult year personnel wise, due to the lack 
of Civil Service lists for storekeepers. Fourteen new employees have been hired 
for periods of 90 days to 5> months which has caused terrific hardships in the 
departments affected. Four of our group received promotions to better positions, 
and much as we miss their experience and knowledge, we are always glad to have 
one of our group step up. 

The Department of Electricity, formerly at three locations, was consoli- 
dated into one storeroom-warehouse at 900 Rankin Street. We are working in 
cooperation with the Department of Electricity to establish a Revolving Fund for 
stores at the warehouse. 

The cement and pipe yardwiich formerly serviced the Department of Public 
Works was moved from 18U9 Harrison Street to 2323 Army Street, along with the 
inventory control of commodity stores. 

At the Central Warehouse changes were made in the storage facilities for 
the Public Administrator and a new room for staff meetings and assemblies 
established. 

We are looking forward to the move of stores from the Water Department yard 
on Bryant Street to the new yard in the Islais Creek area, sometime in the 1963- 
1961; fiscal year. This storeroom will replace the old dilapidated inefficient 
storeroom on Bryant Street. 

Certain changes had to be made at the Municipal Railway's Elkton Yard 
storeroom due to the construction of a new freeway. 

The effect of automation is having its repercussions. The change-over is 
taking time and the delays are very costly. This has caused added work to be 
thrown on the storekeepers in being sure the material is on hand when needed, 
and that the right amounts are ordered, 

Our Central Shoos storeroom received the second half of the new steel 
bins requested to reolace the old wooden units. 

The last unit of the heating system was installed at the Central Warehouse 
effecting a mean temperature of 68 degrees throughout the building. We have 
also improved our receiving program at the warehouse as to weights and specifi- 
cations and counts. 

While improvements have been made at storerooms in each department, there 
are many things to be done, most of -which require budget approval. A lifter 
truck to unload heavy loads of lumber, steel, etc., received and issued at the 
Municipal Railway's Elkton Yard store, was cancelled by the Supervisors, 

The storeroom at the Central Shops is in the process of having material 
coded, eliminating all obsolete stock, and building up a stock of active moving 
items required to service equipment in active use. 

At some store divisions new types of records geared to automation are 
being established to speed the processing of requisitions and for better 
regulation and control. 



BUREAU OF EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES - Continued 
SALES DIVISION 

Thirteen sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority 
of Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research into 
various aspects of different sales; preparing sales, inviting interested buyers to 
bid, opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all money received 
from buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence relative 
to the sales. 

The total revenue from sales 1962-1963 was $6U,058.28, as follows: 

Waste Paper $ 1,1*3^.79 

Grease and Bones 1,55U»3U 

Scrap lh,U95.8l 

Autos and Trucks 36,UliU.l±2 

Sand U, 786.60 
Used Office Furniture 576.79 

Fare Boxes 2,U6U.80 

Sacks 390.11 

Misc. Sales 1,910*62 

Total Revenue from sales $61*, 058.28 

The Bureau continued its selling procedure on used automobiles. By "Spot 
Bid Sales", in place of sealed bidsj more revenue per car is realized and sales 
are more speedily conducted and expedited. This method was well received by trade 
buyers. One hundred twenty eight passenger automobiles, and eighteen trucks were 
sold. 

INVENTORY DIVISION 

The program for this division includes the maintenance of a perpetual 
inventory of the City's equipment, moving and transferring, investigation and 
reporting of missing or stolen property and transferring of used equipment between 
departments. 

This division was assigned the task of coordinating the move of several 
departments, including Purchasing, Controller, State Legislative Representative, 
and the Department of Electricity. Procedures and. manuals were set up for orderly 
control of moving equipment and supplies which included estimates and budget 
appropriations to cover all contractual services dealing with the move. Meetings 
and conferences were held with department heads concerned to facilitate and expedite 
the proposed moves. These operations were completed during the year. Preliminary 
work was also done on the anticipated move of the Record Center to Fort Funston. 

During the fiscal year the Inventory Division reclaimed or rehabilitated 
office equipment and relocated same in various departments to the extent of $h5>,000 
inventory value. This obviated the necessity of buying new furniture and 
reflected a relief to the budget. 

The new method of inventorying all city equipment, as suggested by the Blyth- 
Zellerbach survey, is progressing and is currently about 90$ up-to-date, and in the 
hands of department heads. This program is a continuing process, and within the 
next few months will develop into a routine up-to-date procedure. 

- 12 - 



INVENTORY DIVISION - Continued 

Maintaining master records on City's automotive fleet continues to be an 
important responsibility of this division. The integration of the automobile 
records with tabulating is now fully operational. This provides a practical, 
comprehensive and flexible program in dealing with acquisition, assignment, licens- 
ing, insurance and disposition of the City's entire automobile fleet, valued at 
$2, 000, '300, and comprising approximately 3,000 vehicles. Automobile insurance 
coverages were extended to cover all city vehicles with the exclusion of emergency 
vehicles - police, fire and ambulances, and Municipal Railway revenue vehicles. 
Insurance coverages have been continued at $100/100,000 Bodily Injury Liability 
and $100,000 Property Damage Liability, thus affording substantial protection. 

As required by state law the bureau, working through the California Depart- 
ment of Motor Vehicles, completed a change of registrations and license plates on 
all City owned automotive eqaipment. This included a comolete audit of all vehicle 
changes since 1956. Due to the strict liaison between this bureau and the 
Department of Motor Vehicles and the operating departments, all city units were 
equipped with 1°63 series license plates prior to the issuance of plates to the 
general public on January 1, I963. 

GENERAL 

Some stores divisions are operating with the new encumbrance requests on 
vendors covering a period of one year or term of a contract; however, this is gradu- 
ally being eliminated and is being replaced by a new travelling requisition. This 
will speed up the operation to a greater degree than in the past. 

Much favorable publicity has been given the City by the daily press, radio 
and TV, locally and nationally, trade and national magazines, in connection with 
the sales program. 

All Senior Storekeepers and storekeepers in charge attended seminars con- 
ducted by the Mayor's Safety Committee at the Hall of Flowers. 

The Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor has attended several Material 
Handling meetings and has been present in an advisory capacity at several state 
examinations for storekeeping personnel. 

We have maintained close cooperation with other cities such as Osaka, Japan, 
the City of Fremont, Calif., and City of Los Angeles, on matters of loans of equip- 
ment, and have loaned a Wiley Traffic Signal for use in television (KTVU). 

The Stores and Equipment Supervisor attended the Governor's Safety Seminar in 
Los Angeles, and has already put into practice many suggestions received at that 
meeting. 

The Bureau proposes to have three of its personnel attend ED? sessions 
being conducted under the auspices of the Civil Service Commission to obtain a 
better knowledge of electronic data processing, and its application to the proposed 
over-all coding operations being planned for city-wide use. 

The educational program was shifted into high gear and it is a source of 
satisfaction that three of our members attended adult night school and graduated 
with a high school diploma. 

-13 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Central Shops and allied facilities provide necessary mechanical 
maintenance and repair service for all City departments and bureaus (excepting 
Public Utilities). In addition, it is the responsibility of this Bureau to 
inspect, appraise and make recommendations on all City owned vehicles contemolated 
for replacement, aid the various departments in the writing of specifications, and 
to receive and approve all new vehicles delivered to the City and County of 
San Francisco. 

Administration and major repair facilities are located at the Central Shops, 
800 Quint Street. Other installations are: Golden Gate Park Shoo, providing 
maintenance for Recreation and Park Department equipment; new Hall of Justice 
Service Station where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police and other City 
cars, and inspection and light maintenance for Police vehicles; Dept. of Public 
Works 1 Army Street Yard and 19th Avenue Station; Health Dept. Garage; and Department 
of Electricity Yard. 

The Central Shops have four main maintenance shop areas: 1. Automobile, 
2. Truck, 3. Fire Apparatus, U. Machine, and the following auxiliary shops: 
Blacksmith, Pattern, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body & Fender, Tire, and Service 
Station. In addition to the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of 
mechanical equipment in school buildings, sewage plants, pulping stations, public 
buildings etc., 1678 motorized units of the City owned fleet are n aintained, an 
increase of 72 over the fiscal year l°6l-62. 

There were no additional employees added to the Bureau in this fiscal year. 
There are 9h budgeted employments as follows : 

1 City ^hops General Superintendent 

1 Automotive Machinist General Foreman 

2 Automotive Machinist Foremen 

U A utomotive Machinist Sub-Foremen 

1 Maintenance Machinist Foreman 
8 Maintenance Machinist 

28 Automotive Machinist 

3 Automotive Mechanic 
28 Automotive Servicemen 

2 Pattern Maker 

3 Car and Auto Painter 
3 Body & Fender Workers 
3 Blacksmith 

2 Blacksmith Finisher 

1 Upholsterer 

1 Chauffeur 

1 Senior Account Clerk 

1 Accountant 

1 Account Clerk 

In addition, 1 General Storekeeper and 1 Storekeeper are assigned to the 
Central Shops to procure, store and issue stock and supplies. 



-lit - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 

Jacob Fischer, Automotive Machinist General Foreman, retired after 33>2 
years of City service. The efficient operations of Shop #2 (Truck Shop) and later 
the Central Shops were in large measure due to his knowledge and leadership. 

Harry Zandt, Automotive Machinist Sub-Foreman: Clyde Walker, Blacksmith 
Finisher; Laurence Casement, Maintenance Machinist, retired from Central Shops after 
many years of faithful service to the City and County of San Francisco. 

The following is a report of the year's activities of the various shops and 
sub-shops of the Central Shops : 

Automobile Shop 

The automobile shop staffed with 7 Automotive Machinists Mechanics, 
2 Automotive Servicemen and one Foreman, Mr. A. Kerri, is responsible for the 
repair and maintenance of 557 City owned passenger cars, including Police cars. 
It should be noted that the City fleet was increased by over 10$ during the year, 

A total of 2I)il. jobs were completed by this shop. 

A major project completed was the outfitting cf over 115 new or replacement 
special duty cars for Police, Fire, Sheriff, etc., with red lights, sirens, screens 
and other necessary equipment. 

Truck Shop 

The Truck 3 hop is responsible for the maintenance and repair of over 600 
trucks and specialized equipment used by various departments of the City. 

The shop is staffed with 10 Automotive Machinists, 2 Automotive Servicemen 
and one Automotive Machinist Foreman, James Elliot. A total of 2970 jobs were 
completed during the fiscal year, including vrork for all departments on a wide 
variety of equipment as : 

13>1 Pickup trucks 
27 Heavy Duty Trucks 
93( Medium Duty Trucks 

8 Tractors 
52 Air Compressors 

27 Light special equipment - ambulances, bookmobile, basses, concrete 
cutters, portable light and blower units, chain saws, etc. 
190 Heavy special equipment as: motor sweepers, motor flushers, 

mechanical debris loaders, eductors, rollers, back hoes, bucket 
loaders, graders, bit sprayers, heater planer, asphalt sprayer, fork 
lifts, crane trucks, welders, farm equipment, sewer cleaners, power 
mowers, paint stripers and sickle bars 

Major jobs included extensive repair and modification to Street Repair's 
heater-planer to increase operating efficiency and lessen down-time of this 
essential equipment. 

- 15 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Truck Shop - (Cont.) 

After a disastrous fire on the asphalt spreader, caused by fueling the 
equipment at the jobsite, a new larger gas tank was built, relocated, and the fuel 
system modified eliminating this fire hazard. 

Extensive alterations were made to the electrical system of the Traffic 
Painter's paint striper truck. Also, amber lights were installed on truck to relieve 
the hazard to crew created by the necessity of driving down the center stripe . 

Three new curb paint trucks were completely outfitted for service, including 
installation, on each truck, of an air crmpressor and equipment racks and providing meai 
for proper ventilation. 

The paint and rebuild program continues. On the larger equipment this 
includes steam clean, sand blast, rebuild worn parts and paint completely. With 
this program we have been able to extend useful service of 6 heavy duty trucks and 
2 motor sweepers. 

Fire Apparatus Shop 

This shop is one of the major repair facilities of the Central Shops. 

The staff consists of 8 Automotive Machinists, one Automotive Serviceman, 
one Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. L. Counihan, and 1 Automotive Machinist Sub- 
Foreman, Harry Zandt (retired July 1, 1963). 

Daring the fiscal year a total of 820 jobs was completed and lli32 service 
calls made for minor field repairs to fire apparatus. 

The apparatus conversion program progressed. 5 Seagrave Pumps were converted 
to modern triple combination units, one American La France pump rebuilt to a foam 
unit, and one rescue unit converted to a salvage unit. 

This completes the extensive apparatus conversion program of the Central Shops. 
A total of 2U units of fire fighting equipment was converted and rebuilt into modern 
up-to-date apparatus at a minimum cost to the City, 

Three new American La France triple combinations, one new American La France 
aerial, and one new Seagrave aerial were equipped and tested and put into service. 

The following partial list is indicative of the type of work done in this shop. 

18 engines removed and completely overhauled 

26 clutches replaced 

39 sets of brakes relined and drums turned 

22 transmissions overhaules 
81 engine tune-ups 

12 fire pumps overhauled 

hh mufflers and t ail pipes replaced 

23 steering gears overhauled and repaired 
1*6 radiators removed and replaced (repaired) 
33 aerial hydraulic repairs 

80 front red lights replaced for legal red lights 

- 16 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Fire Apparatus Shop -(Cont.) 

The fact that fire apparatus is becomming more complex presents many more 
difficult maintenance problems. Uith the increasing alarms the apparatus is working 
more hours than formerly. This shop has met the challenge and quality and quantity 
standards have been maintained. 

Machine Shop 

This shop is the main machine shop, hose and broom repair shop and 3 sub- 
Machine Shops - one at each of the Sewage Treatment Plants, 

The entire division is staffed by 8 Maintenance Machinists and one Foreman, 
Mr. Ed. Rames. 

Repair, maintenance and reconstruction of tools, machinery and mechanical 
installations and equipment are the main functions of the Machine Shops. This 
includes the manufacture of parts for the above, construction of special units as 
requested and machine operations incidental to the automotive divisions. 

A few of the major jobs completed during the year were: 

1. City Hall - Complete overhaul and reconversion of the main heating and 
ventilating blowers to roller bearing "Vee" drives and relocation of 
drive motors. 

2. Geary-Fillmore Underpass - Design and construction of special expanding 
flange-seals for H.P. fire line crossovers. 

3. H.P. system (Fire Dept.) - Design and construction of special testing 
equipment for hydrostatic test of new type cast iron water mains. 

h. Civic Center Powerhouse - Complete reconstruction and refitting of large 
boiler injector pumps. 

5. Islais Creek Bridge - Reconstruction of automatic traffic gates. 

6. Seacliff Sewage Pumping Station - Complete overhaul of main pumps. 

7. Yosemite Sewage Pumping Station - Complete overhaul of main pumps. 

8. San Andreas Pumps. (Park Dept. & Co. Jail #2) - Complete overhaul of 2 
main pumps and one standby. 

9. Park Dept. - Overhaul and reconstruction of main irrigation pumps 
(Strawberry Reservoir). 

10. Park Dept. - Overhaul merry-go-round children playground . 

Sewage Treatment Plants - 1. Southeast Plant - 1 Machinist, 2. Northpoint Plant - 

1 Machinist, 3. Richmond Sunset - 1 Machinist. 

Each of the treatment plants has its own machine shop with limited facilitie: 
Overflow jobs are handled by the main shop when necessary. Supervision is under thf 
main shop foreman. 

- 17 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Machine Shop -(Cont.) 

Due to 2U hour daily operation of these vital plants the assigned men are on 
a continuing rotation of rebuilding and repairing pumps, filters, elevators, 
conveyors, driers and other units characteristic to sex^age treatment* 

Blacksmith Shop 

This shop is staffed with 3 Blacksmiths and 2 Blacksmith Finishers who forge 
and manufacture all necessary parts to outfit fire apparatus and other city trucks; 
straighten truck frames and heavy components damaged in accidents; manufacture and 
sharpen crow bars, gads, punches, chisels, etc. 

Major jobs consist of manufacture of tool heater for Street Repair Dept.; 
manufacture of 10 pickup buggies for street cleaners and the outfitting of 5 new 
fire apparatus. 

This shop recently suffered the loss of k of its experienced employees due 
to retirement and promotions* 

Pattern and Ladder Shop 

This shop, staffed with 2 Patternmakers, manufactured 12 Fire Department 
ladders; repaired and made 30 new patterns; repaired 83 ladders; made cabinets 
and repairs to office furniture; tested new and repaired ladders at Fire College; 
inspected ladders in fire houses, and performed related woodworking jobs. 

Paint Shop 

The Paint Shop staffed with 3 Car & Auto Painters, completely repainted or 
did major paint work on numerous City vehicles and equipment; finished new ladders 
and refinished repaired ladders; removed City seals from turn-in cars and installed 
new seals and numbers on all new equipment; painted damaged and repaired City 
vehicles; painted office furniture; stenciled all new and repaired equipment for 
the Fire Department, etc. 

Hose & Broom Shop 

One Maintenance Machinist divides his time between inspection and repair of 
all types of hose and fittings and also the rebuilding and repair of the brooms 
used in the mechanical street sweepers. 

During the year 27,100 feet of new fire hose was inspected, tested, labeled 
and distributed. An equal amount was backed down to the lower pressure zone. 
Another like amount was condemned for sale or disposal. 

This shoo also rebuilt 6l rotary brooms ior the Street Cleaning Department's 
motorized unit. 



- 18 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Upholstery Shop 

This shop, staffed by one Upholsterer, manufactured and repaired all 
covers, leather goods, protective devices, etc. used by the Fire Dept. In addition, 
vehicle seats were upholstered. A total of 387 major jobs and several hundred 
minor jobs was completed. 

The demand for service has increased to the point where work had to be 
contracted out of the shop. An additional man in this shop would permit keeping 
pace with the demand for service. 

Recreation and Park Shop 

This shop, located in the maintenance yard area of Golden Gate Park, is 
staffed with 3 Automotive Machinists, one Automotive Serviceman and 1 Foreman, 
Mr. Ben Shain. 

Maintenance and repairs were performed on the following pieces of equipment 
assigned to the Recreation & Park Departmart: 

21 Passenger cars 
li8 Miscellaneous trucks 
20 Tractors 

U7 Misc. units, pumps-air compressors, spray machines, 
sweepers, chain saws, etc. 
113 Power Lawn Mowers 
£0 Hand Lawn Mowers 

During the fiscal year 677 repair jobs were completed on automotive equipment 
and U79 on various power and hand mowers. 

Repairs and maintenance are handled currently with a minimum of down-time 
even though additions, particularly power lawn mowers, are continuously being 
made to the equipment for which this shop is responsible. 

Hall of Justice Service Station 

This facility at 9^0 Bryant Street operates 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to 
midnight. It is staffed with 9 Automotive Servicemen, 2 Automotive Machinist and 
one Sub-Foreman, Mr. Jack Quinn. 

The orime function of this station is to fuel and service Police vehicles, 
in addition, fuel and oil is provided for any City department desiring to use the 
facilities. Presently i|0,000 gallons of gasoline and 800 quarts of oil are 
dispensed each month. This is an increase of approximately 33% over last year. 
The service area provides minor repairs to all Police cars and grease, oil change anc 
preventative maintenance inspection to 2^0 Police cars. (Previously all Police 
cars were serviced under contract). 



- 19 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Hall of Justice Service Station - (Cent.) 

A review of the records show that for the fiscal year 1962-63 a total of 
1032 tow jobs were completed, Ul60 tires changed, 870 batteries changed and 
serviced, 3860 mechanical repairs made and 2352 cars greased, serviced and 
inspected. This is a substantial increase over last year's activities. 

The program of inspection and service at this station has paid off in 
better operating Police cars with a minimum of down-time. It is hoped that an 
additional Automotive Serviceman might soon be acquired so that the service 
contract might be cancelled and all Police cars, and vehicles assigned to other 
departments operating from the Hall of Justice, might receive this improved 
service at the station. 

The need tor future expanded facilities can be forseen in this location. 
It is therefore suggested consideration be given to acquiring the property 
adjacent to the station, soon to be vacated by the State. 

Accounting Section 

The Accounting section is now providing assistance to departments serviced 
at Central Shops by establishing a "monthly cost to repair/maintain rate" for 
passenger cars and light trucks. This rate was utilized in preparation of some 
departmental budget estimates. Estimates so prepared reflected a more accurate 
determination of a departments funding requirements. 

Several similar fleet operations were visited during the past year to 
study other approaches to the problem of compiling valid maintenance cost figures. 
Several worthwhile ideas were noted and are nox* included in our shop accounting 
procedures. It is hoped the current year will permit further visits to similar 
activities, both private and governmental. 

In an effort to provide better service to operating departments and to take 
advantage of the City's bulk buying power, gasoline and oil service was made 
available to City vehicles at all of the Purchasing Department Service Stations. 

These stations located at 19th Avenue near Taraval, Golden Gate Park 
Maintenance area, DPW's Army St. Yard, Central Shops, and Hall of Justice Station 
can conveniently fuel City vehicles at the lowest possible cost. 

STUDIES AHD IMPROVEMENTS 

Studies 

Studies of the Central Shop and its operations lead to the conclusion that 
there must be a more compatible relationship between the units of equipment in the 
fleet, control of the vehicles, dollars appropriated and manpower. It is 
anticipated that a study soon to be made by Forbes & Co. will bear this out. 

Efficient fleet operations demands a sound inspection and rigidly enforced 
preventative maintenance program throughout the entire fleet. With such a program 
the City can expect considerable savings with the reduction of major repairs, 
equipment down-time and lost time of operation. A limited program of this type is 
now in force, expansion to all of the fleet will, of necessity, require additional 
manpower. 

- 20 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Studies - (Cont. ) 

It is planned, during the next year, to study the feasibility of providing 
maintenance and repair service on City equipment such as typewriters, filing cabinets, 
hospital beds, furniture, etc. It Is felt that present makeshift maintenance on 
such equipment is unduly expensive and inefficient, and that a oroperly equipped 
work area staffed with skilled craftsmen will provide greatly increased production 
and longer useful life to City equipment. 

Improvements 

1. An unused pit area was put to storage use by the design of a sub-floor 
shelving area and above floor structure^ for safe and orderly storage of 
brass and steel bar stock, in the Machine Shop. 

2. Enlargement of the height clearance of the Body & Fender Shop sliding 
doors to permit entry of larger trucks for indoor servicing. 



- 21 - 









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Central Shops 800 Quint St. 




Hall of Justice Service Station 

QSn Rr-vant St. . 



TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Tabulating and Reproduction Bureau provides centralized service, 
available to all City and County departments, in machine accounting (IBM), blue- 
printing, photography, offset printing, mimeograph, photostat, and electrostatic 
copying (Xerox). 

The Bureau occupies four locations: 2 tabulating units - City Hall and 
Hall of Justice; 2 reproduction units in the City Hall - blueprinting on the 
5th floor and other reproduction services in basement. Funds have been 
appropriated and plans drawn to relocate the blueprinting section in space adjoin- 
ing other bureau facilities. This move will improve operating efficiency and 
provide better service to departments. 

The Bureau is administered by a Central Services Supervisor with the 
assistance of a Tabulating Division Supervisor. Funds for operating expenses 
are provided by budget transfers and work orders from departments using these 
services. The total cost for work processed during the fiscal year 1962-1963 
amounted to f)229,238, an increase of $11,561± over the previous fiscal year. 

TABULATING SECTION 

Room 158, City Hall Room 125, Hall of Justice 

personnel : 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating 1 Principal Tabulating Machine Operator 

1 Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 3 Tabulating Machine Operators 

2 Tabulating Machine Operators 5 Key Punch Operators 

1 Key Punch Operator 

Equipment : 

2 Key Punch Machines 7 Key Punch Machines 
2 Sorting Machines 3 Sorting Machines 

1 Collator 2 Collators 

1 Interpreter 1 Interpreter 

1 Reproducer-Summary Punch 2 Reproducers 

2 Accounting Machines 2 Accounting Machines 

Major Recurring Functions of the Tabulating Section 

Department Function 

Municipal Court Traffic Citations : 

Calendars, Notices, Warrants, Adjudication 
Statistics, Abstracts, Paid and Unpaid License 
File, Paid and Unpaid Name File, and !Iiscellaneous 
Records and Reports 

Civil Service Commission Salary Standardization Reports 

Salary Survey Data Analysis 
Recruitment and Examination Records 



- 22 - 



TABULATING SECTION - C ntd. 



Department 



Controller 



Tax Collector 



Function 

Budget Statistics 

Tabulation of Officials' Bonds 

Canceled Warrant Report 

Summary of Unpaid Property Taxes 

Daily Encumbrance Posting Reports (Purchase Orders) 

EDP (see below) 

License Tax Accounting: 

Hotels, Apartment Houses, Food Inspection, Pin Ball 

Machines, etc. 
Hotel Transient Tax 



Registrar of Voters 



Dept. of Public Health 



Purchasing Department 



Public Utilities 
Heat, Light, and Power 



Election Officer Payroll 
Election Analysis and Statistics 

Birth and Death Indexes and Statistics 

Cost Accounting-Central Office and San Francisco 

General Hospital 
Inventories-San Francisco General Hospital (see below) 
Public Health Field Nursing; : T.B. Patient Subsidy Reports 
X-ray Statistics; Emergency Hospital Statistics; 
Ward Census Summary; Inventories-LHH (see below) ; 
Budget Statistics 

Inventrries-Equipmavt and Warehouse 

Stores Stationery Control 

Record of Average Use (materials) 

Fee Tag Reports 

Purchase Order Registers 

Shop Expenditure Reports 

Vehicle Maintenance Cost Accounting 

Contracts and other Statistics 

Distribution and Accounting Records of Consumption of 
Gas and Electricity by Cit3 r and County Departments 



The scope of machine accounting operations performed by the Bureau 
continues to expand. During the fiscal year the following procedures were 
inaugurated : 



For the Controller - A record of employee training in the field of elec- 
tronic data processing (EDP). This will record courses taken and 
comoleted and will prove of great value to the City, and to the employees, 
with respect to future assignments in this new and growing field of 
automation. 

For the San Francisco General Hospital - Medical Records and Discharge 
Analysis. Also inventories of Culinary Supplies, Linen Supplies, Nursing 
Supplies, and General Office and Stationery Supplies, 

For the Laguna Honda Home - Inventories of Commissary Equipment and 
Supplies, Commissary Food Suoplies, and Pharmaceutical Supplies,, 

- 23 - 



REPRODUCTION SECTION 



Two Locations, Room f>0 Basement and £th Floor, City Hall 



Personnel: 



1 Supervisor of Central Services 

1 Photographer 

1 Photographer, as needed 

1 Photostat Operator 

1 Photostat Operator, part time 

1 Sr. Blueprinting Machine Operator 

2 Blueprinting Machine Operators 
1 Sr. Offset Machine Operator 

1 Offset Machine Operator 
1 Sr. Account Clerk 



Equipment : 



1 Blueprint Machine 

2 Ammonia Process Machines (dry process) 

1 Photostat Machine 

2 Microfilm Cameras 

2 Mimeograph Machines 

2 Offset Duplicating Machines 

Cameras, Enlargers, Printers, etc. 

* Also acts in the capacity of Supervisor of Reproduction. 

Major Recurring Functions of the Reproduction Section 

Department Function 



All Departments 

Various Departments (20) 

Assessor 

City Attorney 

Board of Supervisors 

Purchasing 

Treasurer 

Recreation and Park 



Departmental Budget Estimates 

Annual Reports 

Real Property Transfer Records 

Opinions and other Legal Papers 

Calendars and Ordinances 

Bids, Specifications, and Purchasing Records 

Microfilm Record of Checks Deposited 

Specifications for Construction, Maintenance, and 



Repair of Buildings, Parks, & Recreation Facilities 

SF Unified School District Annual Budget 

Public Works, Engineering, Contract Sets of Blueprints for Construction, 
Bureau of Architecture, Maintenance, and Repair of Public Buildings, Streets, 
Recreation & Park, SFUSD Sewers, and Recreational Facilities 

Public Works, City Attorney, Photography in connection with Construction Progress, 
SF Unified School District Earth Slides, Accidents, Redevelopment and Planning 

Assessor, Public '- 7 orks,Real Blueprinting of Block Maps of the City and County 
Estate, Recorder, Tax 
Collector, Purchasing 

In addition to the major functions listed above the Bureau performs many 
hundreds of nonrecurring jobs for City departments. In most instances time is 
the essence - a deadline must be met. It is in the fulfillment of these 
obligations that the Bureau performs one of its most valued services to the City 
and County. 

- 2U - 



TABULATING AND REPRODUCTION BUREAU - Continued 
STUDIES AND IMPROVEMENTS 



Studies 



Studies are being conducted with Laguna Honda Hospital staff on expansion 
of IBM and Tabulating services including: 

Rehabilitation Analysis and Patient Analysis - classified in accordance 
with the standard nomenclature. The first includes information concerning 
condition on entrance, degree of improvement, and follow-up information on 
self care and living arrangements. The latter concerns sex, race, geriatrics, 
pediatrics, operations, post-operative deaths, autopsies, and coroner's cases. 

Studies are also being conducted on the establishment of Ward Census 
Reports. These reports will provide statistical information concerning 
beginning census, admittances, births, transfers-in, transfers-out, deaths, 
discharges, and closing census. Information will be recorded daily and reports 
prepared monthly and semiannually. 

Merger of the IBM machine accounting unit of the Department of Public 
Works with Central Tabulating is being studied. Discussions are in the prelimin- 
ary stages and there are many problems that must be resolved before such a 
consolidation could be effected. However, it does appear to have great merit. 
A number of present procedures are adaptable to EDP, and the remaining work can 
be accommodated on less equipment than is now under rental. Also, less 
personnel will be required and it will be possible to release some of the 
operators to the EDP Droject, 

A study of possible revisions and improvements in the present method of 
providing abstracts of property transfers for the Assessor has been started. 
The daily volume of work involved in this project has been steadily increasing 
the past few years to a point where it is now nearly double that planned for 
the system, devised over ten years ago. The object will be to expedite 
transmission of this information and to reduce cost. 

Improvements 

A Xerox electrostatic copy service was inaugurated in October, The central 
use of this equipment resulted in considerable savings to the City and proved 
highly satisfactory as indicated by the following figures: October - U,a35 
copies; January - 10,338 copies; June - 13,651 copies, 

A new offset duplicator was installed to accovonodate standard paper 
sizes 11 x 17" and ll; x 17", making it possible to offer a much wider range of 
lithographic service. Maximum paper size of the smaller machine is 10 x lit". 

In addition to the installation of the larger offset press funds have 
been provided in the 1963-64 budget for replacement of the process camera and 
paper cutter. The volume of work is expected to increase materially as a 
result of these improvements. For this reason funds have been requested to 
enlarge the working areas for lithographic service and to increase the dark- 



room facilities. 



- 25 - 



P P E N D I X 




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TABLE 


NO. 


1 








Shoving 








Purchase 


; Orders 


Processed 




1962-63 






1961-62 




Purchase 
Orders 


Amount 






Purchase 
Orders Amount 


General 


Hi, 755 


$6,615,121 






17,220 $7,U13,237 


Education 


6,lU3 


3,196,583 






S,9^ 3,086,905 


Health 


U,U02 


2,Ul9,Hi3 






U,588 2,l|2li,5l6 


Utilities 


3,168 


2,388,037 






2,675 3,380,796 


Petty P.O.s 


5,3U8 


211,881 






10,39U 296,717 




3U,116 


$1^,830,765 






Uo,855 $16,602,171 


Purchases by 




1,997,378 
$16,828, 1U3 






_ 


Encumbrance 
Requests 


$16,602,171 



TABLE NO. 2 
EXPENDITURES 



Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all operating 
appropriations except Personal Services for 1962-1963: 



Account 

Contractual Services 

2.311.200,000 
Materials & Suoplies 

2.311.300.000 
Equipment 

2.315.U00.311 
Premium - Official Bonds 

2. 315. 812. 311 
Premium - Auto Insurance 

2. 315. 813. 311 
llembership Dues 

2.311,800.000 



Budgeted 


Encumbered & 
Expended 


$30,683 


$28,181 


Ik, 000 


Hi, 076 


32,150 


29,006 


8,U85 


7,318 


38,615 


38,201 


831 


827 



Total $12U,76U $117,< 



Surplus 
% 3,502 

3,Hili 

1,167 

UlU 

h 

$ 8,231 



Deficit 



$ 76 



REVENUES 



Comparison of revenues T .dth estimated revenues 1962-63 



Account 


Estimated 
Revenue 


Actual 
Revenue 


Over 
Estimated 


Under 
Estimated 


Sale of Documents 

7061 
Minor Sales 

7062 
Sale of Grease 

7621 


$ 850 


$ 1,25U 




$ hoU 


U,200 


5,386 




1,186 


900 


1,283 




383 



Total 



5,950 



$ 7,923 



$1,973 



TABLE NO. 3 

SHOP EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
aopropriations except personal services for 1962-1963: 



Object 

Administrative Salaries 

Wages 

Contractual Services 

Materials and Supplies 

Retirement 

Work Orders 

Contractual Services 
Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 
Expenditure 

Materials and Supplies 
Original appropriation 
By transfer 
Less unexpended 



Total 



Total 



1962-63 



1961-62 



Total 



Amount 


Amount 


$ 9,626 


$ 17,625 


506,279 


U9U,907 


in,ia$ 


107,772 


187,U81 


176,317 


6,105 


5,795 


87,753 


63,798 


$908,659 


$866, 2LU 


$ 77,91*6 


$ 72,58U 


36,7U3 
11U,689 


36,623 
109,207 


3,27U 


1,U35 


$111, Ul5 


$107,772 


$166, 9U5 


$159,718 


2i,U6o 

188, Uo5 
92U 


16,650 

176,368 

50 


$187,U81 


$176,318 



F 



SAN Ff.A.. . 
PUBLIC LIRRARY 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



ANNUAL REPORT. 
FISCAL YEAR 1963-1961* 



August, 196U 



City and County of San Francisco 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 

270 CITY HALL 



August 28, 196U 



Annual Report 
Fiscal Year 1963-Sh 



Mr. Sherman P. Duckel 

Chief Administrative Officer 

289 City Hall 

Dear Mr. Duckel: 

The annual report of the Purchasing Department for the fiscal year ending 
June 30, 196U is herewith respectfully submitted. 

This report reflects significantly the excellent work of the department 
under Mr. Een Benas, my predecessor, who retired as Purchaser of Supplies 
on January 31* 196U. Among the legal, nrocedural and physical changes 
initiated or made by Mr. Eenas are these: 

1. Charter amendment providing that purchasing limits be set by 
Board of Supervisors, Subsequently, the Administrative Code was 
amended to provide for modem, realistic limits and concurrently 
the other sections of the code pertinent to the Purchasing Depart- 
ment were clarified and amended where such could be done to the 
City's advantage, 

2. New, larger quarters for Bureau of Buying and Personnel and 
Accounts were acquired, designed for and resulting in better 
service to the public and other City departments and for more 
efficient operation, 

3. A coding system for equipment, materials and supplies was 
substantially completed. 

The above and other improvements by Mr. Benas have resulted in material 
savings to the City, 

As stated in detail in the report the department expended $17,0°6,3U5 by 
33*712 purchase orders and $llj.,20U,233 by encumbrance requests; maintained 
2$ storerooms; sold $37,951 surplus City property and did 6703 shop jobs 
in the amount of $9^3*602. Tabulating Bureau furnished services in the 
amount of $137*023 and Reproduction Bureau in the amount of $65,821, 

Continued effort is being made by all bureaus to give departments faster 
and better service. 

Service at the Hall of Justice Service Station is continually expanding. 
Central Shops service is improving as new modern equipment is being 
procured on a planned schedule. 



- 2 - 

Mr. Sherman P, Duck el, CAO August 28, 1961; 

More varied duplicating and reproduction services are being performed with 
new equipment. Central Tabulating services are being expanded and 
coordinated with EDP program. 

The problems associated \<n.th operating with temporary help were of concern 
particularly at shops and in stores. 

The following statements on the activities of the department for past fiscal 
year answer the specific inquiries of the Mayor to all departments, dated 
July 21, 196U. 

1. There x-rere no capital programs in progress during the year, 

2, Recommendations on the activities of the department, as stated 
in the annual report include : 

a. "Establish specification and control system for buying on a 
full time basis. 

b. Establish automobile management system to provide for trouble- 
free operation of vehicle fleet including an appropriate 
replacement program,, 

c. Install the recently completed coding system for equipment, 
materials and supplies to the end that it can be used to the 
fullest advantage by City departments 

3» The comparison of expenditures for all appropriations other than 
those for personal services with original budget appropriations 
for 1963-1?6U is given in the aopendix, annual report. Funds for 
departments ' activities are obtained mainly by transfers from 
budget appropriations of other departments. 

U. The comparison of revenues with revenues estimated in the budget 
of I963-6U is given in the appendix, annual report. 

$. The budget appropriations of other departments for automotive and 
other equipment services, anc 1 for tabulating and reproduction, 
should be increased yearly to compensate for the increase in T .7ork 
required, and for steadily increasing labor and material costs. 

6. The statistics on work accomplished are given in the annual report. 

In this, my first annual report, I wish to take the opportunity to thank you 
for your confidence in me on my recent appointment and to thank my fellow 
workers in the Purchasing Department for their cooperation, loyalty and 
enthusiasm without which the department could not function as efficiently 
and as effectively. 

Very truly yours, 

T. F. CONWAY / 
Purchaser of Supplies 



ANNUAL REPORT 



August, 196U 



PURCHASING DEPARTMENT 
CITY AND COUNTY OF SAN FRANCISCO 



The Department purchases materials and supplies, equipment and contractual 
services for all departments for the City and County, including city-owned 
utilities, and the San Francisco Unified School District; repairs and maintains 
automotive and other equipment for the various departments, except Public Utilities, 
and for the School District as requested; operates a central tabulating and repro- 
duction bureau for departments requiring its services; transfers to other departments 
for use or sells equipment and supplies no longer useful to any department of the 
city; maintains a perpetual inventory of equipment in the various departments; and 
operates central stores of the Purchasing and various other departments. 

In addition, advisory service is given to other departments by the Shops on 
equipment and mechanical problems and by the Eureau of Buying on new products, 
specifications and prices, 

PERSONNEL 

Employments totaled 20£ permanent in five bureaus plus h temporary for 
developing a standard code. The Organization Chart is shown in the Appendix, 



Supervisory - June 30, 1961; 



Administrative 



T. F. Conway - Purchaser of Supplies - Appointed 2/I/6J4. 
B. Benas - Purchaser of Supplies - Retired l/3l/6U 
H. Shiman - Secretary 



Bureaus 



Buying 



T. F. Conway - Assistant Director Purchasing and Services 
Bureau Head and Assistant Department Head ■ 

do (acting) 
Senior Purchaser - (to Feb. I96I4) 



(to Feb. I96I4) 



J. C. Gavin 

J. C. Gavin 

C. P. Webster - Senior Purchaser (acting) 

H. R. Stevens - Coding Supervisor 



Equipment and Supplies 

J. E. Leary - Stores and Equipment Supgrvisor - Bureau Head - (to 5>/l/61|.) 
J. H. Beck - Stores and Equipment Supervisor (acting) 



- 1 



Bureaus - Continued 



Personnel and Accounts 



J. Brackett - Head Clerk - Bureau Head 

M. J. Wehrle- Principal Clerk - (to 7/15/6U) 

R. A. Davis - Principal Clerk 



Shoos 



A. M. Flaherty - City Shops General Superintendent - Bureau Head 
P. Shain, City Shops Assistant Superintendent (to a/l5/61|) 

B. A. Rames, City Shops Assistant Superintendent (U/L6/6U - acting) 



Tabulating 

H. 
J. 



Egliht - Tabulating Division Supervisor (acting) - Bureau Head 
Bender - Tabulating Division Supervisor (Temporary assignment to EBP 
Staff) 



Reproduction 

G. A, Stanley - Central Services Supervisor - Bureau Head (to 8/1/63) 
T. J. Ryan - Blueprint and rieorcduction Manager - Bureau Head 
(9/11/63 - acting) - (1/27/6U permanent) 

The valued services of the following were separated from City employment 
through retirement or death after years of meritorious accomplishment : 
Name Position Approx. Years 



Retired 

George A. Stanley 

Matthew P. Dugan 
Harris F. Irving 
Edward W. Patrick 
B. H. Schettler 
Bolger, James J, 
Roy L. Bartmess 
Ben Benas 
Benjamin Shain 
James Leary 
Gene Waller 
James Brackett 
Elizabeth Angelius 

Died 

David Offenterg 
Earl Johnson 
Edward D. Donovan 



Central Services Supervisor 

Storekeeper 

Automotive Machinist 

Storekeeper 

Purchaser 

Automotive Machinist 

Auto. Body & Fender Worker 

Purchaser of Supplies 

City Shops Asst. Supt. 

Stores & Equipment Superv, 

Automotive Machinist 

Head Clerk 

Tabulating Mach. Operator 



Storekeeper 

Offset Machine Operator 
Automotive Machinist 



City Service 



26 

% 
18 
23 
30 

31 

29i 
38| 

3U 

351 



Date 



8-1-63 

9-1-63 

9-1-63 

10-1-63 

11-1-63 

11-1-63 

2-1-6U 

2-1-6U 

U-16-6U 

5-1-6U 
5-2-6ii 
6-30-6H 
6-30-6I1 



10-28-63 
11-8-63 
6-16-6U 



- 2 - 



Work Accomplished 



The work accomplished in the fiscal year, described in more detail -under 
the separate bureaus remained substantially the same over-all as in 1962-63, the 
apparent increase in one area (encumbrance requests) being explained in foot note, 
Recapitulation is as follows: 



Bureau 



Unit 



1962-1963 



1963 -1961; 



Buying 



Stores & Equipment 

Shops 

Tabulating 
Reproduction 



Purchase Orders 
Amount 

Encumbrance Requests - 
Amount # 

Surplus Sales - Amount 
Major Stores operated 

Job Orders 
Expenditures 

Services rendered - Amount 

Services rendered - Amount 



3U,ll6 33,712 
$16,828,113 $17,096, 3U5 



$ 1,997,378 $1U,20U,233 



6U,058 
11 




37,951 
11 


7,389 
908,659 


^^ 


6,703 

9U3,602 


126,520 


$ 


137,023 


102,718 


$ 


65,821 



-«- Total amount of encumbrance requests underestimated for 1962-63. 
Detailed statistics maintained during 1963-61; produces above amount* 



- 3 - 






GENERAL CCT.:TTa t TS 

Ths past year, while not narked by material changes in facilities, 
procedures and methods as was the case in the preceding year saw steady progress 
being made as the result of these changes. 

The advantages of the larger, better designed and better lighted quarters, 
occupied in April, 1?63, continue to accrue. 

Purchasing under the revised limits since April, 1°63, set by ordinance as a 
result of the charter amendment voted in June, 1962, has continued to be more rapid 
and efficient and to result in better service to departments. 

Additional expansion of the use of travelling requisitions continues to 
reduce paper work by eliminating repetitive typing and processing. 

Continued increase in products and services under teim contracts has been 
of material benefit to the Purchasing and using departments. 

Concurrent with the development of the Coding system for equipment, 
materials and supplies, studies were made and meetings with other departments were 
held in order that the system could be put into useful operation as soon as possible, 

The department cooperates with the U.S. Department of Justice in reporting 
all tie bids to them. Si ilar information is furnished to the California Depart- 
ment of Justice as requested. 

The specification and control section formed for studies which cannot be 
done by buyers without impairing their work functioned on an intermittent basis 
because of lack of personnel. The need for expanding this function to full time 
is clearly apparent in view of rapid technological advances in processes, equipment, 
and materials and supplies. 

Use of Friden Flexowriters for bids, automated purchase order writing and 
blanket orders continued. Mew functions are continually being performed. This 
method has been found to be of immeasurable value because original source data 
can be reused from tapes. 

Storekeeping records and control were materially improved because of more 
direct supervision, improved methods, and departmental cooperation. The bureau, 
however, has been handicapoed because of lack of personnel and the extended use of 
temporal"/ employments. 

Central Shops at 8^0 Quint Street continued to function efficiently. As 
stated elsewhere, preliviinary work was done on vehicle management procedure. 

The new Hall of Justice Service Station has been highly successful in 
serving the Police and other departments at the Hall of Justice and some City Hall 
vehicles. It is expected that the services provided id 11 be expanded pnrticularly 
greasing, minor adjustments, tires, and inspection for the proposed preventative 
maintenance program. 



Personnel of the Reproduction and Tabulating Bureau worked with many depart- 
ments on form design, reproduction problems, adaption to tabulating and others, 
which will result in the expanded use of these central facilities, and on coordina- 
tion with projected ED? program. 

The Purchasing Department is actively participating in the EDP program. 
The Purchaser is on the committee appointed by the CAO for application to depart- 
ments under him; the Supervisor of Tabulating is now on leave assigned to the EDP 
project; a number of department employees took general courses in this subject. 



BUREAU OF BUYING 

This Bureau procures materials and supplies, equipment, insurance, contracts 
for services, for all city departments and the San Francisco Unified School District. 
Except for term contracts based on estimated quantities, all buying starts with 
receipt of requisition from the using department. Included in or incidental to the 
procurement function are the following: (outlined in detail in a previous report) 

I. Buying - Bids and Awards 

Preparation of bids including contractual and technical requirements; 
evaluation of bids; and award of bids, 

II, Buying - Related Functions 

Analysis of records of average use; maintenance of specification file; 
new term contracts; and review of procedures. 

PERSOr.ZL 

The Buying Division is headed by the Assistant Director of Purchasing and 
Services and includes 11 assistant purchasers. The clerical staff, under the 
Bureau of Personnel and Accounts, is engaged in typing, mailing, opening and 
tabulating bids, maintaining bid index and specifications file, and typing contracts. 
Funds for some of these employments, both buying and clerical, are provided by other 
departments. 

Detailed employments are as follows: 

1 - Assistant Director of Purchasing and Services 

1 - Senior Purchaser 
7 - Purchasers 

2 - Purchasers (Printing) 
1 - Assistant Purchaser 

OPERATIONS 

Purchasing work is assigned on a commodity basis with allowance for items 
of a special nature or in cases where seasonal peaks or vacation period make it 
advisable to temporarily deviate from this policy, 

- 5 - 



OPERATIONS - Continued 

Periodic meetings of the buying staff permit the exchange of ideas, 
explanation of improved procedures and generally keep the assistant purchasers 
informed as to the over-all progress and problems. 

Every effort is made to process requisitions as rapidly as possible but 
delays occur due to lack of personnel, inadequate information furnished -with 
requisitions, and failure of departments to submit requisitions promptly for 
equipment items that are to be grouped for purchase for purposes of standardization 
and economy. 

In preparing requisitions, departments are requested to furnish information 
that will indicate a standard of over-all quality and usefulness suitable for 
actual use-requirements and permit competition as required by the Charter and 
Administrative Code, (see Purchaser's letter dated May 1, 1962, subject: 
Requisitions for Equipment (And Certain Materials and Supplies)), Departments are 
invited to discuss preparation of requisitions as well as other purchasing methods 
with the purchasing department. 

As time is available personnel are assigned to: 

1, Review specifications, forms and procedures, 

2, Analyze past purchases with a view towards establishing additional term 
contracts for articles and services where desirable. 

The need for a separate section to expand the above services is apparent 
if the department is to most efficiently and effectively perform its purchasing 
functions. This work is now being done on an intermittent basis as time is avail- 
able. Every effort should be made to procure a full time employment for this work« 

Whenever practical, term contracts are entered into for various service and 
commodities in general use by several departments or recurring use by a department. 
The main advantages are elimination of the time lag resulting when individual bids 
are requested and elimination of the costs involved in individual bids, A recent 
addition to the list of term contracts provides for moving household and office 
equipment. Departments have been notified to inform the Purchasing Department 
regarding services or articles that might be advantageously purchased for them on 
term contracts, 

Nextf term contracts initiated during the year include: 

1, Door Closers, Floor hinges and parts 

2, Radio and Electronic parts, supplies, accessories and related items 

3, Liquid Fish Fertilizer 

U, Printing Miscellaneous Contract Forms 

5= Globe, Gate, Angle and Check Valves 

6, Refinishing Interior of Fire Engine Booster Tanks 

7, Die Impressed Mimeo Stencils 

8, Lease of X-ray Equipment 



OPERATIONS (concluded) 

Some purchases or contracts of an unusual nature or involving a substantial 
outlay include the following: 

1. X-ray Lease - with the cooperation of the City Attorney's office and 
the Department of Public Health a lease bio was awarded for leasing 
X-ray equipment for the San Francisco General Hospital. Equipment 

to be leased is of the type that may be anticipated to become obsolescent 
within a few years and the ]ease permits the Hospital to have up-to-date 
X-ray equipment at all times, 

2. Turbines (to drive power generators) for Hetch Hetchy. 

3. Language Laboratories (electronic) for San Francisco Unified School 
Districts 

U. Balcony Seats for Civic Auditorium. 

5» Shuttle bus service for San Francisco International Airport. 

6. Various large components for rehabilitation of cable car system. 



BUREAU OF PERSONNEL AND ACCOUNTS 

This Bureau, supervised by a Head Clerk with 2h employees, has charge of 
budgetary and personnel functions, processes bids, purchase orders and contracts; 
checks invoices for payment by Controller, sells charters, codes and other 
documents, and procures official bonds for officers and employees. 

Sales of charters, codes and other documents amounted to $3929, 

Discounts earned amounted to $5>8,U26 or 97.7 percent and discounts 
unearned $1,363 or 2.3 percent. Comparable figures for the previous year were 
$5l,23£ or 98.9 percent and $587 or 1.1 percent. 



- 7 - 



coprir .i.'l >.<">.-. 

The new coding division, under the Bureau of Buying, that began operation 
in October, 1962, tc develop a uniform coding system for all material purchased 
for the City and County of San Francisco, has reached the stage where the 
Cataloging Handbook and the Codification Catalog is ready to be published* 

As soon as the catalogs are published, meetings will be held with all 
department heads and personnel that requisition material and equipment, to acquaint 
them with the format of the coding system and how to proceed to put it in operation. 

The new Codification Catalog will be based on the format established by the 
Armed Forces Supply Center and will have a nine digit code arranged as follows: 

353-06-0001. The first digit, 3, will indicate Material and Supplies and 
be the first digit of the Object of Expenditure, "O.E.", (if the article 
is classed as equipment the first digit T -xill be U«) The next two digits, 
53, are the Group Numbers and last two digits of the O.E. The fourth and 
fifth digits are the Class digits, and the last four digits are the Item 
Numbers. The City of San Francisco Supply Classification Code will consist 
of 60 Groups of the 99 Groups that are available, and will use 5>l±2 out of 
the 999 Classes. This will leave 39 Groups and h$l Classes available for 
future expansion. Each Group will be published as a separate catalog due 
to the fact some departments will require only four or five groups; others 
will require forty or more. Each group will be punched for a loose leaf 
binder and stapled. 

The Cataloging Handbook contains instructions on how to use the new code, 
a breakdown of the approved unit abbreviations, the index of material to proper 
group numbers and a commodity classification breakdown into group and class 
numbers. This catalog will be furnished to all departments requisitioning material. 

The Codification Catalogs will have item code numbers for material stocked 
by the various departments of the City as well as items that have been ordered 
periodically the past year or so. These catalogs rail be kept up to date by 
issuing a supplement to each group as items are added or deleted. 










Central Warehouse 




Central Warehouse - Receiving Area 



BUREAU OF STORES AND EQUIROIT 

The Bureau of Stores and Equipment operates and maintains a central ware- 
house and storerooms in various City departments; receives snd issues materials, 
supplies and equipment for all departments of the City and County of San Francisco, 
and makes miscellaneous emergency purchases for the account of the various agencies. 
This Bureau arranges for the sale of and sells surplus and obsolete personal property 
belonging to the City, exchanges equipment between departments, maintains a perpetual 
inventory of all materials purchased for the City and County of San Francisco and 
makes periodic checks of such property. The Bureau maintains control of the entire 
automotive fleet, including the listing, insurance and the reporting of all accidents. 



The following 
Inventory and Stores: 



locations are staffed and operated by the Division of Sales, 



Name and Location 
Central Warehouse - 15 th & Harrison 



Dept. Public Works 

Water Department 
Hetch Hetchy 
San Francisco Airport- 
Municipal Railway 



Health Deuartment 



Public Welfare 

Dept. of Electricity 
Recreation and Park 
Sheriff 

Central Shop Store 
-"-::- Storage only 



Type 

Stationery 
Janitorial supplies 
2500 cans foodstuffs 
Misc. furniture 
Pipe 

2323 Army St. 

639 Bryant Street 

Moccasin, Calif. 

South San Francisco 

2Uth & Utah Sts. and 2 sub stores 

General Store 

Elkton Yard (Carbarn Fund) 

Potrero and one sub store 

Washington & Mason (sub-store) 

SF Hospital, 22nd & Potrero 

Laguna Honda Hospital, 7th Ave. & Dewey 

Hassler Health Home, Redwood City 

Single Mens' Rehabilitation Center, 
Redwood City 

901 Rankin Street 

Golden Gate Park 



Hall of Justice Garage (sub-store) 

Amount included with departmental inventory 



Amount of Inventory 

$ 13,OU2 
3,179 



76,378 

369, 60U 

32,536 

17,095 

125,288 

2U5,023 

h6,25h 

67,25o 

20,835 

200,928 

179,511 

2U,500 

3,978 

16,009 
1+9,697 
35,8U2 



PERSONNEL 



The Sales, Inventory, and Stores divisions are staffed by the following: 

1 - Stores and Equipment Supervisor 

1 - Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor 

1 - Senior Clerk -Stenographer 

1 - Senior Clerk-Typist 

2 - Inventory Clerks 

10 - Senior Storekeepers 
21 - Storekeepers 

8 - Assistant Storekeepers 

1 - Laborer 



Total 



~K5- 



- 9 - 



SALES DIVISION 

Ten sales were conducted during the fiscal year under the authority of 
Section 88 of the Charter. Sales activities included legal research into various 
aspects of different sales, preparatio i of sales, inviting interested buyers to bid, 
opening and awarding of bids, collecting and depositing all v.oney received from 
buyers with the City Treasurer and keeping records of correspondence relative to the 
sales. 

The total revenue from the sales of I963-6I4. was $37,95>1.U9. A general 
breakdown of the sales is as follows : 

Waste Paper $ 907. Ik 

Grease and Bones 1,710.85 

Scrap Metal 7,273.U7 

Autos and Trucks l5,96l.5U 

Sand £,705,3U 

Used Office Furniture 795.81; 

Fare Boxes 666. 60 

Sacks and Containers U26.75> 

Misc. Sales l,89iu36 

Auditorium Chairs 2,609.60 

Total $37,9<1.U9 

The Bureau continued the selling of used automobiles by public sale. 
Fifty one passenger automobiles, and thirty six trucks were sold. During the 
corning fiscal year several different types of automotive s:\Les will be tried in 
order to determine which one will realize the most revenue for the City. 

INVENTORY DIVISION 

The program for this division includes the maintenance of a perpetual 
inventory of the City's equipment j moving and transferring equipment of various 
departments; investigation and reporting of missing or stolen property ; and the 
transferring of used equipment between departments. 

This division was assigned the task of coordinating the move of the Water 
Department to its new localion on Rankin Street; and also the moving of other 
departments, including Record Center, Civilian Defense, Recreation and Park 
Engineers, de Young Iluseum and Public Welfare. Procedures, estimates, and 
appropriations dealing with the moves were set up, including meetings with department 
heads and moving contractors. 

The perpetual inventory control of City equipment is a continuing program. 
At this time approximately 90% of inventory data is up-to-date and has been 
presented to the various departments for acknowledgment and acceptance. 

During the fiscal year the rehabilitation of equipment and the transferring 
of surplus properties to various departments to the extent of $30,000 inventory 
value was effected, thus relieving the departments of having to purchase new 
equipment . 

- 10 - 



An important responsibility of this division continues to be automobile 
control. The integration of the automobile administration into a central control, 
with the use of the IBM system, is now fully operational. This lorovides a 
practical, comprehensive and flexible program in dealing with acquisition, assign- 
ment, licensing, insurance and disposition of the City's entire automobile fleet, 
valued at $2,000,000, and comprising approximate ly 3*000 vehicles. 
Automobile insurance coverages were extended to cover all City vehicles with the 
exclusion of emergency vehicles - police, fire and ambulances, and Municipal Railway 
revenue vehicles. Insurance coverages have been continued at $100/100,000 Bodily 
Injury Liability and $100,000 Property Damage liability, thus affording substantial 
protection. 

5TCRI3 prrEsicu 

This past year has been a difficult year personnel wise, due to the lack of 
an existing list for permanent storekeepers. Fifteen new employees have been hired 
for periods of 90 days to five months. This has caused a terrific hardship in the 
departments affected. Three of our group received promotions to better positions, 
two within our own bureau and one to another department. 

We are replacing the old wooden bins in the storeroom at the Department of 
Electricity with new steel ones; and are alsc worieLng on the establishment of a 
Revolving Fund for stores at this new storeroom. 

The duties of the storekeeper at the Department of Public Works at 2323 Army 
Street have been increased with the addition of the pipe yard, which was formerly 
at 18U9 Harrison Street. 

Four new Ansul Dry Chemical Fire Fjctinguishers were installed in the Central 
Warehouse; and all the old water pipes in the building were replaced with copper 
tubing. Additional changes were also made in the storage facilities for the Public 
Administrator at the Central Warehouse. 

The Water Department has completed the move into new quarters on IJewcomb St. 
The larger storeroom area there has increased the duties of the two storekeepers 
to such an extent that we have added another temporary storekeeper, It is our 
hope that we will be able to keeo this additional help on a oermanent basis. 

The storage area of the Municipal ?.ailway's Elkton Yard has been consider- 
ably reduced by the construction of a freeway through part of the property, and 
arrangements should be made to alleviate this shortage of storage space. 

The Central Shops storeroom is having an extra mezzanine floor added for 
more storage space. The S .".;os storeroom is still in the process of having 
material coded, eliminating all obsolete stock, and building up a stock of active 
moving items, which are required to service equipment in active use. 

1 le effect of automation is having its repercussions. The change-over is 
taking tine and the delays are very costly. This has caused added work to be 
thrown on the storekeepers in being sure the material is on hand when needed, and 
that the correct amounts are ordered, 

- 11 - 



While improvements have been made in each department, there are many things 
left undone, most of them due to budget requests being refused. The major require- 
ment needed was a lifter truck to unload heavy loads of lumber, steel, etc., which 
are received and issued at the ilunicipal Railway 's ELkton Yard store. 

At some store divisions new types of records geared to automation are being 
established to speed the processing of requisitions and for better regulation and 
control. The travelling requisition has proven very successful and is now being 
used by every department using the same vendors every month. The original requisi- 
tion is put on a tape and then automatically typed. This tape is used every month 
until either the contract expires or the vendor is discontinued. 

ge:t3.al 

A safety delegate was apoointed to visit storerooms at regular intervals 
and check for hazardous situations, safety violations, and other things which 
might lead to an occasion for accidents and loss of tir.ie. He also attended the 
California Safety Congress which was held here in San Francisco. 

Several members of the bureau are continuing to attend adult night school 
to obtain a high school diploma, and several others have gone further and attended 
classes in supervision. 

The Stores and Equipment Assistant Supervisor has attended several Material 
Handling meetings, and a one day seminar at Stanford University with the Coding 
Supervisor. He has also been present in an advisory capacity at several State 
examinations for storekeeping personnel. 

The Stores and Equipment Supervisor attended the American Transit 
Association meeting in Los Angeles, and has already put into practice many 
suggestions received at that meeting. 

All of the supervisory personnel in the bureau have attended sessions being 
conducted under the auspices of the Civil Service Commission to obtain a better 
knowledge of electronic data processing, and its aoolic?tion to the -orooosed over-all 
coding operations being planned for City- ide use. 

During the year the bureau lost the very capable and valuable services of 
the Stores and Equipment Supervisor, Mr. James E, Leary, through his retirement after 
39 years of loyal and faithful service. The Acting Stores and Equipment Super- 
visor herewith wishes to exoress his thanks for the confidence, counsel, and never- 
failing help and support of the Purchaser of Supplies during the past year. He 
would also like to commend the entire staff of the bureau for their loyalty, 
cooperation and steadfastness during a very trying and critical year. 



- 12 - 




Central Shops - Passenger Shop 




Central Shops - Fire Apparatus Shop 



BUREAU OF SHOPS 

The Central Shops and allied facilities provide necessary mechanical mainten- 
ance and repair service for all City departments and bureaus (excepting Public 
Utilities). In addition, it is the responsibility of this Bureau to inspect, 
aporaise and make recommendations on all City owned vehicles contemplated for 
replacement, aid the various departments in the writing of specifications, and to 
receive 2nd approve all new vehicles delivered to the City and County of San Fran- 
cisco. 

Administration and major repair facilities are located at the Central Shops, 
800 Quint Street. Other installations are: Golden Gate Park Shop, providing 
maintenance for Recreation and Park Department Equipment; Hsll of Justice Service 
Station, where fuel and lubricants are provided for Police and other City c.ors, and 
inspection and light maintenance for Police vehicles; Dept. of Public 'Jorks' Army 
Street Yard and 19th Avenue Station; Health Dept. Garage; and Department of 
Electricity Yard. 

The Central Shoos have four main maintenance shop areas : 1. Automobile, 
2. Truck, 3. Fire Apparatus, h* Machine, and the following auxiliary shops: 
Blacksmith, Pattern, Paint, Hose, Upholstery, Body Cc Fender, Tire, and Service 
Station. In addition to the responsibilities for the maintenance and repair of 
mechanical equipment in school buildings, sewage plants, pumping stations, public 
buildings, etc., 16 91 motorized units of the Citv owned fleet are maintained, an 
increase of 15> over the fiscal year 1962-63. These vehicles are valued at over 
6.5 million dollars. 

There were no additional employees added to the Bureau in this fiscal year. 
There are 9h budgeted employments as follows : 

1 - City Shops General Superintendent 

1 - Assistant Superintendent City Shops 
3 - Automotive Machinist Foremen 

2 - Automotive Machinist Sub-Foremen 

1 - Maintenance Machinist Foreman 
8 - Maintenance Machinist 

2u - Automotive Machinist 

7 - Automotive Mechanic 
28 - Automotive Servicemen 

2 - Pattern Maker 

3 - Car & Auto Painter 

3 - Body & Fender Morkers 

3 - Blacksmith 

1 - T /elder 

1 - Upholsterer 

1 - Chauffeur 

1 - Senior Account Clerk 

1 - Accountant 

1 - Account Clerk 

In audition, 1 General Storekeeper and 1 Storekeeper are assigned to the 
Central Shops to orocure, store and issue stock and supplies, 

- 13 - 



BUREAU OP SHOPS - Continued 

Benjamin Shain - 725U Auto Machinist Foreman (Acting City Shops Assistant 
Superintendent) retired after 30 years of City service. The efficient operations 
of the Park Shoos and later the Central Shops were, in large measure, due to his 
energetic leadership. 

F. Irving Karris and James J. Bolger, Automotive Machinists and Roy L. 
Bartmess, Auto Body and Fender Worker, retired from the Central Shops after many 
years of faithful service to the City and County of San Francisco. 

Gene "Jailer, Automotive Machinist, was -ranted a disability retirement and 
Edward Donovan, Automotive Machinist, died while in the service of the Central Shops, 

The following is a report of the year's activities of the various shops and 
sub-shops of the Central Shops Purchasing Department , 

Automobile Shop 

This shop staffed Tr ith 7 Automotive Mechanics, 2 Automotive Servicemen and 
1 Automotive Mechanic Foreman, Mr. Roy Didier, is responsible for the repair and 
maintenance of 567 City owned passenger cars. 

A total of 2393 jobs were completed by this shop, 

hS new Police cars, 2 new Fire cars, $ ne" station wagons for the Sheriff's 
Department and 2 new cars for the Housing Development were equipped with sirens, red 
lights, spot lights, revolving roof lights, security screens and other necessary 
equipment . 

10 rebuilt engines were installed, 17 engines were major overhauled, 123 
minor engine jobs were performed, 

98 stick transmissions were overhauled and l$h clutches were replaced. 131 
automatic transmissions were adjusted and serviced, h3 overhauled and 18 re-sealed 

86 road calls and tow jobs were performed, 

25"2 major and minor body and fonder damage jobs were repaired, 

A new Ammcc Brake Drum Lathe enabled the Shop to perform 339 brake jobs, 
which included safety inspection of wheel cylinders, brake lines, front end wear and 
leaking grease seals. 

New Sun Battery Starter Tester, Sun Volt Ampere Tester, and Diode Tester for 
generators, alternators and regulators enabled the Shop to perform more accurate 
diagnoses and reduce "down time". These new machines also assisted in the 1;70 
tune-up jobs performed, which included cleaning smog-control valves, overhauling 
carburetors, replacing plugs, points, condensors, and adjusting valves, 

A preventive maintenance inspection was established for Public TT eifare and 
Juvenile Court Departments in an effort to prolong useful operation of their 
vehicles and prevent road breakdown. 

- Hi - 



BUREAU 0? SHOPS - Continued 

Fire Apparatus Shop 

This shop is responsible for the maintenance, repair, and service of 220 
units of heavy duty fire apparatus. 

The staff consists of 9 Automotive Machinists, 1 Automotive serviceman, and 
1 Automotive Machinist Foreman, Mr. Leonard Counihan. 

During the fiscal year a total of 1003 shop jobs were completed, and 1968 
field service calls made. 

Two new triple combination fire pumps and one new 100 ' aerial truck were 
tested, equipped, and put into service ss were two new high pressure system service 
trucks. In addition, 9 auxiliary fire apparatus were converted and rebuilt into 
high pressure system service trucks and one converted into a Fire Department service 
squad wagon. 

The following list of completed jobs is typical of the work done in this shop: 

15 major engine repair or overhauls 
100 minor engine repair or overhauls 

U7 transmissions repaired or overhauled 

88 engine tune ups 
110 brake system repairs 

12 sets safety brakes installed 

U6 radiators repaired 

50 muffler and tail pipe repairs 

65 fire pump repairs 

59 aerial ladder repairs 
5 booster tanks refinished 

U0 vehicles equipped with required safety items 

hS chassis repairs 

Truck Shop 

The Truck Shop is responsible for the repair of over 600 varied pieces of 
mechanised equipment which are used by all City departments,, 

The shop completed 2183 jobs during the last fiscal year. This work was 
accomplished by 10 Auto Machinists and 2 Auto Servicemen who were under the super- 
vision of Foreman Auto Machinist James Elliot. 

Complete repairs of all types are part of the normal routine on the follow- 
ing equipment : 

liil Pickup Trucks 
27 Heavy Duty Trucks 
SS Compressors 

29 Light special equipment such as ambulances, concrete cutters, 
blowers etc. 
192 Heavy special equipment such as all types of road and earth moving 
equipment, farm equipment, sewer cleaners, power mowers etc. 

- 15 - 



?~-^.;v T 3 H'?? - C::~tinued 

Truck Shop - Cont. 

93 Medium Daty Trucks 
8 Heavy Tractors 

Major jobs included complete rebuilding and modifying 2 Wayne Sweepers fcr 
more efficient operation. This work will more than double the life of this equip- 
ment. 

Extensive repairs, including complete overhaul of all running gear, were also 
made tc Shop's Asphalt Spreader. 

In an effort to lessen field breakdown of trucks and subsequent read calls 
and out-of -service time, the Truck Shop initiated the policy of a preventative 
maintenance inspection of vehicles brought into the shop for a specific complaint 
or failure. The result has been that latent defects and potential breakdowns 
have been avoided on many vehicles. 

Machine Shop 

This division of the Central Shops is mainly responsible for all "Non-Auto- 
motive" maintenance, repair and reconstruction of City equipment and installations* 
Services are available to all City departments except Public Utilities which 
provide their own. 

Operations consist of complete mechanical repairs to sewage treatment plants, 
pumping stations, school and other putlic buildings, jails, bridges, parks, school 
classroom tools and equipment, Public Works, the high pressure system and operating 
equipment, and tools of the Fire Department, plus many others too numerous to detail. 

Services include the drawing, layout and furnishing of patterns, ordering 
and inspection cf castings, complete machining and manufacture of machine parts 
with final assembly and installation where required, including the manufacture of 
special equipment and tooling when requested. 

General machining operations are performed for the various automotive shops. 

Personnel of this division operate under direction of the General Superin- 
tendent and his assistant through the Maintenance Machinist Foreman, Mr. Robert 
Roller •who supervises the activities of 8 permanent and one temporary Maintenance 
Machinist. 

In addition to the main Machine Shop with S> Machinists, 2 Sewage Treatment 
Plant sub-shops have one Machinist each with 2 Machinists at the large South East 
Plant Machine Shop. 

Activities during the year were covered by 7U8 separate and distinct job 
descriptions, many of a major nature, plus 10U miscellaneous machine operations 
for the automotive divisions. 

Total expenditures of this division were $206,f>00 - approximately 22^ of the 
total shop budget for the fiscal year. 

- 16 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Machine Shop - Cont. 

A few major jobs during the year were:. 

1. Marina Sewage Pumping Station - complete overhaul of main pumps. 

2. DF.I Army Street Yard - reconstruction cf sand conveyor and elevator. 

3. Palace of Legion of Honor.- complete overhaul and conversion of main 
heating blower. 

ii. Abraham Lincoln High School - complete overhaul of stage curtain 
operating mechanism. 

5. Police Pistol Range - overhaul and reconstruction of target machinery. 

6. Fire Department Water Tower #1 - reconstruction of accident damage to 
telescope sections. 

7. Fourth Street - force main sewers - special tooling and apparatus for 
repair of break. 

8. Aquatic Park - complete overhaul of main sewage pumps (U) . 

9. Golden Gate Park - reconstruction of main gear drive on merry-go-round. 
1C. Civic Center Powerhouse - complete overhaul of main feedwater pumps. 

Recreation and Park Automotive Shop 

This shop, located ir the Maintenance Yard area of Golden Gate Park, is 
staffed with 3 Automotive Machinists, one Automotive Serviceman, - n( j one Automotive 
Machinist Foreman, Mr. A. Kend. 

Maintenance and repairs were performed op the following pieces of equipment 
operated by the Recreation and Park Department. < 

18 Passenger Cars 

52 Truck of all types 

11 Tractor Mowers 

h Tractor Loaders 
38 Miscellaneous as D6 Caterpillar Tractor-Cat. Grader-chipper, Sweepers, 

Air Compressors, Pumps, etc. 
125 Power operated mowers 
50 Hand Mowers 
35 Miscellaneous pieces such as Threaders, Spikers, Spray Machines, Roto 

Tillers, and Power Saws 

During the past fiscal year a total of 766 jobs were completed on automotive 
equipment and £10 jobs on various power and hand mowers „ 

Major overhaul was completed on a D-6 Caterpillar Tractor, an International 
Loader, and the "Tree Topper" Boom Truck. 

Hall of Justice Service Station 

This unit of the Central Shops is located adjacent to the Hall of Justice and 
provides fuel and service to Police Department vehicles, and fuel and oil to other 
City departments. The station is operated 7 days a week from 7 a.m. to midnight. 
It is staffed with 9 Automotive Servicemen, 2 Automotive Mechanics, and one Sub- 
Foreman, Mr. Jack Quinn„ 

- 17 - 



BURE AU OF SHOPS - Continued 

Hall of Justice Service Station - Cont. 

The convenient location of this station for City vehicles and the accelerated 
usage of Police vehicles have made this station a high volume distribution point for 
auto fuels and lubricants 

The past fiscal year shows the following services performed: 

Gasoline dispensed U56,000 Gal. 

Oil dispensed U,121 Gal. 

Tow jobs 1,075 

Tires Changed (new and recaps) Lt 5 285 

Batteries (new or recharged) 6h0 

Grease & service jobs 2,530 

Mechanical repairs 5,514-U 
Motorcycle Service: 

Oil changes 1,300 

Tires (new or recaps) 5>00 

Batteries (new or recharged) 700 

The preventative maintenance service and inspection urogram continues to pay 
dividends in a better operating Police fleet with minimum down time due to 
mechanical failure,, 

There still exists, however, the need for an additional Automotive Serviceman 
so that all Police vehicles might receive this service The additional employee 
would permit cancelling of the present service contracts 

Pattern and Ladder Shop 

This shop, staffed with 2 Patternmakers, manufactured 8 and repaired or 
overhauled 82 Fire Department ladders. In addition, numerous wood fittings, hose 
bumpers, pike poles, and fire axes were manufactured or repaired and necessary 
patterns for Central Shop, BPW, and High Pressure system operations were manufactur- 
ed or repaired. 

Paint Shop 

This shop, staffed with 3 Car and Auto Painters, are responsible for all 
necessary vehicle painting and Fire Department ladder refinishing. 

550 paint jobs on damaged and repaired vehicles were accomplished as were 
8 complete paint jobs on heavy duty trucks, and 75 refinishing jobs on various Fire 
Department ladders, 

Blac ksm ith Shop 

This shop performs all of the xrelding, forging, and general heavy duty metal 
fabrication necessary to repair and outfit fire apparatus, Public Works' trucks, etc. 

Major work consisted of manufacture of 18 street cleaning "pickup" buggies, 
rebuilding bodies of 2 eductors- manufacture and installation of guards, steps, and 
other safety devices for City trucks. 

- 18 - 



" ." :.•." -~ v ; 7 ' - C p.tinued 
Blacksnith Shop - Cent. 

This shop is now entirely staffed with linited tenure employees due to: 
(l) classification change, (2) promotion of three employees to Public Utilities, 
This is an undesirable situation and it is hoped that the near future will see 
competent permanent employees in this shop. 

Upholstery She: 

This sub-shop with one Upholsterer manufactures and repairs leather goods, 
belts, covers, safety devices used by the Fire Department and, in addition, repairs 
and upholsters vehicle seats, interior lining, etc. 

A total of 517 jobs were accomplished during the year 

Body and Fender Shop 

This sub-shop is responsible for all body and fender repairs on City vehicles 
and any alterations and modifications necessary on vehicle bodies. Three Body and 
Fender workers are employed. 

A total of 381 "accident type" vehicle body repairs were made. Of these, 
2U8 were repaired in the shops and 133 were completed by low bid contract, 

A noteworthy "non accident" type project initiated in this shop was the 
development and manufacture of Police patrol car screens. These provide a 
security divider between the front and rear seat of Police cars so that law 
breakers are transported quickly from place of arrest without having to wait for 
a patrol wagon to respond. 

Fire, Hcse and Broom Shcp 

One Maintenance Machinist divides his time between inspection and repair of 
all types of fire hose and fittings and the repair and rebuilding of steel gutter 
brooms used on the mechanical street sweepers. 

During the year 21,000 feet of new fire hose was received, inspected, tested, 
labeled and distributed to the various fire engine companies. An equal amount was 
backed down to the lower pressure zone and a like amount condemned for disposal or 
sale 

This shop also rebuilt a total of 112 steel gutter brooms for use by DFW 
Street Cleaning power sweepers. 

Army Street Station 

This station, located at 2323 Army Street in the DPW Yard, provides fuel and 
lube service to all DFi vehicles working out of that area. It operates £§ days per 
week from 7 a.m. to midnight,, It is staffed by 2 Automotive Servicemen, 1 Auto- 
motive Serviceman Sub-Foreman, Mr. Robert Desmond, and one Automotive Machinist, 

- 19 - 



BUREAU OF SHOPS - Continued 
Army Street Station - Cont. 

The past year 282,000 gallons of gasoline, 20,000 gallons of kerosene, 
and 2,6IiO gallons of oil were dispensed, A total of 122U vehicles were lubed and 
serviced. 

Minor miscellaneous repairs, clutch and brake adjustments, tune-ups, 
electrical repairs and field services amounted to 219U separate jobs. 

19th Avenue Service Station 

This station, located en 19th Avenue near Taraval Street, provides service 
and garage facilities for DPW vehicles assigned to the western section of the City, 
Gasoline ana oil are dispensed to other City vehicles operating in that area, 
thereby effecting a substantial saving in fuel costs and operators' time 3 

57 j 500 gallons of gasoline and 2390 quarts of oil were dispensed; 56 major 
.services were performed on heavy duty trucks and U72 minor services and repairs made. 

Qu int Street Service Station 

This station located at Central Shops provides fuel and service to City 
vehicles garaged or operating in the area. In addition, fire apparatus and cars 
receive preventative maintenance and periodic lube service, A total of 102,500 
gallons of gasoline was dispensed during the past year The station was improved 
with the relocation of one of the three pumps so that two lanes of vehicles can 
now be gassed simultaneously. 

Accounting Section 

To take advantage of a recent change in the Annual Appropriation Ordinance, 
pertaining to moneys received in payment for damages done to City vehicles, a 
procedure was established to assist the various departments in their efforts to 
effect early collections. 

Over 185 "accident invoices" were mailed the day they were requested c 
$5U00 was collected immediately without any legal suit being required. Approxi- 
mately $26,000 in claims against second parties was turned over to the Delinquent 
Revenue Bureau, and it is anticipated that most of this amount xri-11 eventually be 
returned to the City. Under the new appropriation ordinance the $5U00 collected 
was credited back to the various departments' repair accounts, rather than to the 
General Fund as in the past. 

Recreation and Park Garage was brought under cost control in the same manner 
as all other Central Shop repair activities. All units were classified and numbered, 
Monthly invoicing by unit or vehicle is now furnished to this department. A cost 
of unit maintenance can now be developed which will assist in preparation of future 
budget estimates. 



- 20 



BURE AU OF SHOPS - Continued 

A "Survey of the Administration of Motive Equipment" was made during this 
fiscal year by John F. Forbes and Company with the cooperation of the offices of 
the Mayor, Chief Administrative Officer and Controller at the request of the Central 
Shops Purchasing Department, 

This is a report on a survey and recommendations for improvement of the 
administrative policies and practices governing the acquisition, operation, and 
maintenance of motive equipment operated by the City and County of San Francisco „ 

The purpose of this study and the ultimate aim is to realize maximum usage 
at lowest possible cost of the huge fleet of City owned vehicles 

It is anticipated that the recommendations, where practicable, will be put 
into force during the next fiscal year. 



- 21 




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CENTRAL T..BULATING BUREAU 

The Central Tabulating Bureau provides centralized service, available to all 
City and County of San Francisco departments, in machine accounting (IBM). 

The Bureau occupies two locations: City Hall and Hall of Justice. 

The Bureau is administered by a Tabulating Division Supervisor with the 
assistance of a Principal Tabulating Machine Operator and a Senior Tabulating 
Machine Operator. Funds for operating expenses are provided by budget transfers 
and work orders from departments using these services. The total cost for work 
processed during the fiscal year 1963-196U amounted to $lU2,6l3, an increase of 
$16,092 over the previous fiscal year. 

The following tabulation shows a list of the personnel and equipment at the 
two locations of this Bureau: 

Room lg8, City Hall Room 12g, Hall of Justice 

Personnel 

1 Supervisor of Tabulating 
1 Senior Tabulating Machine Operator 1 Principal Tabulating Machine Operator 
3 Tabulating Machine Operators 3 Tabulating Machine Operators 

1 Key Punch Operator 5> Key Punch Operators 

Equipmen t 

3 Key Punch Machines 8 Key Punch Machines 

2 Sorting Machines 3 Sorting Machines 
1 Collator 2 Collators 

1 Interpreter 1 Interpreter 

1 Reproducer-Summary Punch 2 Reproducers 

2 Accounting Machines 2 Accounting Machines 

Major Recurring Functions of the Tabulating Section : 

Department Functi on 

Municipal Court Traffic Citations: 

Calendars, Abstracts, Adjudication Statistics, 
Cash, Motor Vehicle, Notices, Warrants, Moving 
Violations, Paid and Unpaid License File, Moving 
Violation Paid Calendar, Missing Tags, and 
Miscellaneous Records and Reports 

Civil Service Commission Salary Standardization Reports, Salary Survey Data 

Analysis, Recruitment and Examination Records 

Controller Budget Statistics 

Tabulation of Officials' Bonds, Canceled Warrant 
Report, Summary of Unpaid Property Taxes 
Daily Encumbrance Posting Reports (Purchase Orders) 
Budget Priority, SJVs, Claims Against City 
Public Health Mental Payments 

- 22 - 



Department 



Controller (EDP) 



Purchasing Department 



Tax Collector 



CENTRAL TABULATING BUREAU - Continued 

Functi on 

Miscellaneous and Utilities, Tax - Assessor, 
Civil Service, Retirement, Health Service, Budget, 
Payroll, Payroll RPG 

Inventories - Equipment and Warehouse 
Stores Stationery Control, Record of Average Use 
(materials), Fee Tag Reports, Purchase Order 
Registers, Shop Expenditure Reports, Vehicle 
Maintenance Cost Accounting, Contracts and other 
Statistics, Proposal Index, Bid Index 

License Tax Accounting: Hotels, Apartment Houses, 
Food Inspection, Pin Ball Machines, etc 
Hotel Transient Tax 



Registrar of Voters 

Dept, of Public Health (Vital) 

- Central Office 

- SF General Hospital 

- Laguna Honda Hospital 

- Emergency Hospital 

- T. B. Subsidy 

Airport 

Chief Administrative Officer 
Bay Area Air Pollution 
Board of Education 

Public Utilities 
Heat, Light and Power 



Election Officer Payroll 
Election Analysis and Statistics 

Birth and Death Indexes and Statistics - Monthly 
and Annually, Venereal Disease, T.B. Statistics, 
Community Mental, Emergency Hospital 

Budget Statistics, Public Health Field Nursing^ 
Inspectors, Cost and Expenditures 

X-ray Statistics, Ward Census Summary, Inventory, 
Discharge Analysis 

Cost Accounting, Ward Census, Inventory- 
Statistics 
Statistics 

Audit 

San Francisco General Hospital Conference 

Index File and Statistics 

Purchase Order Listing 

Distribution and Accounting Records of Consumption 
of Gas and Electricity by City and County Depts„ 



The scope of machine accounting operations performed by the Bureau continues 
to expands During the fiscal year the following procedures were inaugurated: 

For the Controller - A listing of statistics for the new 61*00 machine; 

For the Purchasing Department - Brand Analysis, Garbage Collection, and 

Service Agreements. 



For the Municipal Court 



- Stoo and Release Dismissals and Group 
Demonstrations Arrest Index. 



- 23 - 



REPRODUCTION BUREAU 

The Reproduction Bureau furnishes all City departments the services of 
photography, offset printing, mimeographing, photostating (at main location, 
Room SO, City Hall), blueprinting (located 5th floor City Hall), and two self-service 
electrostatic copiers - one on the main floor City Hall and the other in the City 
Hall Annex. 

Funds for the operation of this Bureau are provided by budget transfer and 
work orders from departments using these services. The work processed by this 
Bureau in the fiscal year 1963-6I4. amounted to $115,503, an increase of $12,786 
over 1962-63, 

The personnel is supervised by a Reproduction Manager i^ith a staff of ten 
employees. 

Room 50> City Hall (basement) 

1 - Blueprint and Reproduction Manager 

1 - Senior account Clerk 

1 - Photo -Lithographer 

1 - Photographer - as needed 

1 - Photostat Operator 

1 - Photostat Operator - part time 

1 - Senior Offset Machine Operator 

1 - Offset Machine Operator 

Fifth Floor, City Hall 

1 - Senior Blueprint Machine Operator 

2 - Blueprint Machine Operators 

The function of this Bureau is also to help all departments in reproduction 
problems and to meet deadlines when time is of the utmost importance especially on 
reports and advertised bids 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Funds have been appropriated and plans are in the final stages for major 
alterations on the Reproduction Bureau. These alterations include : 

Moving the large U2" blueprint machine and two lj.2" ammonia dry process 
machines from the fifth floor to the main reproduction center in Room 50« 

Addition of a new 17" x 22" Robertson copy camera and new darkroom 
adjacent to the offset printing section. 

Relocating of other miscellaneous equipment to eliminate crisscrossing 
of worke 

Adding a new 18" x 2I4." electrostatic copier to process the Assessor's 
abstracts of property transfers, which will be less cos+.Ty, and time saving* 

This alteration is expected to be completed by the end of I96U0 

- 2k - 



APPENDIX 



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TABLE NO. 1 
Showing 

PURCHASE ORDERS PROCESSED 





1963-61* 




1962-63 






Purchase 
Orders 


Amount 


Purchase 
Orders 


Amount 


General 


16,153 


$ 6,795,81+7 


17,U29 


■'• 6,721,062 


Education 


6,756 


3,01*5,980 


7,213 


3,238,959 


Health 


5,066 


2,556,1*19 


5,201* 


2,1*50,925 


Utilities 


5,737 


1,688,099 


U,270 


2,1*19,319 




33,712 


$17,096,31*5 


3U,ll6 


$11*, 830, 765 


Purchases by 

Encumbrance 

Requests 


$Ui,20U,233 * 

'•-31,300,578 




$ 1,997,378 
$16,828,11*3 



Total amount of encumbrance requests underestimated for 1962-63< 
Detailed statistics maintained during 1963-61* produce above 
amounts 



TABLE WO. 2 
EXPENDITURES 



Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all operating 
appropriations except Personal Services for I963-I96I4: 



Account Budgeted Expended Surplus Deficit 





Encumbered & 


Budgeted 


Expended 


032,133 


$28,580 


Hi, 000 


13,522 


31,678 


29,729 


27,760 


13,150 


U3,ooo 


1*2,690 


831 


819 



Contractual Services 032,133 $28,580 $ 3,553 

3.311.200.000 

Materials Se Supplies lli,000 13,522 U78 

3.311.300.000 

Equipment 31,678 29,729 1,9k? 



3,3l5.1|00.3H 

Premium - Official Bonds 27,760 13,150 lU,6l0 

3 . 315 .312 .311 
Premium - Auto Insurance U3,000 1*2,690 310 

3.315.813.3U 

Membership Dues 831 819 12 

3,311.800.000 

Total $11*9,1*02 $128,1*90 $20,912 







REVENUES 












Comparison of revenues with es 


timated 


revenues 


1963-6U 




Estimated 


Actual 




Over 




Under 


Account 


Revenue 


Revenue 




Estimated 


Estimated 


Sale of Documen 
7061 


ts $ 1,000 


$ 3,929 








$ 2,929 


Minor Sales 
7062 


5,000 


8,037 








3,037 


Sale of Grease 
7621 


1,500 


1,776 








276 



Total $7,500 $13,71*2 $6,21*2 



TABLE NO, 3 

SHOP EXPENDITURES 

Comparison of expenditures with original budget for all 
appropriations except personal services for 1963-196U : 



Object 

Administrative Salaries 

Wages 

Contractual Services 

Materials and Supplies 

Retirement 

Work Orders 



1963-6U 



1962-63 



Amount 


Amount 


$ 9,660 


$ 9,626 


537,012 


506,279 


108,819 


iii,Ui5 


195,560 


187,181 


6,691 


6,105 


85,857 


87,753 



Total $9^3,602 



$908,659 



Contractual Services 
Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 
Expenditure 

Materials and Supplies 
Original appropriation 
By transfer 

Less unexpended 



$ 77,582 

3U,190 
111,772 

Total $108,819 



$171,502 

26,87 7 

198,379 

2,819 

Total $195,560 



$ 77,9U6 
36,7U3 

11U;.6«9 

3,27U 
$lll,lil5 

$166, 9U5 

21.U 60 

92k 



$187,U81 



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